Abby's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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TubeChop - Beatles Midsummer Night's Dream Spoof (in colour!)

TubeChop - Beatles Midsummer Night's Dream Spoof (in colour!) | Abby's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
TubeChop allows you to easily chop a funny or interesting section from any YouTube video and share it.
Abby Boisvert's insight:

This shows that Shakespeare was creating a comical element and that A Midsumer Night's Dream was meant to be comical. Also, this shows that this play is very famous because people all over the world know this play.

 

"Beatles Midsummer Night's Dream Spoof (in Colour!)." YouTube. YouTube, 05 July 2010. Web. 23 Feb. 2013.

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Nicholas Schmidt's comment, March 10, 2013 10:35 PM
I believe yours was the first presentation that we saw this video, and I just liked the idea of this video in general. I like how a group as popular as the Beatles would do something like this showing a little more into their personalities while incorporating a play as classic as A Midsummer Night's Dream.
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Image: Puck and Fairies, from "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

Image: Puck and Fairies, from "A Midsummer Night's Dream" | Abby's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
View and learn about by on The Google Art Project
Abby Boisvert's insight:

In this image you can see a group of fairies with Puck in the center. There is a large fairy in that back who is possibly Oberon but I don't know for sure. The fairies are playing intruments so the lady in the picture will be entertained. This lady could possibly be Hermia or Helena, but I think that it could be Titania. The fairies are trying to please whoever they are playing music to, so wouldn't they be trying to please their Queen most of all? Also, who is speculated to be Oberon is in the back gazing with what appears to be love in his eyes. If we are going off of that theme, the woman could also be Hippolyta. Near the beginning of the play, Titania and Oberon are upset because their lovers are marrying eachother. Hippolyta was Oberon's lover, so perhaps he had her meet her in the woods one last time before she got married?

 

N.p., n.d. Web.

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Kaley O'Connor's comment, March 10, 2013 2:02 PM
Even though several other people had this image, I think it made your presentation very interesting because you had a completely different interpretation. Now that you mentioned that the woman could be Hippolyta and the large fairy could be Oberon, I completely agree with you and it does look like they are gazing at each other as lovers. You also did a very good job supporting this idea and explaining it during your presentation. ~Kaley :)
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Historical Article: Shakespeare's Fairies: Exploring the Fairy Poetry of A Midsummer Night's Dream and Romeo and Juliet

Historical Article: Shakespeare's Fairies: Exploring the Fairy Poetry of A Midsummer Night's Dream and Romeo and Juliet | Abby's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
An essay from Folklore of Shakespeare, discussing Shakespeare's use of fairies and Elizabethan thoughts on the fairy world.
Abby Boisvert's insight:

This article talks about how Shakespeare had a very active imagination and seemed to be very knowledgeable in the fairy world. Fairies were very popular during Shakespeare's time. In A Midsummer Night's Dream, Shakespeare has his fairies live in a fairy world or realm with a king, queen, jester, and common fairies. Fairies are also tied into Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet with the fairy Queen Mab.

 

"Shakespeare's Fairies: Exploring the Fairy Poetry of A Midsummer Night's Dream and Romeo and Juliet." Shakespeare's Fairies: Exploring the Fairy Poetry of A Midsummer Night's Dream and Romeo and Juliet. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Feb. 2013.

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rkracine@cox.net's comment, March 7, 2013 8:46 PM
Are there any other plays that shakespeare incorporates fairies in?
Abby Boisvert's comment, March 8, 2013 3:02 PM
Yes, Romeo and Juliet. Some of his sonnets could also incorporate fairies.
rkracine@cox.net's comment, March 10, 2013 9:28 PM
Ok thanks abby. I do agree with many of your points on this topic. I believe that shakespeare uses many reoccurng themes, like faires, in his plays and as you meantioned, sonnets.
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Literary Criticism: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Literary Criticism: A Midsummer Night’s Dream | Abby's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Abby Boisvert's insight:

The author’s argument is that A Midsummer Night’s Dream is  a geniusly crafted play and that it is possibly “The greatest of his plays”. In the article he uses his own opinions about the play and his interpretations about it rather than textual evidence. Perhaps if he had supplied the criticism with textual evidence it would have been easier to interpret. The author also uses a clever comparison of Shakespeare’s works to other authors such as Bernard Shaw’s “As You Like It”. The author discusses how both of the titles are “Demanding a dark and ironic explanation”. That is unusual but also very logical insight on the title. The author is successful in proving his argument because he further goes into depth by then describing A Midsummer Night’s Dream. He goes on to sum up the play in one sentence. “It is the mysticism of happiness”. What the suthor could be meaning by this is that the idea behind the play is a happy nighttime frolick in the woods with your lover. It is a happy story, not throughout but overall it is happy. Also, it would make the audience happy because it is a comedy and has many comedic aspects.  The author truly knew his facts and was well informed on A Midsummer Night’s Dream. He brought up many interesting facts and different perspectives of looking at the play. In conclusion, the author was very knowledgeable on the subect and went into depth went analysing asnd critiquing it.

 

"ACS Blog." American Chesterton Society. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Feb. 2013.

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Source: Chicago Shakespeare Theater - A Midsummer Night's Dream - Shakespeare's Sources

Source: Chicago Shakespeare Theater - A Midsummer Night's Dream - Shakespeare's Sources | Abby's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Abby Boisvert's insight:

In this article it is shown that Shakespeare did not create all of his stories himself. He actually had many other people's stories that he just for lack of better words copy and pasted then so it would not be completely copyright, he created some of his own aspects also. The way that he wound together the stories with his own plot was ingenious though.

 

"Chicago Shakespeare Theater - A Midsummer Night's Dream - Shakespeare's Sources." Chicago Shakespeare Theater - A Midsummer Night's Dream - Shakespeare's Sources. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Feb. 2013.

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