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AMC Exec: 'Breaking Bad,' 'Mad Men' Prove Multiplatform Deals Boost Ratings

AMC Exec: 'Breaking Bad,' 'Mad Men' Prove Multiplatform Deals Boost Ratings | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
AMC isn’t looking for quick hits with its original series after execs at the network watched shows like “Breaking Bad” and “Mad Men” slowly blossom in the ratings. “Good shows have a much greater c...
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Here's How Music, Brands and Tech Collided in 2014

Here's How Music, Brands and Tech Collided in 2014 | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
The worlds of pop music, social media, digital platforms, tech gadgetry and creativity collided like never before in 2014, so Revolt TV recently invited a group of expert journalists to weigh in on how it all went down.

Via Benjamin DEBUSSCHERE
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Her review | Little White Lies

Her review | Little White Lies | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Whimsical futuro-romance effortlessly evolves into ambiguous, unfathomable hard sci-fi in Spike Jonze's best film to date.

That title… So simple, so romantic, so gently wistful. Without knowing anything about the film it sits atop, that single, unadorned word conjures images of a man, a romantic man, a sensitive soul longing for a woman. And the woman is everything to him, a Venus figure, his ideal. His focus is trained on Her. Is she his singular, all consuming obsession? Possibly. Probably! But he is removed from this woman. She is generic, not specific. There’s no name. He dreams about her, worships her from afar. He has her, but can’t hold her.
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Why The Women Of 'Peaky Blinders' Are The Real Badasses Of The Show

Why The Women Of 'Peaky Blinders' Are The Real Badasses Of The Show | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
If you’re just now hearing about the show, let’s set the scene. The series, which is set in post WWI England, follows Tommy Shelby (played by Cillian Murphy) and the rest of the ruthless and feared Peaky Blinders gang—we know, goofy name—the inner circle of which is made up of his family members. The Shelbys and the Blinders control the racetracks in Northern England, making them one of the wealthiest families around in a poverty-stricken, post-war country. Creator Steven Knight based his series on the real Peaky Blinders gang, known for their gambling and violence, and put his own dreamy twist on it. Between the contemporary soundtrack, undercut hairdos, and stylized slow-mo, each episode feels as if you’re being told the darkest, most badass history lesson ever.
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11 Ways Mad Men Changed Our World - Esquire

11 Ways Mad Men Changed Our World - Esquire | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
As the new series gets underway, we look at how Don Draper and co helped reshape contemporary culture
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What Do People Like About 'Mad Men'? - TV Eskimo

What Do People Like About 'Mad Men'? - TV Eskimo | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Few modern television programs have inspired a following as devoted as that of “Mad Men,” AMC’s soapy serial about a philandering ad executive and the way society changes around him. So, what do people like about “Mad Men” so much?
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In Pop, We Can Transcend Our Bodies. In the Real World, We're Still Stuck in ... - Slate Magazine

In Pop, We Can Transcend Our Bodies. In the Real World, We're Still Stuck in ... - Slate Magazine | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Hi, Carl, Ann, and Lindsay, It’s a pleasure to return to the Music Club! One of the reasons we participate in these end-of-the-year critical wrap-ups is to reflect on the way pop music helps us mark the passage of time.
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Jennifer Lawrence: Legal “Tipping Point” for Women in Hollywood?

Jennifer Lawrence: Legal “Tipping Point” for Women in Hollywood? | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
The recent “Guardians of Peace” Sony hacks are rocking Hollywood this holiday season with revelations of studio-wide sexism.
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Gaga's Law: How Art Conquered Pop and Why Jay Z Goes to Art Basel - Vulture

Gaga's Law: How Art Conquered Pop and Why Jay Z Goes to Art Basel - Vulture | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Jerry Saltz and Matthew Weinstein discuss.
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‘Sons of Anarchy’: Female Violence, Feminist Care

‘Sons of Anarchy’: Female Violence, Feminist Care | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Mothers of Anarchy
This post by Leigh Kolb originally appeared at And Philosophy and is cross-posted with permission.
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Why Her Is the Best Film of the Year

Why Her Is the Best Film of the Year | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Thoughtful, elegant, and moving, Spike Jonze's film about a man in love with his operating system is a work of sincere and forceful humanism.
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Trans Style Magazine Candy Just Made History With Their Latest Cover - Styleite

Trans Style Magazine Candy Just Made History With Their Latest Cover - Styleite | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
It features 14 transgender women, including Laverne Cox, Geena Rocero, and Janet Mock.
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The Mako Mori Test: 'Pacific Rim' inspires a Bechdel Test alternative

The Mako Mori Test: 'Pacific Rim' inspires a Bechdel Test alternative | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
The Bechdel Test has long been the barometer of women-friendly films, but Pacific Rim fans say it doesn't give the movie's female lead enough credit.

Via Laura Brown
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Spike Jonze – Interviews | Little White Lies

Spike Jonze – Interviews | Little White Lies | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Her is a highly introspective film by a highly introspective guy. LWLies got up close and (too?) personal with the cherished American director.

Spike Jonze is known for his colourful, melancholic, immaculately-edited directorial style which he formulated by making music videos for the likes of Bjork, The Beastie Boys and REM. He has long since graduated to the world of inventive narrative cinema. In Jonze’s previous key offerings (Being John Malkovich, Adaptation., Where the Wild Things Are) he toyed with the line between external realities and the depth of human imagination. In Her, the voice in leading man Joaquin Phoenix’s head is artificial intelligence itself, making this film an ambitious exploration of the place where love meets future technology. When LWLies sat down to catch up with Jonze recently, we found the writer/director in refreshingly candid mood.
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Feminist Film Theory

Feminist Film Theory | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Feminist film theory has emerged in the past 20 years to become a large and flourishing field. Its dominant approach, exemplifed by such journals as Screen and Camera Obscura, involves a theoretical combination of semiotics, Althusserian Marxism, and Lacanian psychoanalysis. On this view, human subjects are formed through complex significatory processes,including cinema; traditional Hollywood cinema's "classic realist texts" are purveyors of bourgeois ideology. Added to this theory by Laura Mulvey's now-classic essay, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" [Mulvey, 1975], was the feminist claim that men and women are differentially positioned by cinema: men as subjects identifying with agents who drive the film's narrative forward, women as objects for masculine desire and fetishistic gazing. Mulvey's essay is heavily invested in theory. It is cited as "the founding document of feminist film theory" [Modleski 1989], as providing "the theoretical grounds for the rejection of Hollywood and its pleasures" [Penley 1988], and even as setting out feminist film theory's "axioms" [Silverman, quoted in Byars 1991]. Mulvey assumed a general picture of cinema as a symbolic medium which, like other aspects of mass culture, forms spectators as bourgeois subjects. She used Lacanian psychoanalysis to ground her account of gendered subjecivity, desire, and visual pleasure. Mulvey allowed little possibility of resistance or critical spectatorship, and recognized no variations in structure or effect of realist cinema. Unsurprisingly, her view has been much criticized and further refined, as writers (including Mulvey herself) have noted issues raised by differences among women, phenomena like male masochism, or genres that function in distinctive ways, such as comedy, melodrama, and horror. Still, writers in feminist film theory commonly assume Mulvey's basic parameters and take some version of psychoanalytic theory as a desideratum. Key issues are often seen only in terms of some refinement or qualification of psychoanalytic theory. Thus Barbara Creed's book The Monstrous-Feminine argues that the fact that women in horror films are often not victims but monsters "necessitates a rereading of key aspects of Freudian theory, particularly his theory of the Oedipus complex and castration crisis." [Creed 1993] Creed turns instead to Kristeva's theory of the abject and the maternal. Far less often, Mulvey's critics have adopted more sharply different theoretical bases such as cultural studies, identity politics, deconstruction, or the philosophy of Foucault.
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The top 10 films of 2014: Her

The top 10 films of 2014: Her | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
When I received an email from the Den of Geek editorial team asking me to contribute to the ‘film of the year’ write ups, I thought back briefly over the top films list I’d submitted. With the exception of Her, they were big blustery action films. Without even reading the contents of the email, I went and got my onomatopoeic dictionary. I was clearly going to be writing about some kersmashes and kabooms. Spike Jonze’s film Her isn’t a very explodey film, and when I realised it was the film I’d be covering, I threw my dictionary against the wall - kerthunk! It wasn’t a sad kerthunk, though, because I’ll take any chance I can get to go on about how brilliant Her is. Much as in my favourite films of the year list, it’s a film that stands out as unique amongst its contemporaries.

 
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Feminist Perspectives on the Self (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Feminist Perspectives on the Self (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
The topic of the self has long been salient in feminist philosophy, for it is pivotal to questions about personhood, identity, the body, and agency that feminism must address. In some respects, Simone de Beauvoir's trenchant observation, “He is the Subject, he is the Absolute—she is the Other,” sums up why the self is such an important issue for feminism. To be the Other is to be the non-subject, the non-person, the non-agent—in short, the mere body. In law, in customary practice, and in cultural stereotypes, women's selfhood has been systematically subordinated, diminished, and belittled, when it has not been outright denied. Since women have been cast as lesser forms of the masculine individual, the paradigm of the self that has gained ascendancy in U.S. popular culture and in Western philosophy is derived from the experience of the predominantly white and heterosexual, mostly economically advantaged men who have wielded social, economic, and political power and who have dominated the arts, literature, the media, and scholarship. Responding to this state of affairs, feminist philosophical work on the self has taken three main tacks: (1) critique of established views of the self, (2) reclamation of women's selfhood, and (3) reconceptualization of the self to incorporate women's experience. This entry will survey feminist perspectives on the self from all three of these angles.
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Why are female pop stars frequently accused of being men? - The Guardian

Why are female pop stars frequently accused of being men? - The Guardian | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Iggy Azalea is the latest prominent female popstar to be ‘called out’ for being born male. Are the false accusations just a rite of passage for singers, or something more sinister?
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Music industry continues to fight record leaks, but do they always hurt? - News1130

Music industry continues to fight record leaks, but do they always hurt? - News1130 | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Music industry continues to fight record leaks, but do they always hurt?
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The Final Hobbit Film: One Kick-Ass Chick Among the Sausagefest

The Final Hobbit Film: One Kick-Ass Chick Among the Sausagefest | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
You like battle scenes? You’ll probably like The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, the last of director Peter Jackson’s six films based on the work of J.R.R. Tolkien.
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The Best Music Marketing of 2014

The Best Music Marketing of 2014 | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
with the music industry in the grip of disruption, marketing becomes more important than ever. here are some of the best music marketing ideas of 2014.
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The Enemy: Race and Gender In Andrea Arnold’s ‘Wuthering Heights’

The Enemy: Race and Gender In Andrea Arnold’s ‘Wuthering Heights’ | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
This is a guest post by Brigit McCone.
Heathcliff is not white. Though his exact race is never defined, racial stigma is used to mark him as a threatening, “dark-skinned” outsider throughout Wuthering Heights.
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The year in TV: The rise of single-director television seasons - Sound On Sight

The year in TV: The rise of single-director television seasons - Sound On Sight | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
From the apparent death of the romantic sitcom to the resurgence of superhero shows, there have been a lot of developments in television over the year. But if there is one trend that has defined 2014 in television, it has been the migration of directors to the small screen for season-long projects. While not an idea that’s unique to the year, as the Jane Campion-helmed first season of Top of the Lake signalled the trend in 2013, this year’s television firmly established the migration as something more than a novelty.

Of course, big name directors hopping in for an episode or two of shows they are executive producers on is nothing new. Martin Scorsese’s direction in the pilot no doubt convinced some people to give Boardwalk Empire a chance, as did Neil Marshall’s work on the pilot of Constantine and Michael Mann’s helming of the pilot of Luck. However, the key aspect of 2014 television was that directors began to treat shows not as pit stops, but as season-long endeavours on which they could make their mark. The first example to burst on the scene this year was HBO’s True Detective, a series which owes a large amount of its acclaim to director Cary Fukunaga, who left his distinctive stamp on each episode, and was a large contributing factor in the season’s cohesiveness. However, he’s not the biggest example; that honour goes to Steven Soderbergh, who helmed every single episode of The Knick’s first season, helping elevate the Cinemax show in the process. The latter’s retirement from feature filmmaking meant his involvement in the tv show was a special treat for fans of the director. The message is clear; directors are no longer there to draw in viewers before handing off the reigns. They can be as involved in the television show as everyone else, and their presence would be evident.
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Here's why Roger Sterling is the best character on 'Mad Men' | Inside ...

Here's why Roger Sterling is the best character on 'Mad Men' | Inside ... | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
Mad Men is a show built almost entirely on the solid concrete foundation of its stellar character work. Sure, the dialogue is as sharp as a man in a grey flannel suit, and the metaphorical portents thrum like elevator ...
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What The Bechdel Test Is And Why Every Movie In Hollywood Needs To Pass It

What The Bechdel Test Is And Why Every Movie In Hollywood Needs To Pass It | A2 Media Studies | Scoop.it
What do "Up" "Toy Story" "Gladiator," and "Fight Club" all have in common?

Via Laura Brown
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