Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture
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Aboriginal health service will have to find millions to offset GP co-payment - Sydney Morning Herald

Aboriginal health service will have to find millions to offset GP co-payment - Sydney Morning Herald | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning Herald Aboriginal health service will have to find millions to offset GP co-payment Sydney Morning Herald The largest Aboriginal medical service in the Northern Territory warns the federal government's $7 GP co-payment policy will...

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Courageous Conversations About Race - Dr. Glenn Singleton | SV/SJ 2020 Symposium

Courageous Conversations About Race - Dr. Glenn Singleton | SV/SJ 2020 Symposium | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it

March 13, 2014 and
May 20, 2014
Dr. Glenn Singleton
Courageous Conversations about Race

"Educators are acutely aware of the statistical gaps in achievement between different racial groups. Considering the rapidly changing racial composition of student populations, how can educators reach a level of cultural proficiency necessary to eliminate this disparity. Examining the achievement gap through the prism of race, Dr. Glenn Singleton explains the need for candid, courageous conversations about race so that educators may understand why performance inequity persists, and learn how they can develop a curriculum that promotes true academic parity. Only when educators have established both a language and a process for addressing the intersection of race and achievement will they be able to restructure their schools in ways which improve student performance and fulfill the promise that every child has the right to learn regardless of their race, culture or class."

 

For more information and registration, click title above or here:

http://santaclara.k12oms.org/eventdetail.php?id=79442&nbsp


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Social media is improving health literacy in Australia's indigenous population

Social media is improving health literacy in Australia's indigenous population | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it

Around the world, social media is a disrupting and transforming force, bringing new opportunities for innovation and participation.1 In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have developed resources to provide guidance on using social media in health communication.2 In the United Kingdom, the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement encouraged its staff to explore the potential of using social media to transform care and staff engagement.

 

In Australia, the Indigenous health sector has been at the forefront of innovative use of social media for advocacy, public health promotion and community development. Two striking examples are the Lowitja Institute’s nuanced explanation of knowledge exchange from Indigenous perspectives4and the Healing Foundation’s engaging explanation of the impact of colonisation on Indigenous health.

 

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) was an early adopter of social media, and finds it a valuable advocacy tool, according to its Chair, Justin Mohamed. It distributes daily Aboriginal health news alerts via social media. Mohamed says downloads of NACCHO’s policy submissions have increased since they have been promoted on Twitter and other online channels.

 

The popularity of user-generated content — a hallmark of social media — is being harnessed in new tobacco control programs. These include the No Smokes campaign from the Menzies School of Health Research and the Rewrite Your Story initiative by Nunkuwarrin Yunti (a community-controlled service). In New South Wales, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council uses Facebook to promote sexual health and smoking cessation.

While the digital divide is thought to be an issue relevant to remote and hard-to-reach communities, social media has been successfully used in the Torres Strait Islands to connect young people with a public health initiative in sexual health — the Kasa Por Yarn (“just for a chat”) campaign, funded by Queensland Health. Unpublished data show that Facebook, YouTube and text messaging were effective in reaching the target audience of 15–24-year-olds (Heather Robertson, Senior Network Project Officer, Cairns Public Health Unit, Queensland Health, personal communication). Patricia Fagan, a public health physician who oversaw the campaign, says that social media helped increase its reach. The campaign was using tools with appeal to young people, and, importantly, “it didn’t feel like health, it felt like socialising”. Heather Robertson, the project leader, says engaging local writers, musicians and actors in developing campaign messages and social media content was also important.

 

Social media has also been used to increase engagement with the Heuristic Interactive Technology network (HITnet), which provides touch-screen kiosks in Indigenous communities and in prisons. The kiosks embed health messages in culturally based digital storytelling. Helen Travers, Director of Creative Production and Marketing for HITnet, says this has brought wider health benefits, by developing the content-creation skills of communities. “The exciting thing for health promotion is that this kind of work is increasing digital literacy and digital inclusion”, she says.

 

Social media’s facilitation of citizen-generated movements is exemplified by the @IndigenousX Twitter account, where a different Indigenous person tweets every week, enabling many health-related discussions.

 

Innovation in service development is also being informed by the anti-hierarchical, decentralised nature of social media. The Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre is developing virtual mental health resources for Indigenous youth in remote communities. The centre’s Chief Executive Officer, Jane Burns, envisages that these will resemble a social network more than a health care intervention, and will link young people and their health care providers with online collection of data about sleep, weight, physical activity and related measures. Burns says, “It really is . . . creating a new mental health service, a new way of doing things that empowers the individual, rather than being that top-down service delivery approach”.

 

However, barriers to wider use of social media exist. Burns says that upskilling health professionals is critical. Kishan Kariippanon, a former paediatric physician studying social media and mobile phone use among youth in the Yirrkala community in Arnhem Land, says health professionals need support and encouragement to engage more creatively with technological innovations. He would like to see regular “hackathons” to bring together programmers, health professionals, innovators and community members to encourage “out of the box” thinking


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KaitlynandSydney's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:19 PM

This article fits into the social category because it talks about how social media is helping promote health issues

Kiann and Kenneth's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:27 PM

This article relates to the socal interaction in Australia.

 

Social Media in Australia is popular. Social websites like twitter, Facebook, YouTube and more. Social media is changing our health in the way you sleep, your weight, and physical activity.

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, October 4, 2013 1:22 PM

Social media ia disrupting a big in AustraliaAustralia

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Research centre funded to bring fresh approach to Indigenous health gap - ABC Online

Research centre funded to bring fresh approach to Indigenous health gap - ABC Online | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
Research centre funded to bring fresh approach to Indigenous health gap ABC Online Researchers at a new national centre will work with health providers in Indigenous communities to reduce the impact of chronic disease and attempt to explain why...

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Accidental white heroes of Aboriginal culture - Eureka Street

Accidental white heroes of Aboriginal culture - Eureka Street | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
A Yankunytjajara elder has damned a current 'songlines' anthropological study, declaring that 'white do-gooders need their boundaries defined'.

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NACCHO MJA social media news: Aboriginal health at forefront of innovative use of social media for advocacy

NACCHO MJA social media news: Aboriginal health at forefront of innovative use of social media for advocacy | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) was an early adopter of social media, and finds it a valuable advocacy tool, according to its Chair, Justin Mohamed. (Curre...

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Indigenous Innovation Unconference - presented by SIBSYD & NCIE

Indigenous Innovation Unconference - presented by SIBSYD & NCIE | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
 
What: Indigenous Innovation UnconferenceWhere: National Centre of Indigenous Excellence, 180 George St, Redfern, NSW 2016.
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A Roadmap and Best Practices for Organizations to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care - Springer

A Roadmap and Best Practices for Organizations to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care - Springer | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it

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Hung The Nguyen's curator insight, January 24, 2013 8:22 PM

This systemic review demonstrate to us that we know a lot about what works when caring for people from different cultures.  Taking action is required based on best practice and evidence in multicultural health.

This article is free to download.

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Recording Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Status Segment 2 of 3


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Hung The Nguyen's curator insight, May 17, 2013 7:02 AM

Contains role plays.

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Australian Indigneous Health within an International Context Report


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Hung The Nguyen's curator insight, June 16, 2013 7:40 PM

Indigenous health is not unique to Australia nor is it unique to Canada and the USA as is reported in this report.  Most countries of the world have indigenous peoples who are generally the minority group with poor health status.  Themes of why they have poorer health outcomes are consistent across the board.  

This report of course focus on 3 developed wealthy countries with a colonising history and compares the differences and similarities of how we attend (or not) to our indigenous peoples.  Any discussion of the big issues on indigenous health require comparative study; to understand the systemic issues, successive policies and processes from government downwards to instiutiuonal, organisational behaviours that contribute, maintains and perpetuates the contemporary state of affairs for indigenous communities.

This report sets out to do this which can be utilised to initiate a discussion with health students on broader issues in indignoeus health.

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Experiences of non-resident nurses in Australia’s remote Northern Territory


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Hung The Nguyen's curator insight, July 22, 2013 1:44 AM

A worthy read and reflection on how we manage learners who are not resident in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities eg health professionals holding regular clinics in remote communities from their base clinic or hospitals.  Non-resident health professionals has reduced opportunities to build relationships with the community and perhaps the patients and staff because most people socialise outside the pt-clinican context ie after hours, weekends, special community events.  But the clinicians credibility as a professional and a person is important for patient care in this cross-cultrual context.

Being aware of these issue help teachers and training organisation plan the placement, community engagement activities, cultural immersion activities, assess trainee health and well-being and provide just in case and just in time support so thay can have sustained and meaningful work and learning in this non-resident health professional role.

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Cultural Sensitivity

Article by Joshua C. Henson
I will be discussing cultural sensitivity and more specifically cultural competency.

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SAP's $1m boost to indigenous scholarships - The Australian

SAP's $1m boost to indigenous scholarships - The Australian | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
SAP's $1m boost to indigenous scholarships The Australian THE Australian Indigenous Education Foundation can already name Australia's largest corporations, such as BHP Billiton, Commonwealth Bank and Qantas, as among its backers, but the latest...

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Poor Cancer Survival in Indigenous Children - Report | Pro Bono ...

Poor Cancer Survival in Indigenous Children - Report | Pro Bono ... | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
Indigenous Australian children are 36 per cent more likely to die within five years of a cancer diagnosis than non-Indigenous Australian children, a landmark report has found. Released on national Close the Gap day, (March ...

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Aboriginal Images - A Cultural Lesson for Years 3/4 - Australian Curriculum Lessons

Aboriginal Images - A Cultural Lesson for Years 3/4 - Australian Curriculum Lessons | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
Summary: Students will analyse an Aboriginal Image. They will use their detective skills to work out what is happening in each image.

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:33 AM

Important note:The following lesson could be enhanced by acknowledging the sources of the images as part of the lesson procedure, therefore modelling best practice in crediting your source. Also some of the images have been taken out of the context of their original website. This is a teaching point that could be shared with your students, ie the pros and cons of 'googling' for images...

Maree Whiteley's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:46 AM

Please see comment below...

Jamie Mitchell's curator insight, March 8, 1:10 AM

Important note:The following lesson could be enhanced by acknowledging the sources of the images as part of the lesson procedure, therefore modelling best practice in crediting your source. Also some of the images have been taken out of the context of their original website. This is a teaching point that could be shared with your students, ie the pros and cons of 'googling' for images...

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Colour, culture and freedom of identity - Eureka Street

Colour, culture and freedom of identity - Eureka Street | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
I am deeply proud of my Aboriginal friend, who is now a doctor. I have not had the heart to tell her that once she was judged for not being dark enough to be awarded an Indigenous scholarship.

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Eight Aboriginal Ways of Learning at newlearningonline

Eight Aboriginal Ways of Learning at newlearningonline | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
Teaching As Reflective And Collaborative Practice

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Linking you into the new National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan – and some of the reaction –

Linking you into the new National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan – and some of the reaction – | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
The importance of tackling racism and addressing the social determinants of health are central features of the new National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023.

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Rescooped by Julie Rogers from Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
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Web Resources for Indigenous Australian Health

Web Resources for Indigenous Australian Health | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it

This webpage has been created to provide links to useful resources on the Web relating to Indigenous Australian Health.  Regularly updated, it includes links to government statistics and reports, and summary papers from a range of Australian health organisations and government agencies.

 

 


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Chrissy Freestone's curator insight, June 12, 2013 12:48 AM

Image: "Banksia" by Peter Ostergaard

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Culturemate | cross cultural training | culturally competent practice

Culturemate | cross cultural training | culturally competent practice | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it
CultureMate is a portal to online information for industry sectors providing training and resources to increase users' cross cultural competence.

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Hung The Nguyen's curator insight, February 26, 2013 5:25 AM

An interactive online cultural competence product for health professionals.  Useful up-to-date information on many cultural groups in Australia.  Does require a subscription for individuals or organisations.

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Recording Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Status segment 1 of 3.mpg

"VACCHO in collaboration with Mungabareena Aboriginal Cooperative and Rumbalara Aboriginal Cooperative have developed a series of three videos about quality ...

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Why White People Don’t Feel Black People’s Pain

Why White People Don’t Feel Black People’s Pain | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture | Scoop.it

Consider disparities in treatment for pain. We’ve known for at least two decades that minorities, primarily blacks and Hispanics, receive inadequate pain medication. Often this failure comes when people need help the most.


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Hung The Nguyen's curator insight, July 16, 2013 8:23 PM

When teaching cross-cultural intercation I often mention 3 skills that student need to be mindful of and develop throughout their career.  You can't obtain competence in these skills and you don't get a certificate at the end of a course.  These skills need constant development.  There are tolerating ambiguity (cross-cultural interaction are ambiguous, vague and cultural values can be difficult to grasp); suspending judgment (It is natural for human to prejudge, to view the other as inferior usually in a moral sense. To be able to make suspend judgement until the situation is clearer is an important skill) and developing empathy (not being able to have empathy to the other will hinder clinical caring and holistic caring).

This articles calls for us to develop empathy and then  effect changes in our institutions, clinic and ourselves when we judge people about their pain and suffering.

Stories like this one is worth discussing in class because it goes against our sense of fairness and operate at a subconscious level (most of the time).  Bringing it into the open is a good strategy in teaching and learning.