"What fool would expect a proud man to forget, The land he fought to defend"
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"What fool would expect a proud man to forget, The land he fought to defend"
Stage: 2 HSIE Change and Continuity - Significant Events and People - Aboriginal resistance to the establishment of a British colony — significant people including Pemulwuy, achievements, events and places
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References

Australian Catholic University. (2012). Learning and Teaching Centre. Strategies for cooperative and collaborative learning in large lecture groups. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from Australian Catholic University: http://www.acu.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/405768/Large_Group_Lectures_LTC.pdf

 

Baxter, P. (2010, June 12). A Ballad of Pemulwuy. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from YouTube: http://youtu.be/6XSU3-C8AyQ

 

Baxter, P. (2010). The Ballad of Pemulwuy . Retrieved April 21, 2013, from Peter Baxter: http://www.peterbaxter.ie/Peter_Baxter/Pemulwuy.html

 

Baxter, P. (2012, October 5). The Blue Black Waves Podcasts by Peter Baxter. Retrieved April 21, 2013, from itunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ie/podcast/blue-black-waves-podcasts/id541887508

 

Commonwealth of Australia. (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian Schools. Retrieved January 28, 2011 from http://www.globaleducation.edna.edu.au/globaled/go/pid/122

 

Fahey, C. (2012). “Planning for teaching and learning in geography and history”. In T. Taylor, C. Fahey, J.Kriewaldt & D. Boon (Eds). ‘Place and Time’ Frenches Forest: Pearson

 

Gibson, R. & Ewing, R. (2011). Transforming the curriculum through the arts. Palgrave Macmillan

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Hew, K. & Brush, T. (2007). Integrating technology into K-12 teaching and learning: current knowledge gaps and recommendations for future research. New York: Springer.

 

National Museum of Australia. (2012, October). Resistance. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from National Museum of Australia: http://www.nma.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/18997/Aboriginal_resist_colonisation_colour_Oct2012.pdf

 

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2007). Curriculum Support. Information skills in the school: engaging learners in constructing knowledge. Retrieved on 22nd April 2013 from NSW Department of Education and Training: http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/teachingideas/isp/docs/infoskills.pdf

 

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2007, September 5). DeBono's Six Thinking Hats. Retrieved April 21, 2013, from Curriculum Support: http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/designproduce/Assets/six_hat.doc

 

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2009). Excursions Policy Implementation Procedures. Retrieved on 21st April 2013 from NSW Department of Education and Training: https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&ved=0CDYQFjAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.det.nsw.edu.au%2Fpolicies%2Fstudent_admin%2Fexcursions%2Fexcursion_pol%2Fproced.doc&ei=KQ91UZi4DILxiAfK9YGwCQ&usg=AFQjCNHt0KKOEPsF43zc_RAXVv3iGGBnpA&bvm=bv.45512109,d.aGc

 

Pampena, S. (2012). Australian Government. Literacy and Numeracy week 2012. Venn diagrams. Retrieved on 21st April 2013 from Australian Government. Literacy and Numeracy week 2012: http://literacyandnumeracy.gov.au/video/venn-diagrams-one-direction-and-simon-pampena

 

Southwell, A. (2007). HSIE Curriculum Support. Planned Assessment in HSIE. New South Wales, Australia.

 

Visible Thinking. (n.d.). Why Make Thinking Visible. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from Visible Thinking: http://www.old-pz.gse.harvard.edu/vt/VisibleThinking_html_files/01_VisibleThinkingInAction/01b_WhyMake.html

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Sydney Living Museum Stage1-3.pdf

This website includes a learning resource for Stages 1-3 in HSIE. It provides programs in significant places such as the Elizabeth Farm where students explore the consequences of Terra Nullius. The program “Whose Place” at the Museum of Sydney enables students to investigate and discover the impact of British colonisation on Aboriginal people as well as the environment.

Teaching idea:

Before going on an excursion to Elizabeth Farm and the Museum of Sydney, have students investigate the Elizabeth Farm and pose inquiry questions related to who, what, when, how and why with the topic: Significant place. As Education Development Centre Inc (2012) explains, through inquiry learning, students are able to take “the lead in their own learning”. Students can then search for relevant primary and secondary resources to answer their questions. Teachers can model how they use Information Process of defining, locating, selecting, organising, presenting and assessing, which can “deliberately employ in their own learning... promoting student independence... supports students to become discerning users of information, in all its formats and sources” (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007, p.9). After the excursion, students can add what they have learnt to their notes about Elizabeth Farm.

Assessment:

In groups, students will use a wide range of sources to research a significant place each. “Research studies in education demonstrate that the use of technology... improve students’ inventive thinking (e.g., problem solving)... and improve students’ self-conept and motivation” (Hew and Brush, 2007, p.224). They will create a board game which includes these places. They will pose questions for the game. They will need to develop correct answers to their questions. Students will use a range of historical terms and include significant people and events they have learnt.

As a literacy strategy, after the board game is complete, students will write a journal reflection on how they think they worked as a group and as an individual in this task. As Southwell (2007, p.2) states, “Assessment is about providing opportunities for students to demonstrate what they know, understand and can do in relation to the syllabus outcomes in the context of the syllabus subject matter.” This board game enables students to collaborate with one another about the topics they have been learning about. And also gives a chance for students to exhibit their knowledge and skill.  

 Reference

Hew, K. & Brush, T. (2007). Integrating technology into K-12 teaching and learning: current knowledge gaps and recommendations for future research. New York: Springer.

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2007). Curriculum Support. Information skills in the school: engaging learners in constructing knowledge. Retrieved on 22nd April 2013 from NSW Department of Education and Training: http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/teachingideas/isp/docs/infoskills.pdf

Southwell, A. (2007). HSIE Curriculum Support. Planned Assessment in HSIE. New South Wales, Australia.

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A song about Pemulwuy - written by Irish man Peter Baxter

A song about Pemulwuy - written by Irish man Peter Baxter | "What fool would expect a proud man to forget, The land he fought to defend" | Scoop.it

This website includes a song about Pemulwuy, by Peter Baxter. They are from the original version. The rewritten lyrics can be found at http://www.peterbaxter.ie/Peter_Baxter/Pemulwuy.html.

Teaching ideas:

Before the lesson, stick one or two word clues such as “Aboriginal warrior” and “Tedbury” under students’ chairs. Pick a table of students to look under their chairs to find these clues. Students try to guess who Pemulwuy is from these clues.

Play the video of the song about Pemulwuy in the interactive whiteboard. Bring out DeBono’s Red Thinking Hat and discuss: What do you think/feel about Pemulwuy? How do you feel about the British people in this song? On a post-it note, students write their answer and stick it under the heading “Red Hat”. As NSW Department of Education and Training (2007, p.1) explains, “This higher order thinking strategy engages students in different types of thinking... also develops student confidence in expressing their viewpoint on a particular issue”. 

Listen to Baxter’s podcast telling the story of Pemulwuy and Me. Students individually think about, what information does the song give? Write the answer on a post-it note and stick it under “White Hat”. In pairs discuss what information is missing. How will we get the information we need? The Think-pair-share activity “fosters a community of learners and can help students get to know their peers” (Australian Catholic University, 2012, p.1).

As a literacy strategy, have students put forward ideas of what to write a letter to Peter Baxter inviting him to the school to talk about his song. Using DeBono’s green hat, students can suggest questions to ask Peter Baxter.

Assessment idea:

Have groups pick from Nemarluk, Windradyne, Calyute, Eumarrah, Tarenorerer, Dundalli or Musquito. Students research their achievements, events, reasons why they were resistance leaders, how they felt about British colonisation and how British colonisation impacted them. Have groups perform a significant moment of the resistant leader’s life and explain the reason. As Gibson and Ewing (2011, p.69) discuss, drama enables students to “empathise with others as they explore characters and situations ... challenge/question and interpret from multiple perspectives”. After each performance, have the audience put on the yellow hat and comment and reflect on what they thought about the performance and what they liked about it.

 

Reference

Australian Catholic University. (2012). Learning and Teaching Centre. Strategies for cooperative and collaborative learning in large lecture groups. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from Australian Catholic University: http://www.acu.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/405768/Large_Group_Lectures_LTC.pdf

Baxter, P. (2010, June 12). A Ballad of Pemulwuy. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from YouTube: http://youtu.be/6XSU3-C8AyQ

Baxter, P. (2010). The Ballad of Pemulwuy . Retrieved April 21, 2013, from Peter Baxter: http://www.peterbaxter.ie/Peter_Baxter/Pemulwuy.html

Baxter, P. (2012, October 5). The Blue Black Waves Podcasts by Peter Baxter. Retrieved April 21, 2013, from itunes: https://itunes.apple.com/ie/podcast/blue-black-waves-podcasts/id541887508

Gibson, R. & Ewing, R. (2011). Transforming the curriculum through the arts. Palgrave Macmillan

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2007, September 5). DeBono's Six Thinking Hats. Retrieved April 21, 2013, from Curriculum Support: http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/designproduce/Assets/six_hat.doc

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Winny Tang's comment, April 8, 2013 7:35 PM
Hi Peter! Thank you so much for linking me those, I would love to use them in my classroom when I'm a teacher. This is an assignment I'm completing at the moment in finding resources on the topic of Aboriginal resistance but when I am teaching this, it'd be great if you could come into the classroom and talk to the students about the song! Winny
PeterBaxter's comment, April 8, 2013 7:43 PM
That would be my pleasure. I live in Dublin these days so would take a bit of arranging! I'm back in Sydney every few years though and researching how I could develop the song as an educational aid for schools myself. Another teacher contacted me a while ago and said she was using the song in her class in Wollongong. I work in the non formal education sector in Ireland ( and sometimes in Europe) with www.songschool.ie and www.createschool.ie . Thanks again and please keep in touch - links for social media on those sites or my own www.peterbaxter.ie and next time I'm there I'll get into your class!
Winny Tang's comment, April 9, 2013 10:54 PM
Thanks Peter, can't wait to have you in the classroom! I've sent you an email :) Keep in touch!
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K-6 Educational Resources :: European Exploration in the Northern Hemisphere 1488-1664

This website includes a timeline on the European Exploration in the Northern Hemisphere 1488-1664. It outlines where and when other countries were discovered and/or colonised. And includes the explorers: Bartolomeu Dias, Christopher Columbus and Vasco da Gama. Teachers can use this timeline to work backwards. The goal for students to achieve is this timeline. And to understand that the British did not only colonise in Australia and have also impacted on other societies. As Fahey (2012) explains, “working back from the end point of teaching and learning moves planning away from content to outcomes and targets the development of essential ideas, content and skills in the long term.” To create a timeline with European explorers from the Age of Discovery and to assist students gain a global perspective, teaching ideas can be established to help achieve this goal.

Teaching ideas:

Have a discussion about British colonisating in Australia, why did they colonise Australia? What are some of the impacts of their settlement?

Show a video of European explorers such as Christopher Columbus can be shown to students in order to show that European exploration and colonisation occurred in Australia and in other countries. According to NSW Department of Education and Training (2007, p.9), students need to be able to go through the Information Process of defining, locating, selecting, organising, presenting and assessing to develop information literacy skills. Modelling and demonstrating how to locate and select reliable and accurate information will, “actively and explicitly assist students in skill development... the rate and quality of learning can be greatly increased” (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2007, p.9). 

In groups, students can research key events from Christopher Columbus, Vasco da Gama, Ferdinand Magellan, Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo or Juan Ponce de Leon’s voyages. As the Commonwealth of Australia (2008, p.14) describes, students need to “develop an understanding of different identities and perspectives expressed in oral, written and multimedia texts” when including a global perspective within the curriculum. What countries did they travel to? Why did they travel there? How did it impact on their society? As a numeracy strategy, students will be developing a historical timeline. Teachers can model how timelines can be ruled to scale.

Students will need to place the key dates and events on the timeline in chronological order. Historical terms such as place names should be used. Short descriptions of significant events should be included. Students also need to include the purpose of exploration. As Southwell (2007, p.3) explains, a “Clear and explicit assessment criteria allow students to show a depth of intellectual quality related to the learning they have been engaged in.”

 

References

Commonwealth of Australia. (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian Schools. Retrieved January 28, 2011 from http://www.globaleducation.edna.edu.au/globaled/go/pid/122

Fahey, C. (2012). “Planning for teaching and learning in geography and history”. In T. Taylor, C. Fahey, J.Kriewaldt & D. Boon (Eds). ‘Place and Time’ Frenches Forest: Pearson

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2007). Curriculum Support. Information skills in the school: engaging learners in constructing knowledge. Retrieved on 22nd April 2013 from NSW Department of Education and Training: http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/teachingideas/isp/docs/infoskills.pdf

Southwell, A. (2007). HSIE Curriculum Support. Planned Assessment in HSIE. New South Wales, Australia.

 

 

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How did Aboriginal Australians resist British colonisation?

This resource is a unit on the Aboriginal Resistance from the National Museum of Australia. This document includes case studies of four significant people, three of which students will study: Yagan, Fanny Balbuk and Bilin Bilin.

This resource is targeted at Stage 3 students, but the sentences and activities can be modified and the vocabulary simplified so Stage 2 students can both read and understand the content and task.

Teaching idea:

Students will need to work together in groups re-organise the information into a sequence which tells the story of the person in the case study. Students will organise the information in a flow chart. Graphic organisers such as flow charts allow students to “reflect on what they have learnt and to clarify gaps in knowledge” (Australian Catholic University, 2012, p.4). Students are then rearranged into groups ensuring that each student has worked on one of the case studies. According to the Australian Catholic University (2012, p.8), this Jigsaw activity “means that every student is both an expert and a receiver of knowledge... Students work together in groups to share their knowledge”.

Contact the school’s Aboriginal Education Officer and/or NSW AECG Inc. Arrange to discuss with them about inviting an Indigenous elder to talk about what type of resistance their ancestors and family participated in and how they reacted to British colonisation. This provides students with an Aboriginal perspective. 

After students have met and talked with the Indigenous elder, provide each student with a post-it note to write something they have learnt about the visit and stick it up on the whiteboard. Visible Thinking allows students to reflect and show what they have learnt and thought about. Teachers are also able to see students’ thinking, “misconceptions, prior knowledge, reasoning ability, and degrees of understanding are more likely to be uncovered. Teachers can then address these challenges and extend students' thinking by starting from where they are” (Visible Thinking).

Assessment:

Students could investigate what happened in terms of Aboriginal resistance in their home area and describe the events and achievements and the different points of view. And as a literacy strategy, students could present their finding in form of a report.

 

Reference:

 Australian Catholic University. (2012). Learning and Teaching Centre. Strategies for cooperative and collaborative learning in large lecture groups. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from Australian Catholic University: http://www.acu.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0003/405768/Large_Group_Lectures_LTC.pdf

National Museum of Australia. (2012, October). Resistance. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from National Museum of Australia: http://www.nma.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/18997/Aboriginal_resist_colonisation_colour_Oct2012.pdf

Visible Thinking. (n.d.). Why Make Thinking Visible. Retrieved April 15, 2013, from Visible Thinking: http://www.old-pz.gse.harvard.edu/vt/VisibleThinking_html_files/01_VisibleThinkingInAction/01b_WhyMake.html

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National Museum of Australia - First Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples gallery

National Museum of Australia - First Australians: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples gallery | "What fool would expect a proud man to forget, The land he fought to defend" | Scoop.it

This website provides information about the First Australians gallery at the National Museum of Australia. It includes displays from specific communities and features the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history from 1788. “The rationale for any excursion should reference the school's curriculum objectives and should be relevant to their achievement.” (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009, p.3). By visiting the First Australians gallery, students are able to become exposed to many stories from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. They are able to learn about the events, people and consequences of the British colonisation.

Teaching idea:

Take students on an excursion to the Resistance exhibit in the National Museum of Australia. This gallery includes stories of Indigenous resistance to British colonisation since 1770. These stories will include: Yagan, Fanny Balbuk and Bilin Bilin. Students will be able to learn more about these people.

When students arrive at the National Museum of Australia, students pick one person from the many stories from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives and answer:  who are they? Where did they live? How did they perceive British colonists? How did colonisation impact on their life?

Assessment:

Students pick from Maybanke Anderson, Arabanoo, Francis Greenway, Mary Lee, Arthur Phillip, Mary Reiby or James Ruse. Students conduct research on these significant people as well as the person they picked from their visit of the National Museum of Australia.

How did they interact with Indigenous Australians/British settlers? How did they perceive Indigenous Australians/British settlers? How did they feel about colonisation? As a numeracy strategy, a Venn diagram is used by students to compare and contrast between the two people. As Pampena (2012) explains, Venn diagrams are a tool which assists students in analysing content.

Evaluate the impact of colonisation on these people. Students will organise this information into a consequence chart and explain how British colonisation affected them. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p.104) suggests that “having students discuss and use terms like analyse, distinguish, compare, contrast, explain, verify, evaluate is part of a metacognitive approach to teaching and learning”. They explain how students will become better thinkers if we as teachers identified the specific strategy of thinking used before asking students to engage in them (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p.104).

Reference

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2009). Excursions Policy Implementation Procedures. Retrieved on 21st April 2013 from NSW Department of Education and Training: https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&ved=0CDYQFjAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.det.nsw.edu.au%2Fpolicies%2Fstudent_admin%2Fexcursions%2Fexcursion_pol%2Fproced.doc&ei=KQ91UZi4DILxiAfK9YGwCQ&usg=AFQjCNHt0KKOEPsF43zc_RAXVv3iGGBnpA&bvm=bv.45512109,d.aGc

Pampena, S. (2012). Australian Government. Literacy and Numeracy week 2012. Venn diagrams. Retrieved on 21st April 2013 from Australian Government. Literacy and Numeracy week 2012: http://literacyandnumeracy.gov.au/video/venn-diagrams-one-direction-and-simon-pampena

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