Aboriginal Dreaming: Creation of the world and Natural Phenomena
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A Journey into the Dreamtime

A Journey into the Dreamtime | Aboriginal Dreaming: Creation of the world and Natural Phenomena | Scoop.it
>the worlds largest gallery of aboriginal art with the most comprhensive collection of aboriginal painting outside of australia, with gallerys in san francisco and amsterdam. our aim is to promote aboriginal art and culture on a worldwide basis. contains over a thousand images of aboriginal artists, paintings, australia's breathtaking landscape, essays on aboriginal life and culture. this site produced by demolition graphics (www.demolitiongraphics.com)
Sophie E's insight:

A Journey into the Dreamtime is an extremely useful teaching resource as it offers a clear and thorough account of the origin of dreaming.  The site enables teachers to gain a great understanding of Aboriginal beliefs about creation and the environment (ENS3.6).   This covers the professional standard of understanding the content of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures (2.4.1).  The site also contains several valuable teaching resources including artworks, images of didgeridoos, sacred sites, bark paintings and artefacts which can be utilised in the classroom as visual aids to enable students to gain a deeper understanding of Aboriginal dreaming and culture (2.6.2).

 

The site is a valuable resource for teaching stage 3 as it offers some complex language which will enable students to enhance their comprehension skills (Spence 2004).  Furthermore the use of a website as a teaching tool is a much more flexible way to teach and learn. This idea is supported by Lee, Jor and Lai (2005) who observed that websites “facilitate synchronous communication, language learning and self-learning because of its flexibility in learning and choice of optional materials” (p8).

 

Teaching Idea:

The teacher could instruct the students to read a paragraph each aloud to the class in order to engage them and become more proficient in their public speaking.  This class activity aligns with the professional teaching standard of supporting inclusive student participation and engagement in classroom activities (4.1.1).  After the reading the teacher could instruct the students to explore the website on their own computers looking at the artefacts and artworks the site offers.  A class discussion could follow this exercise analysing the different features of Aboriginal art and how the art reflects Aboriginal views on creationism and the environment.

 

Assessment:

The teacher could ask the students to look through the artworks and read the excerpts that explain the paintings.  Students could then pick a painting to copy and then present their work to the class explaining what their artwork is depicting. 

 

Literacy outcomes:

TS3.4: Evaluates the organisational patterns of some more challenging spoken texts and some characteristic language features.

TS3.2: Interacts productively and with autonomy in pairs and groups of various sizes and composition, uses effective oral presentation skills and strategies and listens attentively

RS3.5: Reads independently an extensive range of texts with increasing content demands and responds to themes and issues.

RS3.6: Uses a comprehensive range of skills and strategies appropriate to the type of text being read.

 

References

Spence B. (2004). Reading aloud to children Pen146. Newtown: PETAA.

Lee C., Jor G., Lai E. (2005). Web-based Teaching and English Language Teaching: A Hong Kong Experience. Hong Kong: The Chinese University of Hong Kong Press.

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The Rainbow Serpent - YouTube

Aboriginal Dreamtime Stories, Story by Dick Roughsey, Narrration by David Gulpilil, Soundtrack by Andrew Vial Photographed and edited by Alexander Cochran, A...
Sophie E's insight:

The Rainbow Serpent is an engaging source that encapsulates Aboriginal Dreaming of the creation of the environment (ENS3.6).  The Rainbow Serpent tells the story of a giant mythical serpent who ruled the earth at the beginning of time and created the Australian landscape. The film includes a detailed account of the dreaming story as told by an Indigenous Australian and includes several Aboriginal dreaming artworks.  This resource is an extremely effective teaching tool as it tells the quinte essential Aboriginal Dreaming story of creation of the environment through an engaging resource (Professional standard 3.4.2).

 

Teaching Idea:

The teacher could produce a reader’s theatre script of the dreamtime story and ask some students to volunteer to perform the script back to the class.  The use of role play in the classroom complies with Australian Professional Standards for teaching as it offers an alternative learning strategy to support student engagement (3.5.1).  Additionally the use of role play is an effective teaching tool as it allows students to obtain a better understanding of people, perspectives and events (Starko 2014).  Furthermore role plays are beneficial as they generate enthusiasm and can be highly engaging.

 

Assessment

To reflect on the student’s learning, the teacher can instruct the class to complete a worksheet that has all the different points of the story in an incorrect order.  To complete the worksheet, students must number the plot points in the correct order.  Additionally, the worksheet should include questions that enable the students to evaluate the themes and issues in the story.  Questions could include:  Explain what the Dreamtime is?, Why do people like to belong in a group? Draw two images depicting scenes before and after the rainbow serpent’s journey.

 

Literacy Outcomes:

 CUS3.3: Describes different cultural influences and their contribution to Australian identities.

TS3.2: Interacts productively and with autonomy in pairs and groups of various sizes and composition, uses effective oral presentation skills and strategies and listens attentively. 

 

References

 

Starko, A. (2014). Creativity in the Classroom: Schools of Curious Delight. Routeledge. Oxon. 

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Dust Echoes: Ancient Stories, New Voices

Dust Echoes: Ancient Stories, New Voices | Aboriginal Dreaming: Creation of the world and Natural Phenomena | Scoop.it
Ancient Stories, New Voices. Dust Echoes is a series of twelve animated dreamtime stories from Central Arnhem Land in Northern Australia
Sophie E's insight:

This site is a fantastic resource for teachers and students in stage 3.  Dust echoes includes 12 animated aboriginal dreaming stories that touch on issues such as love, loyalty, duty to country, aboriginal custom and law.  The site provides great insight into Aboriginal Dreaming and illustrates indigenous culture’s deep connection with the land (ENS3.6).  Dust Echos also offers extremely useful teachers guides with suggested student activities, student worksheets and overviews of the different stories.  Use of this site fits in with the professional teaching standard of 3.4.2 which prompts teachers to use a range of resources including ICT to engage students in learning.

 

Using animation in teaching is an extremely effective tool as it offers a pedagogical experience that is much more sensory and therefore offers a more powerful learning experience.  This is supported by Russell (2009) who argued that film is an extremely effective communicator and has the potential to arouse emotions.  Additionally by using this alternative teaching strategy, students with different capabilities are able to learn at their own pace (1.5.2).

 

Teaching Idea:

The short animation ‘The Wagalak Sisters’ could be shown to the students in order to demonstrate Aboriginal Dreaming’s explanations of natural phenomena.  After showing the film the teacher could lead a class discussion that illustrates the issues put forth by the narrative.  Answers could include: danger, relationships, identity, natural events and behaviour.  Further questions could address how Aboriginal Dreaming explains natural phenomena and creation.

 

Assessment:

Students could complete worksheets that illustrate their understanding of the story of the Wagalak sisters.  Questions on the sheet could include: Why did they leave their dilly bags in the tree? How did the animator depict the dreamtime figures? What happened to the sisters when they lost their power?

 

Literacy Outcomes:

WS3.9: Produces a wide range of well-structured and well-presented literary and factual texts for a wide variety of purposes and audiences using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and written language features. 

 

References

Russel, W. (2009). Teaching Social Issues with Film. Information Age Publishing Inc. United States of America.

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Dreamtime of the Aborigines - Ancient Civilizations - YouTube

http://www.thehistoryexplorer.com/product/dreamtime-of-the-aborigines/ The first inhabitants of Australia and keepers of the oldest continuous culture in the...
Sophie E's insight:

Dreamtime of the Aboriginies provides a succinct overview of the dreaming and encapsulates how Aboriginals habituate and value their environment.  The short documentary offers information on environmental features of Australia, survival skills adopted and religious beliefs about the environment.   The source is a useful teaching resource as it is at the appropriate level for stage 3 and is highly engaging and concise.  The use of this documentary in the classroom covers the professional standard of 2.6.2 as it integrates ICT into learning programs to make selected content meaningful.

 

Teaching Idea:

The teacher could present the film to the students and then instruct them to complete a work sheet in order to reflect on the film.  Worksheets are a useful teaching tool as they enable students to compile a structured reflection of their new knowledge.  Worksheets address the professional standard of 3.2.2 which prompts teachers to implement structured teaching and learning programs to engage students.

 

Assessment:

In order to gauge the students learning, questions on the worksheets should be directed to the content of the film and also draw on the student’s broader knowledge of Aboriginal Dreaming. Some questions could include: According to ancient Aboriginal Dreaming, how did the landscape come into being?, What harsh weather conditions do the Aboriginal people in the documentary endure in the outback?, What regions of Australia do Aboriginal people habitate?  As argued by Buehl (2008) the use of worksheets provides students with a well organised visual display and “engages students in the crucial comprehension process of synthesising understanding” (p170).

 

Literacy Outcomes:

 WS3.9: Produces a wide range of well-structured and well-presented literary and factual texts for a wide variety of purposes and audiences using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and written language features.


References

 

Buehl, D. (2008). Classroom Strategies for Interactive Learning. United States of America: International Reading Association.

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Creation Story of the Maya | Living Maya Time

Creation Story of the Maya | Living Maya Time | Aboriginal Dreaming: Creation of the world and Natural Phenomena | Scoop.it
Sophie E's insight:

This site can be used as a comparative study when learning about Aboriginal Dreaming and the environment.  A asserted by Mestre and Ross (2011) during comparative studies
“people notice potentially relevant features in two unfamiliar examples by identifying their similarities and focusing on and making sense of these similarities” (p213).  Therefore students can reinforce their understanding of Aboriginal Dreaming and the environment by broadening their knowledge of global perspectives.  The use of this website when learning about dreaming also allows students to develop an understanding of the interconnectedness between Australia and global environments (ENS3.5).

 

Teaching Idea:

Students could watch the film Creation Story of the Maya and read the accompanying excerpt.  The teacher could then brainstorm with the class and write the student’s thoughts on the board about the similarities and differences Mayan mythology has to Aboriginal Dreaming of creation.

 

Assessment:

To assess the student’s knowledge on Aboriginal Dreaming in comparison to this case study, the teacher could ask the students to create their own mind map poster using a computer that illustrates the similarities and differences between the two indigenous cultures.  The use of technology in the task aligns with the professional teaching standard of incorporating strategies to promote the use of ICT in learning and teaching (4.5.2).  Mind maps are a useful learning tool as they allow for learners to connect ideas and navigate difficult concepts with greater ease (Buehl 2008).  By comparing the two perspectives students can notice common values and beliefs held by indigenous communities in relation to the environment (ENS3.6).

 

Literacy Outcomes:

 WS3.9: Produces a wide range of well-structured and well-presented literary and factual texts for a wide variety of purposes and audiences using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and written language features.

WS3.12: Produces texts in a fluent and legible style and uses computer technology to present these effectively in a variety of ways.

TS3.2: Interacts productively and with autonomy in pairs and groups of various sizes and composition, uses effective oral presentation skills and strategies and listens attentively.


References

 

Buehl, D. (2008). Classroom Strategies for Interactive Learning. United States of America: International Reading Association.

Mestre, J., Ross, B. (2011).  The Psychology of Learning and Motivation: Cognition in Education. United States of America: Elsevier.

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