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Introduction to open educational resources 2013

"Introduction to Open Educational Resources(OER) by Michael Paskevicius, Learning Technologies Application Developer, Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning, UCT"


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Anne Whaits's curator insight, May 9, 2013 4:44 PM

A really great introduction to OER from Michael Paskevicius, University of Cape Town. Certainly will prove useful to those on the teaching team who have only recently started to explore the open movement and creative commons in particular.

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Use and Reuse of OER: professional conversations with language teachers | eLearning

Use and Reuse of OER: professional conversations with language teachers | eLearning | About learning and more | Scoop.it

This article by Tita Beaven was originally published on the Journal of e-Learning and Knowledge Society, volume 9, issue 1.

In the last ten years prestigious Open Education Resources projects have been set up, often with generous support from funders. Funders and institutions that support OER want evidence of their use and reuse; it seems, however, that OER have not yet been widely adopted by teachers as part of their daily practice.

This paper investigates the use and reuse of OER from a subject-specific repository for language teachers. In particular, the small scale study investigates how and why language teachers use OER in their teaching and rework existing resources. It also examines whether the teachers understand the resources and how to use and adapt them effectively, as an inability to do so has been considered an impediment to their reuse.

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Ten Years Later: Why Open Educational Resources Have Not Noticeably Affected Higher Education, and Why We Should Care (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Ten Years Later: Why Open Educational Resources Have Not Noticeably Affected Higher Education, and Why We Should Care (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | About learning and more | Scoop.it
EDUCAUSE Review Online

Key TakeawaysOpen educational resources made a dramatic appearance with the 2002 debut of MIT's Open Courseware initiative.In the roughly 10 years since, OERs have not noticeably disrupted the traditional business model of higher education or affected daily teaching approaches at most institutions.Four major hurdles seem the likeliest hindrances to adoption of OERs: discoverability, quality control, bridging the last mile, and acquisition.OERs could unify and advance the essentially disconnected developments in digital textbooks and MOOCs by establishing a global enterprise learning content management system.


Via Jesús Salinas
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ChrisPegler's curator insight, February 27, 2013 6:48 AM

Thanks to Terese Bird for bringing this to my attention via the OER13 Scoop.it. Consider following it and the conference in general (www.oer13.org).

 

It (somewhat but sadly perhaps does not really) amazes me that people can/could expect HE to change rapidly in response to any new idea. One of the bullets from this Educause reports points out:

In the roughly 10 years since, OERs have not noticeably disrupted the traditional business model of higher education or affected daily teaching approaches at most institutions.

Hm. Perhaps we need to look for evidence of change in different places? Should we expect TRADITIONAL business models to change? How about the interest in engaging in emergent business models (see FutureLearn and others) alongside, perhaps experimental but certainly now taken seriously. What do we expect of DAILY teaching approaches at MOST institutions? This is still offline at most institutions. But there ... waiting in the wings ... nudging into things ... yes, its OER/open content.

 

The question is whether if you were creating a new institution today whether you would implement teaching practices or adopt a business model which ignores the open agenda. Can't see it happening myself in US, UK and rest of Europe, Australia. Africia, South America, Indonesia ... well anywhere.