Aboriginal Languages
584 views | +0 today
Follow
Aboriginal Languages
Links to Aboriginal language resources with a particular focus on Noongar language and culture.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Reviving Australia's Indigenous Languages

Reviving Australia's Indigenous Languages | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
While most of Australia speaks English today, there was a time when hundreds of different languages were spoken across the continent.

Only around 20 indigenous languages are still spoken in Australia but teachers and linguists around the country are working to keep them alive, so that the next generation can speak the words of their ancestors.

Professor Jakelin Troy is the Director of the University of Sydney's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research Office. Professor Nicholas Evans is the Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Concern about the way Aboriginal language is taught in NSW Schools

Concern about the way Aboriginal language is taught in NSW Schools | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
"Rather than having an emphasis on reading and writing we need to have a greater emphasis on hearing, responding and speaking, because that's how we revitalise the language," he said.

"I have zero confidence that the Department of Education is able to produce proficient speakers but through the community we can produce people who speak the language very well."

"A well-known elder commented it felt like dispossession all over again," Mr Clarke said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

The sound of lost languages

The sound of lost languages | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
It's estimated that 300 Indigenous languages were once spoken in Australia. Many have no native speakers left, while others are endangered.

In the 80s and 90s, Adelaide University linguist Dr Ian Green travelled to communities in the Daly Region of the Northern Territory to record speakers of endangered languages.

\Associate Professor Rachel Nordlinger is the director of the Research Unit for Indigenous Language at Melbourne University and, more than 30 years after the original recordings were made, she's been travelling to the Daly region to return to those communities the recordings made by Dr Ian Green.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

‘My Grandmother’s Lingo’ illustrator pours personal passion into this unique new interactive

‘My Grandmother’s Lingo’ illustrator pours personal passion into this unique new interactive | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Jake, 25, is an illustrator, animator and director who, along with SBS and locals from the community of Ngukurr in Arnhem Land, have helped create SBS’s unique and powerful new interactive, My Grandmother’s Lingo.

Bringing to life the critically endangered Indigenous language of Marra, My Grandmother's Lingo aims to help preserve the language through a unique animated online game that is powered by the voice of the user.

The project was inspired by the words of Angelina Joshua, a local to the remote community of Ngukurr, on the Northern Territory’s Roper River, who is determinedly working to learn, preserve and pass on her language, of which there are only three fluent speakers left in her community.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Ya pulingina. Bringing these words to life is an extension of our identity

Ya pulingina. Bringing these words to life is an extension of our identity | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Fanny Cochrane Smith’s death was a terrible blow to Tasmania’s languages but, nearly a century later, the Pakana people decided to revive their native tongue
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Waking our sleeping Indigenous languages: we're in the midst of a resurgence

Waking our sleeping Indigenous languages: we're in the midst of a resurgence | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
While the vast number of Indigenous languages are considered endangered, there are many that have a good chance of survival if they are nurtured
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Born Digital: Indigenous voices | National Library of Australia

Born Digital: Indigenous voices | National Library of Australia | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it

Digital technology allows marginal communities to have a voice, challenging the dominance of imperialist power structures. What role can digital technology play in the preservation of Indigenous cultures in a postcolonial world?

Dr Rachael Ka’ai-Mahuta tells us why digital preservation is crucial to making sure that knowledge and information shared digitally by indigenous communities is collected, preserved and made accessible to future generations.

more...
Kate Reitzenstein's comment, August 9, 11:29 AM
Thanks Bhavneet for this great link!
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Nigel Scullion. “The Land is our Backbone.” Address to Garma 2016 - The Northern Myth

Nigel Scullion. “The Land is our Backbone.” Address to Garma 2016 - The Northern Myth | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
We must also make changes to broaden the education system – to recognise Indigenous Australia at the heart of the nation, and to make this a core area of studies for all.

It is my strong belief that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and history must be explored and explained in our schools.

Our Indigenous culture is at the heart of our nation, so Indigenous history and language needs to be at the heart of our curriculum if we are to educate students to be truly respectful and value our nation’s heritage.

I commit today to work with the Minister for Education, Simon Birmingham, state and territory governments, and communities and schools to ensure the Foundation to Year 10 curriculum is designed to enable all students to engage in reconciliation, respect and recognition of the world’s oldest continuous living cultures.

It should not only be those of us fortunate enough to attend events like Garma who have the chance to engage with this culture and language.

I look forward to the focus on Indigenous education being rolled out in schools across the country as a matter of priority.

As I said earlier, this year’s Garma theme – land is our backbone – rings so true to me.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

High demand for indigenous tourism — with great potential

High demand for indigenous tourism — with great potential | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it

In 1885 Swan River colonist George Fletcher Moore published the first attempted translation of the Noongar language to English.

Selections from it were published by The West Australian newspaper. Although his motivations were not purely altruistic, and his behaviour as an early citizen far from model, his work stands as a substantive record of Noongar indigenous spoken and behavioural culture in the mid 19th century.

Many more successful and respectful efforts have been made over ensuing years by concerned citizens, academics and Noongars to permanently enshrine and enliven the many, rich facets of their, and their fellow indigenous group’s culture, for the education and appreciation of all.

Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Click the title to read the full article

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Koori language brought to life at Melton West Primary School

Koori language brought to life at Melton West Primary School | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Mathew Gardiner beams with pride as he helps prep pupils with the sounds of the Woi Wurrung language, which has been “dormant” for several decades.

The Wurundjeri Willam man travels from Narre Warren South to Melton West Primary School twice a week to “revive and revitalise” his language.

“My language … has been ‘sleeping’ for so long,” Mr Gardiner says.

“It’s very important for me to bring it back and bring it alive.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Lynne Kelly: unlocking ancient memory storehouses

Lynne Kelly: unlocking ancient memory storehouses | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it

Lynne believes she's found a 'code' describing the way pre-literate peoples shared sophisticated knowledge. Lynne is a science writer who was researching the methods used by ancient cultures to retain vast amounts of information about animals and plants.

She was looking into the way knowledge was recorded through stories, song and dance.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Northern Australia’s new languages in the spotlight

Northern Australia’s new languages in the spotlight | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
University of Queensland linguists will join Aboriginal language experts in Katherine in the Northern Territory next week to workshop Australia’s largest newly adopted language – Kriol.

UQ’s School of Languages and Cultures researcher Dr Greg Dickson said Kriol was now the second most commonly spoken language in the Northern Territory, along with new languages such as Light Warlpiri and Gurindji Kriol.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

It's a great time to be teaching Indigenous Australian languages!  - ABC Splash -

It's a great time to be teaching Indigenous Australian languages!  - ABC Splash - | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Teaching First Australian languages does not diminish the importance of Indonesian, Chinese, French or other languages, because Indigenous languages aren't simply words and phrases that equip students to communicate overseas; our languages teach about the land itself. They're rich in philosophical reference and intimate knowledge of what it's like to be Australian on the Australian land.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

'Noongarpedia' bringing a vanishing language to the web

'Noongarpedia' bringing a vanishing language to the web | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
The online encyclopedia, Wikipedia, comes in around 200 different languages.

And now for the first time an Australian Aboriginal language Wikipedia page is being developed, in the Noongar language.

The Noongar people's country is the south-west of Western Australia. Their language is thousands of years old, but today not many people speak it.

The "Noongarpedia" project began a couple of years ago and, while it's still in its "incubatator" phase, it's hoped that it could revitalise a language that might otherwise be lost.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

2017 National NAIDOC Theme

2017 National NAIDOC Theme | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
National NAIDOC Committee Co-Chairs Anne Martin said languages are the breath of life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the theme will raise awareness of the status and importance of Indigenous languages across the country.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait languages are not just a means of communication, they express knowledge about everything: law, geography, history, family and human relationships, philosophy, religion, anatomy, childcare, health, caring for country, astronomy, biology and food.

“Each language is associated with an area of land and has a deep spiritual significance and it is through their own languages, that Indigenous nations maintain their connection with their ancestors, land and law,” Ms Martin said.

Committee Co-Chair Benjamin Mitchell hopes that the theme will shine a spotlight on the programs and community groups working to preserve, revitalise or record Indigenous languages, and encourage all Australians to notice the use of Indigenous languages in their community.

“There is currently a wave of activity, with people in many communities working to learn more about their language, and to ensure they are passed on to the next generation before it is too late.’ Mr Mitchell said.
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

This is so exciting. Now that we have a national framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages it is time to develop understanding among the wider community about the importance of teaching, maintain and reviving Aboriginal language for all Australians.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Word Up: Kylie Bracknell

Word Up: Kylie Bracknell | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
From Anmatyerre to Yorta Yorta, Word Up shares the diverse languages of black Australia - one word at a time.

Aboriginal language terms are often metaphors, with dual meaning.

For instance, the word for 'river' might also be the word for the Milky Way (which appears to flow like water) while the word for an expectant mother's belly might also translate to 'the future'.

This week, our guest is the actor and Nyungar speaker Kylie Bracknell.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Madjitil Moorna - Noongar Songs in Schools Project

The Noongar Songs in Schools Project began in 2015. The project sees young Noongar performers visiting schools to introduce songs in Noongar language, supported by elders and strong role models. Madjitil Moorna are currently seeking anyone who would be interested in working in schools, teaching Noongar songs as part of the Madjitil Moorna Noongar Songs in Schools Project?

 

They are excited to have funding for support and training of interested people - any age, Aboriginal, confident in culture and singing. When the workshop presenters know the songs, they can lead workshops as they crop up. They would present the workshop together with a more experienced presenter, always in pairs and using the MM Songbook and CD. This is paid work, on an occasional basis, contracted to Madjitil Moorna Inc.

 

If you would like to get involved, contact Jo at

www.madjitilmoorna.org.au

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kate Reitzenstein from Australian Indigenous Education - Centre for Aboriginal Studies
Scoop.it!

Why old theories on Indigenous counting just won't go away

Why old theories on Indigenous counting just won't go away | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
There is plenty of evidence to show Australia's Indigenous people had ways of counting big numbers, yet the myth persists they couldn't count more than a handful of things. Why?

Via Kim Flintoff
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

About Music Lecture - Clint Bracknell

As examples of language usage by fluent speakers and powerful symbols of cultural identity, recorded performances of ancestral Aboriginal vocal music not only hold inherent potential for enhancing the maintenance of endangered Aboriginal languages but can also contribute to the objectives of Aboriginal empowerment often sought by language revivalists. As memorising, singing, and enjoying a song is much easier than attaining fluency in a language, present community-directed research consolidating and recirculating songs in Nyungar, the language from the south-west of Western Australia, may help ensure that the sounds of Nyungar language continue to resonate throughout the region.


Clint Bracknell is a Senior Lecturer for the Division of Architecture and Creative Arts, based at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and the Arts Music Unit, University of Sydney. His major research focus centres on Aboriginal Australian music and languages, exploring the links between emerging technologies and Indigenous creative futures. A musician, composer and educator, he was nominated for ‘Best Original Score’ in the 2012 Helpmann Awards and has received secondary and tertiary teaching awards. His Nyungar cultural elders from the south coast of Western Australia use the term ‘Wirlomin’ to refer to their clan.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Sonnets in Noongar – The Task - Runway

Sonnets in Noongar – The Task - Runway | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
In ‘April 2012’, Yirra Yaakin Theatre Company presented six of Shakespeare’s sonnets in the ancient Aboriginal language of Western Australia’s southwest –the Noongar language – at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London. Yirra Yaakin also presented Sonnets in Noongar at the 2013 Perth International Arts Festival and this year the work has spawned a school education program. Adapting Shakespearean language to an Aboriginal Australian language for performance could be interpreted as a politically charged act. Giving voice to the words of the colonists’ great bard on his own London stage as colonised people using our own endangered language certainly draws attention to Aboriginal Australia and the legacy of British invasion.

More importantly though, Sonnets in Noongar was, and remains a very rare opportunity for Noongar people and the general public to actively engage with the Noongar language. Many of the hundreds of Aboriginal languages across Australia are either severely endangered or ‘sleeping’, not currently spoken by the people they belong to. The term ‘Noongar’ is used today to describe the people, culture and language of the large southwest region of Western Australia.[2] Over 30,000 people identify as Noongar, making it one of Australia’s largest Aboriginal cultural groups.[3] However, less than four hundred Noongar people in the last Australian census reported that they use the Noongar language. As one of those four hundred people, I remain eager to help boost the number of active Noongar speakers. Working as a writer, translator, lead facilitator and performer on the Sonnets in Noongar project, I have been able to channel creative energies into a cause close to my heart. In adapting and performing these sonnets I have applied a long-term, community-based method of working with my own endangered Aboriginal language, helping to raising its profile and support its transmission.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

My WA: Story books in Aboriginal English - Kondinin

Working together using a two way approach to teaching, an experienced writer, Aboriginal students, communities and local Aboriginal organisations have developed culturally and contextually appropriate story books in Aboriginal English. The project was informed by the Department’s Aboriginal Cultural Standards Framework.

Kondinin Community is a small town located three hours east of Perth in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia. Kondinin has a proud history, extending back into time before farming began over a century ago. The strong Aboriginal population includes significant Elders with extensive family spread all over WA.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

WA school helping to close the education gap

WA school helping to close the education gap | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Chair of the Steering Committee, June Oscar, who played a crucial role in the establishment of the school, said the program was uniting Australians and creating a more productive society.

"One that respects the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander world views and the heritages and languages of this country," she said.

"We can together shape a tomorrow that a looks a lot better than yesterday."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Cultural revivalism: Vicki Couzens

Cultural revivalism: Vicki Couzens | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
Vicki Couzens might be described as a cultural revivalist.

Her multiform artistic practice is as much about reviving Gunditjmara and Kirrae Whurrung language and tradition as about making contemporary art.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Living Black: S18 Ep9 - Linguicide

Australia is a world record holder in "linguicide", according to one prominent linguist, who says that ninety three percent of Indigenous languages have now died. But in the Eyre Peninsula, there are efforts being made to revive the endangered Barngarla language. Andy Park reports.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kate Reitzenstein
Scoop.it!

Why Every Aussie Should Learn To Speak An Indigenous Australian Language

Why Every Aussie Should Learn To Speak An Indigenous Australian Language | Aboriginal Languages | Scoop.it
I’m not racist, but it seems a crying shame that we don’t ensure that every Australian child in every Australian school learns an Australian language. Last year less than a dozen Year 12 students across the country studied an Australian language. Could you imagine children in England not learning English?
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Edi Maher is a trailblazer with 7 of her students studying Wajari up to Year 12. My dream is to see Noongar and other WA Aboriginal languages being taught up to Year 12 level. Every tertiary institution should offer the language of Country it is located on.

more...
No comment yet.