Aardrijkskunde
64 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The end of bananas as we know them?

"A deadly fungus, known as Panama disease, is decimating banana plantations around the world and threatens to wipe out the most common species, the Cavendish banana. Scientists in Honduras are working to create a resistant banana before the disease hits Latin America, where the majority of the fruit is grown. NewsHour's Mori Rothman reports."


Via Seth Dixon
Pieter de Paauw's insight:

Nooit meer bananen in dozen, met plastic voor een versnelde rijping van de groene, onrijpe vrucht?

more...
Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, January 27, 3:58 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: How is this a geographic issue?  What are the spatial and regional implications?

Sharon McLean's curator insight, January 27, 6:04 PM

Interesting article for new NSW Geography Syllabus: Sustainable Biomes-technological factors that influence agricultural yields. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, January 28, 4:03 AM

Part of multiple eco threats...varoa mite decimating bees,climate warming and man made ones like fracking and war

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How geography shapes international politics

How geography shapes international politics | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Tim Marshall explains how world geography colors national development and foreign relations.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 3:37 PM

I haven't read the book yet, but am interested to see how Tim Marshall handles the topic to see it is a nuanced telling of how geographic impacts politics or if it strays into environmental determinism.  Based solely on the reviews it should be worth a read and my copy is on it's way. 

 

Tags: book reviews, historical, geopolitics.

Jacob Clauson's curator insight, February 4, 9:56 AM

Maps!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, February 4, 10:04 AM

want to read...unit 4

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mexican culture...Beyond Sombreros and Tequila

Promotional Video Campaign of "Viva Mexico"
http://vivamexico.aiesec.org.mx

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 4, 3:03 PM

I love Mexico and love celebrating Mexican culture...this video is a reminder to not solely focus on the past, but to see a vibrant modern Mexican culture as well. 

 

TagsMexico, folk cultures, culture, tourism.

Jose leon's curator insight, February 7, 2:25 AM

Watching this video really made me happy since I am Latino. When people think of Mexico they think of a poor country with corrupt politicians. It's funny because the country of Mexico isn't poor it's just the politicians keep it all to themselves. Many of there children take a private plane to Europe just to eat dinner and come back the very same day. This video shows that it is so much more than that. I had no idea that Mexico was number one automotive industry, and the country is extremely beautiful which is no real surprise to anybody. It has 9 out of the 11 ecosystems. Many of the avocadoes that people eat most likely came from Mexico since it’s number 1 exporter, along with tomatoes, mangoes, and guayabas. The Mexican people also have strong family values along with 1134 traditional festivals. 

Alex Smiga's curator insight, February 7, 7:40 PM

Watch the video guay

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind?

The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind? | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Genetically modified foods are often regarded as "unnatural" and approached with distrust. Commentator Tania Lombrozo considers the psychology behind these reactions.

 

Why do so many people oppose genetically modified organisms, or GMOs? According to a new paper forthcoming in the journal Trends in Plant Science, it's because opposition to GMOs taps into deep cognitive biases. These biases conspire to make arguments against GMOs intuitive and compelling, whether or not they're backed by strong evidence.

The authors of the paper — a mix of philosophers and biologists — turn to research in the cognitive sciences to shed light on the mismatch between the public's perception of GMOs (which is fairly negative, especially in Europe) and the state of the evidence about their safety (which is fairly positive).

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

10 Territorial Disputes That Mean Your Maps Are Already Wrong

10 Territorial Disputes That Mean Your Maps Are Already Wrong | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
As it stands, there are well over 150 territorial disputes around the globe, some more urgent than others. Here are 10 you need to know about -- and that could redefine the world map.

Via Seth Dixon
Pieter de Paauw's insight:

Onenigheid over territoria wereldwijd

more...
Padriag John-David Mahoney's curator insight, January 29, 2015 12:48 PM

I think this is particularly interesting because not only have these disputes have been going on for years but this attitude of "claiming what is mine" (even when it might not actually be yours) has been a part of government and human behavior since...forever. We never really change. First the attitude was to explore and conquer, but now it's guised as "claiming cultural heritage" or simply TAKING something (or someplace rather) by force and then just asserting either:it has always been ours" or, in the case of Vlad Putin, "It never actually had sovereignty in the first place...so I want it". It is Interesting to see how we guise colonialism in a supposedly post-colonialist world.

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Maps - Africa is getting more democratic

Maps - Africa is getting more democratic | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

#Africa is turning democratic. From my project: http://bit.ly/1DkpYjW pic.twitter.com/oWlsQfl5cM


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Drone footage - Landslide that destroyed highway in Montenegro


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 5:01 PM

Summary: This is a simple video showing aerial footage of a geographic landscape.  

 

Insight: This simple video really gave me an understanding of how easily geographic information can be gathered today and made me think about the different ways which geographic information can be gathered.

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Why we need to keep fossil fuels in the ground - video

Why we need to keep fossil fuels in the ground - video | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

We need to reduce emissions to keep our planet safe for future generations - the science is clear. Guardian journalists explain the 'keep it in the ground' theory in easy to understand terms.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
Bella Reagan's curator insight, March 24, 2015 1:55 AM

Unit 3-

summary 

this video is about the theory of "keep it in the ground" which refers to keeping fossil fuels and oils in the ground. They want to spread this idea because once it isa taken out of the ground it is primarily used to burn, which is detrimental to the environment. One important number is that two degrees is the safest climate change number, and global warming has shown this. Another is 565 gigatons of carbon dioxide which is the safe amount in the atmosphere. 2795 ids the amount of carbon dioxide that would be released if all the fossil fuels in reserves was burned. 

Insight

I found this as a very interesting video and a very frightening video. Basically this argument believes that fossil fuels are doing us more harm than good. Over time they believe that fossil fuel burning will destroy our environment and atmosphere through global warming and atmospheric pollution. We need to watch and make sure we are conservative with fossil fuels and not burning too much at once. 

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from aardrijkskunde
Scoop.it!

Containerisatie vormde Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

 


Via Seth Dixon, Edelin Espino, wereldvak
Pieter de Paauw's insight:

Mooi verhaal over het belang van (zee)containers

more...
Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 27, 2015 3:45 AM

I believe this video is very interesting. It tells us that everything we have today is thanks to globalization and the reason we have it so fast is because of shipping containers! In the video it told me that before my time it was impossible to get swordfish from Japan or cheeses from France, but now thanks to globalization it is all possible. Globalization is even behind the reason how our phones were made! 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:28 AM

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today.  This is a very useful video.  

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from aardrijkskunde
Scoop.it!

MeteoEarth - website en apps voor het weer in de klas

MeteoEarth - website en apps voor het weer in de klas | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
MeteoEarth is a fantastic website and set of apps that let you view global weather patterns as they occur in real time on your IWB or iPad. ("MeteoEarth – A Global Weather Viewer in the Classroom" looks like useful fun!

Via wereldvak
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from aardrijkskunde
Scoop.it!

22 Internationale grenzen

22 Internationale grenzen | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Brazilië (boven) en Bolivia (beneden)."


Via Seth Dixon, wereldvak
more...
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 6, 2014 7:49 PM

Borders can tell us a great feel about the relationship beween the two  nations.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 2014 12:52 PM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:11 AM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from aardrijkskunde
Scoop.it!

Geography in the News: Polder Salvation - National Geographic

Geography in the News: Polder Salvation - National Geographic | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Geography in the News: Polder Salvation
National Geographic
The effects of global warming and accompanying sea level rise are threatening many of the world's lowland areas.

Via wereldvak
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Meandering Stream Time Lapse


Via Seth Dixon, Mathijs Booden
Pieter de Paauw's insight:

Een natuurlijk meanderende rivier

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:06 PM

This is a fantastic way to visualize physical geographic processes. 


Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 1:24 PM

El Sire Reserve in Peru is a river that has been monitored over the last 28 years. Every time I watch this short 6 second clip, I learn something different about how this river has changed. On the bottom of the screen, just past half way, the river just takes a huge short cut and cuts over and connects to a different part of the same river. This happens on the whole river too. there are 8 or 9 huge bends and curves in the river but by the end in 2012 there are only about 3 to 4 bends and curves. For some reason the water is taking short cuts and just leaving the spaces where the water used to run through and leaving it dry.  

Mathijs Booden's curator insight, January 20, 8:35 AM

This is such a tangible way of showing things that seem abstract on a static map.

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt

Revisiting Alexander von Humboldt | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
On why a Prussian scientific visionary should be studied afresh…In a superb biography, Andrea Wulf makes an inspired case for Alexander von Humboldt to be considered the greatest scientist of the 19th century. Certainly he was the last great polymath in a scientific world which, by the time he died in Berlin in 1859, aged 89, was fast hardening into the narrow specializations that typify science to this day. Yet in the English-speaking world, Humboldt is strangely little-known.

Via Seth Dixon
Pieter de Paauw's insight:

De nieuwe methode van de onderbouw: (Alexander von) Humboldt

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 10, 2015 8:28 AM

Alexander von Humboldt has been described as the last great ancient geographer concerned with understanding an eclectic cosmography as well as the first modern geographer. He is honored far and wide throughout Europe and especially  Latin America for his explorations, but given that people are confused as how to categorize him and classify his contributions, today he is under-appreciated.  Geographers need to reclaim his memory and call his extensive, globetrotting work on a wide range of subjects ‘geography.’  Here is another article and TED-ED video on the most influential scientist that you might not have heard of (at least until today).

 

Tags:  historicalbiogeography.

Tony Burton's curator insight, January 29, 11:32 AM

An interesting biography, but, strangely, Ms Wulf almost completely ignores Humboldt's time in Mexico. In some ways, his time in Mexico was more pivotal in terms of geography than his time in South America. Claiming that Humboldt is a virtual unknown in Europe is a gross distortion of the facts; there have been numerous books about Humboldt over the last thirty to forty years, let alone before that time!.

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why don't black and white Americans live together?

Why don't black and white Americans live together? | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
In many parts of the US, Americans of different races aren't neighbours - they don't go to the same schools, they don't always have access to the same services.

Via Seth Dixon
Pieter de Paauw's insight:

Segregatie in beeld

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 9:11 PM

This article is filled with good geography (and more specifically AP Human Geography) vocabulary.  Redlining, blockbusting, and racial covenants are all discussed as spatial process that have shaped socioeconomic and racial characteristics in American cities. 

 

Tags: neighborhood, urban, socioeconomic, racepoverty, spatialhousing.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, February 2, 9:30 AM

We have the same separation in DC. East of the River...

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, February 4, 10:01 AM

unit 7

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Glaciology in Greenland

Glaciology in Greenland | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Sharyn Alfonsi goes to the top of the world to report on scientists trying to get to the bottom of climate change and sea level rise by studying one of the largest glaciers in the Arctic Circle."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 6, 2:59 PM

The 13 minute video clip from the show "60 Minutes" is a good introduction to the importance and difficulty of studying glacial melt, climate change, and the impacts of a receding ice sheet.  

 

Tags: physical, erosion, climate change, Greenland.

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Regional Geography
Scoop.it!

The Unfinished Suburbs of America

The Unfinished Suburbs of America | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Thousands of acres across the country were partially developed during the housing boom. What should happen to them now?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Geoffrey West: The surprising math of cities and corporations - YouTube

http://www.ted.com Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities -- that wealth, crime rate, walking speed...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Built 4 Betterness Ed van den Berg's curator insight, December 14, 2014 3:17 PM

Not surprisingly the DNA of cities is a follow-up of human DNA and understanding this will explain and predict how the body of a city will develop!

SRA's curator insight, April 16, 2015 2:10 AM

The idea that cities are just organisms that are satisfying the laws of biology is interesting. Especially because Physicist Geoffrey West brings the idea of Scalability which by definition is, the ability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work in a capable manner or its ability to be enlarged to accommodate that growth. What’s mind blowing to me is that the system that is referred to here is human interaction.  We create these cities through our interaction and experience. With a growth rate of 1,000,000 people every year the math adds up to an agreeable 15% rise in income levels, patents, and super creative people every year which is undoubted a win for civilization and society. But with that we must keep in mind also this means a 15% increase in things like deadly disease, crime, poverty, and ecological issues leading to further degradation of our planet. This unbounded growth means the system is destined to collapse. The math behind cities doesn't lie if we don’t prepare cities have a fate to die like every other organism in Biology. So it is up to us to create and innovate to sustain this growth and avoid the collapse. But we must do so at a forever increasing pace. Which subsequently is also part of another system predetermined to collapse. What I mean is what happens when we cannot innovate fast enough to sustain this growth?


- Caleb Beckett

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:14 AM

While corporations rise and fall, it is quite rare for a city to entirely fail as an economic system.  Huge cities have some negative consequences, but the networks that operate in the city function more efficiently on economies of scale in a way that offsets the negatives.  Increasing a city's population will continue to improve the economies of scale (larger cities have higher wages per capita, more creative employment per capita, etc.).  However, this growth requires major technological innovations to sustain long-term growth.  

 

Tags: urban, planning, megacities, industry, economic, scale, TED, video.

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Graphs - Urbanization across the continents

Graphs - Urbanization across the continents | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

% urban now Nth Am 82% Lat Am 80% Europe 73% Oceania 71% World 54% Asia 48% Africa 40% http://esa.un.org/unpd/wup/Highlights/WUP2014-Highlights.pdf … pic.twitter.com/UdnEZGlkRZ


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Photography - The Pacific islands losing a way of life to climate change

Photography - The Pacific islands losing a way of life to climate change | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

Over 150,000 people living on the low-lying atolls of Kiribati and the Marshall Islands are threatened by rising sea levels and as flooding becomes more common, relocation is the only option left.


Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from Classroom geography
Scoop.it!

Video - Dumb cities make people sick

Over the last century, cities have been designed to accommodate the automobile. So, how do we redesign them to benefit people?

Via Mathijs Booden
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from aardrijkskunde
Scoop.it!

Wereld: cultuur verspreiding vanaf 600v Chr, in 5 min

"This animation distils hundreds of years of culture into just five minutes. A team of historians and scientists wanted to map cultural mobility, so they tracked the births and deaths of notable individuals like David, King of Israel, and Leonardo da Vinci, from 600 BC to the present day. Using them as a proxy for skills and ideas, their map reveals intellectual hotspots and tracks how empires rise and crumble. The information comes from Freebase, a Google-owned database of well-known people and places, and other catalogues of notable individuals. The team is based at the University of Texas at Dallas."


Via Seth Dixon, wereldvak
more...
wereldvak's curator insight, August 13, 2014 10:00 AM

Geografische concepten als stedelijke ontwikkeling en diffusie patronen worden zichtbaar. Primate city en rank-size rule.....en demografische veranderingen in gebeiden.

Stran smith's curator insight, August 27, 2014 9:25 PM

Hi it's one of your students try to guess who it is��

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:27 AM

CULTURAL UNIT

This amazing youtube video is something we watched in class, and is such a great animation. This video charts hundreds of years of cultural diffusion in a mere five minutes. You can see empires rise and crumple, people die and become born, as well as many other significant dates. This applies to the diffusion patterns of culture, because we can see where people and cultures are going throughout the centuries. 

Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from aardrijkskunde
Scoop.it!

Outsourcing textielproductie: maar waar komt het vandaan? Interactive kaart.

Outsourcing textielproductie: maar waar komt het vandaan? Interactive kaart. | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
This dynamic map shows where major garment companies outsource manufacturing.

Via wereldvak
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Pieter de Paauw from aardrijkskunde
Scoop.it!

Territoriale aanspraken in de wateren rond China: een overzicht

Territoriale aanspraken in de wateren rond  China: een overzicht | Aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
China has recently increased its pursuit of territorial claims in nearby seas, leading to tense exchanges with neighboring countries. A map of some of the most notable disputes.

Via Seth Dixon, wereldvak
more...
Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 1:07 PM

Another key article regarding the ongoing disputes of the South China Sea - this article, when paired with our later discussion of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, will help us understand why this issue will be increasing in importance in the coming year.

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 2014 7:33 PM

(East Asia topic 4)

Though international politics are nothing to be taken lightly, this scenario resembles that of children drawing on a chalkboard and fighting for the space on their sides (or maybe it's just me since this happened a lot in my elementary school...). I admit that there seems to be no one right way of solving these disputes, but perhaps a god starting point would be a historical stance: Who found an island first? Which nation first used it? How historically significant is a place to each country?  Those islands which lie outside the EEZs or which there is no clear primary holder could be made into a jointly-managed zone, in which each country with a legitimate claim shares equal profits and usage of the resources. Though nations will argue that they don't want such a settlement, it may end up being beneficial, since one particular place may turn out being much more profitable than another one nearby. So even if China were to inherit 90% of these islands and territory, theoretically a large amount of oil or gems could be discovered in the other 10%, making aggression a bad move over a sharing compromise.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 4:38 PM

Why do we care so much about smaller islands? Some of these islands are very useful when it comes to gaining access to minerals and deep sea drilling off its shores. Someof these countries can also claim the land and have their own government and be run themselves. These islands have a special economic zone of 200 miles.