Aboriginal Dreaming stories as a reflection of the creation of Australia
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Little Red Yellow Black Site

Lauren Fysh's insight:

 

 

The Little Red Yellow Black Site is a fantastic website for teachers as it contains a wide range of information about Aboriginal issues and traditions. It also contains a very valuable teacher resource taken from the Educational Resource section which contains a wealth of information and considerations for teachers when teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander studies.

The resource covers a range of ideas, not just Aboriginal dreaming and prepares teachers about a number of cultural sensitivities they should be aware of before beginning this unit. Not only does the resource prepare teachers, but provides an array of activities for Primary stages based on the topics ‘Who are We’, ‘Culture and sport’, ‘Participation and Governance’ and ‘Resistance and Reconciliation’ that support the NSW syllabus for Aboriginal studies.

 

Teaching idea:

When looking at the topic ‘Who are We’, teachers could invite an elder from the local Indigenous community to come in and speak to the ES1 learners about dreamtime stories and traditions that have been passed down through the generations. They can also share what these stories mean in terms of the land and the way people respect and treat each other. This has the potential to then lead in to a unit of work on ‘Who am I’ looking at the cultural backgrounds and traditions of members of the class, and considering how these elements of their own identity are transmitted through generations. Students could also discuss whether their family or cultural traditions similar to those told by the Aboriginal elder and why.

 

Assessment:

Teachers could assess students by asking them to make a short oral presentation to the class on a couple of facts about the traditions of their own family.

 

Literacy link:

This supports talking and listening skills from literacy.

 

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Video -- Aboriginal Rock Art -- National Geographic

Ancient Aboriginal people made paintings on rock walls in Australia. Take a look and see what story they were trying to tell.
Lauren Fysh's insight:

The National Geographic Rock Art video explores the nature of Aboriginal dreaming and creation through rock art and is an example of a global perspective of Indigenous culture told by American people. It is important to include a global perspective in teaching in order to discuss whether issues have been fairly and accurately represented in a wider society context and positive and responsible values and attitudes for learning have prevailed (Australian Government, 2008). Students will be able to take this global perspective of Aboriginal rock art and the dreaming and compare it with the voices and works of their local Indigenous community.

 

Teaching idea:

Teachers could introduce this clip to students looking at some of the features of rock art, and then discuss whether they have seen any examples in their own lives. The teacher could bring in photos of Aboriginal rock art and ask children to try and identify some of the features and what they may represent. Compare possible answers to a chart of Aboriginal art symbols. Students could then attempt to use some of the Aboriginal artwork symbols discussed to create their own piece of art.

 

Assessment:

This can be done during classroom discussion monitoring who is able to talk about the art work they have just seen and any features, as well as looking at to see if symbols have been transmitted into their own artwork.

 

Literacy link:

This supports talking and listening outcomes in the literacy syllabus- TES1.2 Demonstrates basic skills of classroom and group interaction, makes brief oral presentations and listens with attentiveness.

 

Australian Government. (2008). Global Perspectives: A Framework for Global Education in Australian Schools. Retrieved April 18, 2013 from http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/GPS_web.pdf

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The Rainbow Serpent

Aboriginal Dreamtime Stories, Story by Dick Roughsey, Narrration by David Gulpilil, Soundtrack by Andrew Vial Photographed and edited by Alexander Cochran, A...
Lauren Fysh's insight:

 

The rainbow Serpent is a very famous and traditional dreamtime story that illustrates the role of the Rainbow Serpent in creating the landscape of Australia. This would be a great resource to show students in the classroom on the interactive whiteboard as the animations are interactive and is supported by an oral reading by an Indigenous person.

 

Teaching idea:

At the end of the clip, the class could together create a recount of the story, with the teacher writing these notes up on the board and discussing the meanings of unknown words. The teacher should also ask students what the difference is between a dream and Aboriginal dreaming to ensure that students understand a deeper meaning behind the clip. Students could then choose their favourite scene from the book and draw an illustration representing this. The class could come together again to order their representations with each child sharing features of their drawing with the class. If able, students could label features of their drawing. 

 

Assessment:

 Listen to students ideas about the important features in creating a recount, as well as when discussing the difference between a dream and an Aboriginal dreaming story.  Look at whether students were able to share their work with the class and label any features.

 

Literacy link:

This would link in with early stage one literacy outcomes TES1.2 -Demonstrates basic skills of classroom and group interaction, makes brief oral presentations and listens with reasonable attentiveness and WES1.9- Engages in writing texts with the intention of conveying an idea or message. 

 

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Story_to_big_book_pp116_13.pdf

Lauren Fysh's insight:

This is a quality resource due to its clear and consistent links to Australian curriculum that are appropriate for primary levels, as well as its range of useful teaching ideas. The resource is teacher focused and explores a range of ways to link ideas of Aboriginal dreaming and creation in with critical thinking, literacy and the arts. From Story to Big Book is particularly useful to read before reading and sharing dreamtime stories with a class as it provides teachers with an insight into the pre planning involved, and after reading as it provides many key literacy activities with direct links to Aboriginal dreamtime stories. Whilst the resource can be used to support a wide range of texts, it also contains activities and planning for specific Aboriginal Dreamtime books, with reference to and ideas for many others. It is also a valuable resource as it provides teaching ideas that can be adapted to suit many grade levels, differing dreamtime stories and individual students’ learning needs.

 

Teaching idea:

One key teaching idea is making a glossary of words together as a class after reading the suggested text, The Milky Way and discussing their meanings in relation to Aboriginal dreaming stories. The students could then be given the opportunity to draw a picture to match a word as a reminder of its meaning. This is critical, especially for ES1 as students will not gain any knowledge if they do not understand the words or meaning throughout the stories. Research by Collins (2012) suggests that “discussing words with children prompts their active involvement and provide teachers with information about children’s evolving lexicons” and provides more information about a child’s vocabulary development than tests.

 

Assessment:

Teachers could assess students’ knowledge by writing a glossary for the classroom wall, asking students throughout the week to describe some of the meanings of the words they previously discussed and share their picture with the class.

 

Literacy link:

Supporting literacy reading outcome RES1.6- Draws on an increasing range of skills and strategies when reading and comprehending texts

 

Collins, M.F. (2012). Sagacious, Sophisticated, and Sedulous: The Importance of Discussing 50-Cent Words with Preschoolers. Young Children. 2(3). 1-6. Retrieved from https://www.naeyc.org/yc/files/yc/file/201211/YCCollins.pdf

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Dust Echoes: Ancient Stories, New Voices

Dust Echoes: Ancient Stories, New Voices | Aboriginal Dreaming stories as a reflection of the creation of Australia | Scoop.it
Ancient Stories, New Voices. Dust Echoes is a series of twelve animated dreamtime stories from Central Arnhem Land in Northern Australia
Lauren Fysh's insight:

 

A powerful and engaging resource for students and teachers, Dust settles, ancient stories, new voices provides a valuable insight into Aboriginal Dreaming and the creation of Australia. This resource provides some useful dreamtime stories for students of early stage one, but is most notable for its Dust Echoes Study Guides for teachers.

 The stories told not only represent how Australia’s physical landscape was formed, but engage followers in morals, traditions and Aboriginal ways of life on the land.  The study guides are useful to use in a classroom for any Aboriginal dreaming story that is appropriate for ES1 to discuss how the story helps us understand Aboriginal life and society through traditional themes such as food, work, family, rules, education and relationships with others. Along with teaching ideas, the document provides an array of information about Aboriginal life and culture which aims to inform teachers before they begin work with their class

 

Teaching idea:

One teaching idea is to choose a specific dreaming story from the site, write 6 simple sentences about the main points of the story, cut them out and stick them on the board with blue tac.  Students watch the clip, then the teacher reads these sentences outloud asking individual students to come up and put them in order.  The teacher reads them out as the class decides what order they go in, encouraging students to talk about what happened in the story.  If time permits, students can draw a picture to go with the story afterwards.

 

Assessment:

Assess students as they volunteer information about critical events from the story and look at which students were able to sequence these correctly.

 

Literacy and numeracy link:

This supports talking and listening outcomes from the English syllabus as well as measurement outcome MES1.5- sequences events and uses everyday language to describe the duration of activities.

 

 

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Shannon Pulver's curator insight, November 10, 2013 6:04 PM

Dreamtime stories that Indigenous Australians belive to reflect the creation of the world.

Geoffrey King's curator insight, April 12, 2014 1:10 AM

A series of stories that reflect the aboriginal perspective on landscape and human history