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Rescooped by alaa ahmed from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Image reuse guidelines - teachable moment?

Image reuse guidelines - teachable moment? | aaaaaaaaaaaaaa | Scoop.it

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You may have caught this discussion, about a popular facebook page's inappropriate reuse of images (http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/compound-eye/2013/04/23/facebooks-i-fcking-love-science-does-not-fcking-love-artists/).

 

Here's a good rule, which I learned from a copyright lawyer, "The golden rule: Just because it’s on the internet doesn’t give your permission to reuse it."

 

With that in mind, are you doing enough to teach your students about the appropriate appropriation of images? Of course, you teach them how to find and cite articles, but what messages do you give them about crediting image souces? 

 

Talk to your students about the importance of crediting the work of others. Written class work or talks that are shared only in the classroom should cite all image sources. Work that is to be published, whether in a journal or online, needs a more formal approach, which often includes getting permission from the copyright holder.

 

Here are a couple of tips about sourcing images for publication that I shared at a science communication workshop.

 

Image databases

If you want to reuse an image from an image database, be sure to adhere to their requests – some want you to write for permission, others do not. I always include a credit and a link to the source – it’s polite, and gives credit where credit is due.

A few that are good sources of (usually) free images, with attribution:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - http://phil.cdc.gov/Phil/home.asp

Forestry Images – http://www.forestryimages.org/log.cfm

The Higher Education Academy Center for Bioscience ImageBank (Animals, plants and other) http://www.bioscience.heacademy.ac.uk/imagebank/

Clip art - http://openclipart.org/

Searchable free photos - http://www.bigfoto.com/

Images in the Teaching Tools in Plant Biology slides cite back to their original sources, and can be a good place for students to find sourced images http://www.plantcell.org/site/teachingtools/teaching.xhtml

 

Wikipedia

The images illustrating Wikipedia articles are almost always available through a Creative Commons license. Wikipedia also maintains a list of public domain image resources here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Public_domain_image_resources

 

Learn about the Creative Commons license here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creative_Commons_license

 

Scientific journals

Images from scientific journals are copyright protected. You can often use them for educational purposes without paying a fee, but you must obtain permission first. Look for the Rights and Permissions link, usually on the abstract page of an article, but sometimes on the general journal information pages. Many journals use the Copyright Clearance Center service to manage their permissions - you have to register. Some journals cover all their content by a Creative Commons license and do not require a copyright clearance center request (but do require attribution). Notably, JBC and the PLOS and BMC journals are covered by creative commons licenses.

 

I wasn't taught about the electronic sharing of images when I was a student, because we didn't have the internet (as we know it) when I was a student, but our students live in in a more complex world - don't send them out unprepared!


Via Mary Williams
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Abigail Rumsey's comment, April 25, 2013 4:09 AM
You can also use an option on the advanced search of www.flickr.com to just search Creative Commons licensed images.
Mary Williams's comment, April 27, 2013 10:14 AM
Going beyond images, here is an intersting guide on how to credit moving images and sound! I didn't know that... http://lefthandedbiochemist.wordpress.com/2013/03/27/guide-for-citing-audiovisual-materials/
Rescooped by alaa ahmed from Hotel and accommodation trends
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Two-thirds of European hotels now offering free wifi to guests

Two-thirds of European hotels now offering free wifi to guests | aaaaaaaaaaaaaa | Scoop.it
A good sign for those campaigning (or voting with their feet) for free wifi in hotels in recent years, with news that 67% of hotels in Europe are giving wifi as a complimentary service.

Via Roland Schegg
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Rescooped by alaa ahmed from Trade unions and social activism
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Unite To Ballot For Strike Action At Menzies World Cargo

Unite To Ballot For Strike Action At Menzies World Cargo | aaaaaaaaaaaaaa | Scoop.it
Britain's biggest union plans to ballot its members for strike action over a two-year pay freeze imposed by Menzies on its staff at Heathrow.

Via Leicester Worker
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Rescooped by alaa ahmed from Into the Driver's Seat
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How the Arts Unlock the Door to Learning | Edutopia

How the Arts Unlock the Door to Learning | Edutopia | aaaaaaaaaaaaaa | Scoop.it

By Mariko Nobori

 

"What do Mars and modern dance have to do with each other? How do you connect fractions with Andy Warhol? At Wiley H. Bates Middle School, in Annapolis, Maryland, the answer is arts integration. Every teacher there is committed to weaving the arts and standard curricula together to create a richer and more lasting learning experience for their students.

 

"Arts integration goes beyond including art projects in class; it is a teaching strategy that seamlessly merges arts standards with core curricula to build connections and provide engaging context. For example, in a science classroom you might see students choreographing a dance using locomotor and nonlocomotor movements to demonstrate their understanding of rotation versus revolution of the planets (PDF). In a math class, you might see students learning fractions by examining composition in Warhol's Campbell's soup paintings.

 

"(See more arts-integrated lesson plans from Bates.)"


Via Jim Lerman
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 24, 2013 7:29 PM

This is a thoughtful article.

Rescooped by alaa ahmed from The Content Marketing Hat
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Creative Prompting for Easier Writing

Creative Prompting for Easier Writing | aaaaaaaaaaaaaa | Scoop.it
Writing is not an easy task, but this is how you can do your own motivational steps to bring your muse to the fore – a process in writing loosely called “prompting.”

Via Mike Allton
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Mike Allton's curator insight, April 24, 2013 9:52 AM

There's a technique in writing called "prompting" which is to specifically go someplace or do something designed to get your creative juices flowing.

 

Maricel Rivera outlines several ways that authors and bloggers who write fiction or creative works can get motivated, but what if you're writing for business or a more professional and technical format? What places can you go or things can you do to get motivated and inspired to write for your business?

Rescooped by alaa ahmed from Hotel and accommodation trends
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Le secteur hôtelier genevois pèse 1 milliard

Le secteur hôtelier genevois pèse 1 milliard | aaaaaaaaaaaaaa | Scoop.it

La Société des Hôteliers de Genève (SHG) présentait jeudi matin son étude sur l'impact économique du secteur hôtelier genevois en 2012. Une enquête cofinancée par le Groupement d'Hôtels 5 étoiles.

Parmi les chiffres à retenir:
• L'hôtellerie genevoise a réalisé plus d'1 milliard de chiffre d'affaires 
• Genève représente 1/10ème des recettes hôtelières suisses
• 50% du chiffre d’affaires est généré par les hôtels 5 étoiles
• Durant leur séjour, les clients des hôtels genevois dépensent 
450 millions de francs supplémentaires dans le reste de l’économie locale
• Le secteur représente quelque 4'000 emplois directs


Via Roland Schegg
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Roland Schegg's curator insight, April 19, 2013 12:56 AM

étude conduite par l'Institut de Tourisme de la HES-SO Valais (www.hevs.ch) en 2012

Rescooped by alaa ahmed from Contests and Games Revolution
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Key To Successful Startup? Contests, Games, Gamification

Key To Successful Startup? Contests, Games, Gamification | aaaaaaaaaaaaaa | Scoop.it
When it comes to new app startups, social media marketing is invaluable because it maximizes exposure for a minimal cost.

Via Sergey Ruseev, Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, April 10, 2013 12:46 AM

Startups Use Contests & Games To Create PR
Great post about how startup app creators are using cool tools to set up games and contests to create cheap PR for their new products and services. 

Are games and gamification the new PR? Maybe.  

Rescooped by alaa ahmed from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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Directions At Their Fingertips

Directions At Their Fingertips | aaaaaaaaaaaaaa | Scoop.it
Read the directions and directly you will be directed in the right direction. -Lewis Carroll I know there are a million jokes about a certain gender  *ahem* not wanting to stop and ask directions. ...

Via John Evans
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Kasey Rasmussen's curator insight, April 26, 2013 9:26 AM

I am going to do this for my two boys, 7 and 10 yrs, for my sanity and theirs for their morning routine!  It's a win win... they get to use their iTouch in the morning and I won't be pulling my hair out tell them the same things I tell them every morning! :)

Rescooped by alaa ahmed from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Image reuse guidelines - teachable moment?

Image reuse guidelines - teachable moment? | aaaaaaaaaaaaaa | Scoop.it

-

You may have caught this discussion, about a popular facebook page's inappropriate reuse of images (http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/compound-eye/2013/04/23/facebooks-i-fcking-love-science-does-not-fcking-love-artists/).

 

Here's a good rule, which I learned from a copyright lawyer, "The golden rule: Just because it’s on the internet doesn’t give your permission to reuse it."

 

With that in mind, are you doing enough to teach your students about the appropriate appropriation of images? Of course, you teach them how to find and cite articles, but what messages do you give them about crediting image souces? 

 

Talk to your students about the importance of crediting the work of others. Written class work or talks that are shared only in the classroom should cite all image sources. Work that is to be published, whether in a journal or online, needs a more formal approach, which often includes getting permission from the copyright holder.

 

Here are a couple of tips about sourcing images for publication that I shared at a science communication workshop.

 

Image databases

If you want to reuse an image from an image database, be sure to adhere to their requests – some want you to write for permission, others do not. I always include a credit and a link to the source – it’s polite, and gives credit where credit is due.

A few that are good sources of (usually) free images, with attribution:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - http://phil.cdc.gov/Phil/home.asp

Forestry Images – http://www.forestryimages.org/log.cfm

The Higher Education Academy Center for Bioscience ImageBank (Animals, plants and other) http://www.bioscience.heacademy.ac.uk/imagebank/

Clip art - http://openclipart.org/

Searchable free photos - http://www.bigfoto.com/

Images in the Teaching Tools in Plant Biology slides cite back to their original sources, and can be a good place for students to find sourced images http://www.plantcell.org/site/teachingtools/teaching.xhtml

 

Wikipedia

The images illustrating Wikipedia articles are almost always available through a Creative Commons license. Wikipedia also maintains a list of public domain image resources here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Public_domain_image_resources

 

Learn about the Creative Commons license here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creative_Commons_license

 

Scientific journals

Images from scientific journals are copyright protected. You can often use them for educational purposes without paying a fee, but you must obtain permission first. Look for the Rights and Permissions link, usually on the abstract page of an article, but sometimes on the general journal information pages. Many journals use the Copyright Clearance Center service to manage their permissions - you have to register. Some journals cover all their content by a Creative Commons license and do not require a copyright clearance center request (but do require attribution). Notably, JBC and the PLOS and BMC journals are covered by creative commons licenses.

 

I wasn't taught about the electronic sharing of images when I was a student, because we didn't have the internet (as we know it) when I was a student, but our students live in in a more complex world - don't send them out unprepared!


Via Mary Williams
more...
Abigail Rumsey's comment, April 25, 2013 4:09 AM
You can also use an option on the advanced search of www.flickr.com to just search Creative Commons licensed images.
Mary Williams's comment, April 27, 2013 10:14 AM
Going beyond images, here is an intersting guide on how to credit moving images and sound! I didn't know that... http://lefthandedbiochemist.wordpress.com/2013/03/27/guide-for-citing-audiovisual-materials/
Rescooped by alaa ahmed from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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Screenbird: Desktop Video Capture

Screenbird:  Desktop Video Capture | aaaaaaaaaaaaaa | Scoop.it
Screenbird. Free Simple, Sharable Screen Recording. No Downloading Executables. Works through Java in your browser.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 24, 2013 1:37 PM

I like the features of this screen capture system. Up to 30 minutes per video, easy expeort to YouTube.  Worht a try for your next tutorial.