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AAEEBL -- MOOCs, Badges & ePortfolios
MOOCs, Badges & ePortfolios -- Great Mix for 21st Century Learning
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MOOC Manifesto | Conecta 13

MOOC Manifesto | Conecta 13 | AAEEBL -- MOOCs, Badges & ePortfolios | Scoop.it

MOOCs are one of the hot topics in e-learning and Higher Education at the moment. The number of institutions designing their own MOOCs is growing exponentially and, thus, collective, academic reflection upon this new meme is required to guarantee we understand each other and we agree on some key issues concerning MOOCs


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, April 2, 2013 11:13 AM

What follows - the manifest - is a list of 23 items which can best be seen as individual statements about what MOOCs are (or not) and what you can do with them (or cannot). It is not an (extensive) attempt to define MOOCs or a call for action on what we should do with MOOCs. Keeping that in mind, the list is useful as a summary of the many items that are raised in discussions on MOOCs (orginal in Spanish) (@pbsloep)

Cathleen Nardi's curator insight, April 5, 2013 7:37 PM

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The Four Student Archetypes Emerging in MOOCs | Phil Hill - e-Literate

The Four Student Archetypes Emerging in MOOCs | Phil Hill - e-Literate | AAEEBL -- MOOCs, Badges & ePortfolios | Scoop.it

 […] the focus on “completion rates” in MOOCs is somewhat misplaced, as open education is not simply an extension of traditional education. As several others have noted, not every student is attempting to complete a course, and in fact different students have different goals while participating in the same open course. This holds true for both cMOOCs and xMOOCs. … The challenge, therefore, is to move beyond the simplistic view of one type of student with one type of goal (course completion), and find patterns of student behavior that will give additional insight into the different goals and therefore different measures we should have in evaluating whether MOOCs are effective.


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 8, 2013 10:23 AM

Phil Hill discerns four types of MOOC students, with self-explanatory labels. There are the lurkers, the passive participant, the active participants, and the drop-ins. The final group only becomes active for a particular topic within the course. Completion rates, he continues, make only sense for active students, not for the other three categories. Then, completion rates are in the vicinity of 40% rather than 10%, it seems. 

At face value, this is a sensible argument. Obviously, a course's completion rate is a measure of its success. But given that there are at least three other kinds of groups who take the trouble to register for a MOOC, one wonders whether they were satisfied with it? Indeed, we should wonder whether it is appropriate and sensible to ask these people whether they got out of the course what they wanted. With this massiveness, we should simply acknowledge that different people pursue different goals. Arguably, a course's success should therefore be measured by the extent to which all groups managed to achieve their several goals. So, although I agree it makes sense to differentiate between groups, it makes less sense to measure a MOOC's success by focusing on one group  only. (@pbsloep)

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MOOCs are a fundamental misperception of how teaching works | Mark Guzdial

"During break (e.g., multi-hour long car rides), I gave a lot of thought to MOOCs and the changes that are coming to higher education. I realized that people can only believe that MOOCs can replace existing higher education classes if they misunderstand what a teacher does."


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, January 9, 2013 10:38 AM

Mark Guzdial's angle on MOOCs may easily be dismissed as that of  a teacher wanting to save his job, but that would be unjust. Teachers, he says, do not so much lecture, but orchestratee learning activities; they are not so much teaching experts as content experts; they do not so much filter (information) but motivate. So "replacing good teachers with MOOCs reflects a deep understanding of what a teacher does". Here's the problem: "MOOCs do what the external world _thinks_ that University teachers do".

Should we perhaps convince the 'external world' to stop seeing teaching as a form of knowledge broadcasting and help them understand that teaching essentially is creating the right conditions for people to learn. If that can be done without teachers, with MOOCs or otherwise, so much the better as teachers 'do not 'scale', but the onus then is on the 'external world' to convincingly show it can. (@pbsloep)

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MOOC Badging and the Learning Arc

MOOC Badging and the Learning Arc | AAEEBL -- MOOCs, Badges & ePortfolios | Scoop.it

In a recent blog post Rebecca Galley introduced the OLDS-MOOC Badging Strategy and the nine badges that will be associated with the MOOC. The first part of the post expands on some of our thinking behind the strategy by using a pictorial representation to explain the place of the badges in the course. This is predicated on (a) the idea that a course, just like a novel, a movie or a video game, contains a broad central 'story arc' - a 'learning arc' or journey with a start (beginning of course) and an end, and (b) the idea that there are different types of badge that have different relationships with this learning arc. The second part reflects some of our initial critical consideration of what the roles and benefits of badges may be. As the post is intended as a discussion piece, we welcome your thoughts and responses.


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The rhetoric which surrounds MOOCs can distract us from the broader project of ‘unbundling’ the University in pursuit of profit

The rhetoric which surrounds MOOCs can distract us from the broader project of ‘unbundling’ the University in pursuit of profit | AAEEBL -- MOOCs, Badges & ePortfolios | Scoop.it

Internet delivered higher education is described by some in revolutionary terms, providing access to education for poor people or remote populations. In practice, though, the ‘unbundling’ of activities is advocated in order better to subject them to marketisation. John Holmwood argues that consultants advocating for the ‘unbundling’ of universities care not about widening inequality or providing students with employment opportunities, but rather with exploiting the potentially profitable ventures that may arise in the future.

 


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 24, 2013 4:30 AM

The article is in particular directed at an advice for 'unbundling the university' written by three Pearson consultants. A while ago, I addressed the similar issue of the monetisation of education in a blog of mine (http://pbsloep.blogspot.nl/2013/01/moocs-what-about-them-continued.html), referring to ideas by political philosopher Michael Sandel. John Holmwood's analysis reveals the nexus of interests that are served by privatising education. One could accuse Homes of an ad hominem, not addressing the issue but discrediting the messenger. Although he does discuss the authors' credentials and affiliations, such an accusation would not be fair as he also puts forth material arguments. But even more importantly, and for this you need to read the Pearson article itself, the argument pro unbundling advanced by the Pearson people are more like an advertorial than a serious scientific position paper. In such a case, it becomes interesting to find out where these arguments come from, that is, in virtue of whose interests, they are provided. The message that then comes to the fore is disconcerting at least. Or, as John Holmes puts it: "Thus is public higher education reduced to dining off the crumbs from high table! We might curtsy and doff our caps, but best, perhaps, just to bundle these charlatans off the scene and claim back higher education for democracy and public life." (@pbsloep)

Carlos Marcelo's curator insight, March 24, 2013 5:21 AM

Pros y contras de los MOOCs

verstelle's curator insight, March 26, 2013 4:13 PM

Author puts to the sword the recent report (‘report’ as he calls it) An Avalanche is Coming, written by Sir Michael Barber, Katelyn Donnelly and Saad Rizvi all part of Pearson Education.

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Learn Like an Arachnid: Why I’m MOOCifying | Hybrid Pedagogy | Janine DeBaise

Learn Like an Arachnid: Why I’m MOOCifying | Hybrid Pedagogy | Janine DeBaise | AAEEBL -- MOOCs, Badges & ePortfolios | Scoop.it

"When [my students] do group projects in the research/composition course I teach, I’m impressed with their topics, the depth of their knowledge, and their passion. 

What seems wrong is that their presentations are only to each other. Sure, they invite their friends, but at a small college where everyone takes a whole bunch of the same courses, that’s not a very satisfying audience. The students teach me and have changed me -- dramatically -- but I shouldn’t be the only person to benefit from their knowledge and fresh ideas.

 

...

 

I want to help weave them -- and their circles of connection -- into a sparkling web that stretches around the globe. I want them to figure out how to do this not just for one semester, but for the rest of their lives."


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:11 PM

Janine DeBaise got her epiphany, as she calls it, on how to go about this when she participated in MOOC MOOC, a MOOC about MOOCs. And she started to structure her course in Environmental Science and Foresty along the lines of what she'd learnt in that course on MOOC pedagogy. 

 

I like her story, because it points out so well what I have often argued for, that if we take lifelong learning seriously, college should prepare students for life as a professional. I mean really prepare them, by initiating them already in a professional network and by exposing them to the tools needed to participate in such a network effectively.

 

Janine's story is well worth reading for this reason alone. Apart from that, it is a nice personal account, with which many teachers will be able to identify, I am sure. (@pbsloep). 

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Digital Badges: A More Viable Currency for Returning Adult Students? | Kyle Peck

Digital Badges: A More Viable Currency for Returning Adult Students? | Kyle Peck | AAEEBL -- MOOCs, Badges & ePortfolios | Scoop.it

Higher education is based largely on the assumption that students want degrees, and therefore they want the courses that are required to earn those degrees. And that assumption has been valid. Degrees have been a “ticket” that offered the possibility of admission to a desirable career (if it wasn’t sold out).

 

But as more and more people sought and received degrees, the increasing number of tickets available decreased the probability that the ticket would guarantee admission. And, as more and more institutions were printing tickets based on their own criteria, it became more and more difficult for the gatekeepers to know which ticketholders should be admitted. Many of the applicants already possess what appears to be a valid ticket, and the tickets carry very little information: Name of institution/Name of degree. That’s it.

 

In the next few years, I predict we’ll see more and more adult students interested in accumulating digital badges, as opposed to wanting course credits or degrees. Digital badges are more modular, they do a much better job of describing what the badge holder can do, and they can be assembled in ways that highlight how an individual stands out from the crowd. They can illustrate how he or she has the core qualifications required for consideration, and also has a series of related skills, perspectives, and attributes that add up to competitive advantage. And the quality of each badge can be interrogated with a single click of the mouse.


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