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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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How The Activity Learning Theory Works

How The Activity Learning Theory Works | A-X! | Scoop.it
How The Activity Learning Theory Works 

Vygotsky’s earlier concept of mediation, which encompassed learning alongside others (Zone of Proximal Development) and through interaction with artifacts, was the basis for Engeström’s version of Activity Theory (known as Scandinavian Activity Theory). Engeström’s approach was to explain human thought processes not simply on the basis of the individual, but in the wider context of the individual’s interactions within the social world through artifacts, and specifically in situations where activities were being produced.

In Activity Theory people (actors) use external tools (e.g. hammer, computer, car) and internal tools (e.g. plans, cognitive maps) to achieve their goals. In the social world there are many artifacts, which are seen not only as objects, but also as things that are embedded within culture, with the result that every object has cultural and/or social significance.

Tools (which can limit or enable) can also be brought to bear on the mediation of social interaction, and they influence both the behavior of the actors (those who use the tools) and also the social structure within which the actors exist (the environment, tools, artifacts). For further reading, here is Engeström’s own overview of 3 Generations of Activity Theory development. The first figure shows Second Generation AT as it is usually presented in the literature.

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Giacomo Bono's curator insight, April 1, 12:46 PM

Social interactions with close others, technology, and our motivation to master environments all work together to change us. An important process not represented in this otherwise cool model is close relationships with older peers and adults (i.e., community) who know kids and the learning task at hand well enough to use the ZPD to support their learning.

HC's curator insight, April 1, 7:08 PM

An interesting article on the Activity Theory where "people (actors) use external tools (e.g. hammer, computer, car) and internal tools (e.g. plans, cognitive maps) to achieve their goals." This article explores how this theory can be applied in education, "...teachers should be aware that everything in the classroom has a cultural and social meaning. " 

Kim Flintoff's curator insight, April 1, 7:15 PM

A useful framework that can move well into higher education to inform learning design.

Rescooped by Kurt Vega from iPads in Education
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Coding is the New Literacy - Think Playgrounds, Not Playpens - FRACTUS LEARNING

Coding is the New Literacy - Think Playgrounds, Not Playpens - FRACTUS LEARNING | A-X! | Scoop.it
There is no denying that coding is snowballing in importance across schools all around the world. Whether it’s Scratch, Programming Games or the Hour of Code, an understanding of software and the ability to code is fast becoming an essential skill for all 21st century learners.

At a recent TEDx event in Jackson Mississippi, Professor Marina Bers discussed her research into the design and study of innovative learning technologies to promote children’s positive development. How does this research manifest and present itself in the real world? Well programming robots of course!

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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from Connectivism
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In Connectivism, No One Can Hear You Scream: a Guide to Understanding the MOOC Novice - Hybrid Pedagogy

In Connectivism, No One Can Hear You Scream: a Guide to Understanding the MOOC Novice - Hybrid Pedagogy | A-X! | Scoop.it
This article is an attempt to address a possible gap in Connectivist thinking, and its expression in cMOOCs. It’s to do with the experience of technology novices, and unconfident learners...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from Educational Technology News
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Can Rapid Authoring Tools Deliver Responsive and Device Agnostic Content?

Can Rapid Authoring Tools Deliver Responsive and Device Agnostic Content? | A-X! | Scoop.it

"Device agnosticism is a hot topic in the web content development arena. Because of the fact that so many different devices with different screen sizes, specifications and operating systems are releasing every day, content developers are looking for ‘create-once-and-deliver-for-all’ kind of solutions. That’s where device agnosticism comes into the picture: writing content that’s suitable for most devices (ideally all devices) and be responsive nevertheless."


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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from Frontiers of Journalism
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The 6 reasons Ubernomics could be fatal to itself, its customers, and mass transit

The 6 reasons Ubernomics could be fatal to itself, its customers, and mass transit | A-X! | Scoop.it
Each time Uber angers customers with another surge pricing incident, or angers a city by ignoring its laws, an army of fans jump to its defense (as if Uber needs the help) and cry “free market." Then, self-congratulatory insults at stupid consumers or old fart city leaders are hurled, along with an easy, breezy explanation…

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from Megatrends
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A Strategist’s Guide to the Internet of Things

A Strategist’s Guide to the Internet of Things | A-X! | Scoop.it

Humanity has arrived at a critical threshold in the evolution of computing. By 2020, an estimated 50 billion devices around the globe will be connected to the Internet. Perhaps a third of them will be computers, smartphones, tablets, and TVs. The remaining two-thirds will be other kinds of “things”: sensors, actuators, and newly invented intelligent devices that monitor, control, analyze, and optimize our world.

 


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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:02 PM

The digital interconnection of billions of devices is today’s most dynamic business opportunity. This article questions how your company will build value in this new world. It will depend on the type of business you have today, the capabilities you can develop for tomorrow, and, most of all, your ability to understand the meaning of this new technology.


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Glenn Greenwald: Why privacy matters

Glenn Greenwald was one of the first reporters to see — and write about — the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States' extensive...
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Building A Better Version Of Capitalism Is A Massive Startup Opportunity | TechCrunch

Building A Better Version Of Capitalism Is A Massive Startup Opportunity | TechCrunch | A-X! | Scoop.it

Why, on a philosophical level, has Facebook been so staggeringly successful? A startup that swelled into a multi billion dollar revenue generating business in..


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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from The 21st Century
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32 Characteristics Of High-Performing Classrooms

32 Characteristics Of High-Performing Classrooms | A-X! | Scoop.it
32 Characteristics Of High-Performing Classrooms

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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from Community Managers
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Learning to Build Community Through Failure

Slides from my talk at the San Francisco Online Community meetup on May 28, 2014. 


Via Ally Greer
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Ally Greer's curator insight, May 29, 2014 4:06 PM

Last night, I spoke at the San Francisco Online Community meetup about what I learned from starting an ambassador program at Scoop.it before I really knew what exactly I was doing.


Though it didn't quite work out as I expected, I learned a lot, and have now launched a new community strategy that includes 4 tiers of community with different levels of activity and involvement.


I learned that you can't build community around just a brand, and that you can't force people to be a part of a community that they don't want to participate in.


I also learned the importance of a community content strategy. If you aren't consistently engaging community members with meaningful content, chances are they aren't going to come back.


**Stay tuned for video!**

Peg Corwin's curator insight, July 2, 2014 5:39 PM

Useful lessons learned include you can't make a community out of people who don't want to be a community.  Also that this community had 4 tiers, each reached in a different way.

Rescooped by Kurt Vega from Interactive Teaching and Learning
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The 6 Types of Creative Commons Licences Students (and Teachers) Should know about

The 6 Types of Creative Commons Licences Students (and Teachers) Should know about | A-X! | Scoop.it

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Steve Vaitl's curator insight, February 10, 2014 9:17 AM

"Creative commons" is not the same as "public domain"!! This infographic goes through the definition of the 6 different license available under Creative Commons.

Tracy Shaw's curator insight, March 31, 2014 11:02 AM

Helpful summary!

Rescooped by Kurt Vega from Infotention
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Focus@will

Focus@will | A-X! | Scoop.it
focus@will combines neuroscience + music to boost productivity and tune out distractions!

Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, February 26, 2014 1:35 PM

Apps like this are best approached with an open-minded skepticism. Open-minded because we're just beginning to see work on attention tools; skeptical because any mention of "neuroscience" raises the possibility of what has been called "neurobullocks" -- knowledge about the relationship between neural and attentional processes is very often nowhere near as precise as promoters would have us believe. Nevertheless, this is on my list to try out. I'll welcome feedback, both positive and negative, from anyone who tries this.

David McGavock's curator insight, February 27, 2014 4:56 PM

I concur with Howard Rheingold's advice that consumers be wary of claims to boost attention and productivity. At the same time ,improving attention is a very useful skill in these daze of distraction. We are just learning more about what works. Share your review of this and other such apps with Howard.

Rescooped by Kurt Vega from The future of medicine and health
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This Woman Invented a Way to Run 30 Lab Tests on Only One Drop of Blood - Wired Science

This Woman Invented a Way to Run 30 Lab Tests on Only One Drop of Blood - Wired Science | A-X! | Scoop.it

Phlebotomy. Even the word sounds archaic—and that’s nothing compared to the slow, expensive, and inefficient reality of drawing blood and having it tested. As a college sophomore, Elizabeth Holmes envisioned a way to reinvent old-fashioned phlebotomy and, in the process, usher in an era of comprehensive superfast diagnosis and preventive medicine. That was a decade ago. Holmes, now 30, dropped out of Stanford and founded a company called Theranos with her tuition money. Last fall it finally introduced its radical blood-testing service in a Walgreens pharmacy near the company headquarters in Palo Alto, California. (The plan is to roll out testing centers nationwide.) Instead of vials of blood—one for every test needed—Theranos requires only a pinprick and a drop of blood. With that they can perform hundreds of tests, from standard cholesterol checks to sophisticated genetic analyses. The results are faster, more accurate, and far cheaper than conventional methods. The implications are mind-blowing. With inexpensive and easy access to the information running through their veins, people will have an unprecedented window on their own health. And a new generation of diagnostic tests could allow them to head off serious afflictions from cancer to diabetes to heart disease.


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pillen-palast.com's curator insight, February 25, 2014 5:59 AM
http://www.pillen-palast.com/ Kamagra Tabletten, Kamagra Polo,Kamagra Oral Jelly
Rescooped by Kurt Vega from leapmind
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The metabolic footprint of aging in mice : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

The metabolic footprint of aging in mice : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | A-X! | Scoop.it

Aging is characterized by a general decline in cellular function, which ultimately will affect whole body homeostasis. Aging is characterized by a general decline in cellular function, which ultimately will affect whole body homeostasis. Although DNA damage and oxidative stress all contribute to aging, metabolic dysfunction is a common hallmark of aging at least in invertebrates. Since a comprehensive overview of metabolic changes in otherwise healthy aging mammals is lacking, we here compared metabolic parameters of young and 2 year old mice. We systemically integrated in vivo phenotyping with gene expression, biochemical analysis, and metabolomics, thereby identifying a distinguishing metabolic footprint of aging. Among the affected pathways in both liver and muscle we found glucose and fatty acid metabolism, and redox homeostasis. These alterations translated in decreased long chain acylcarnitines and increased free fatty acid levels and a marked reduction in various amino acids in the plasma of aged mice. As such, these metabolites serve as biomarkers for aging and healthspan.


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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from The future of medicine and health
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Gene linked to long life also protects against mental decline in old age

Gene linked to long life also protects against mental decline in old age | A-X! | Scoop.it
Discovery gives scientists hope of developing a therapy that could slowdown the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia

People who carry a mutated gene linked to longer lifespan have extra tissue in part of the brain that seems to protect them against mental decline in old age.

The finding has shed light on a biological pathway that researchers now hope to turn into a therapy that slows the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia.

Brain scans of more than 400 healthy men and women aged 53 and over found that those who carried a single copy of a particular gene variant had a larger brain region that deals with planning and decision making.

Further tests on the group found that those with an enlarged right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rDLPFC), as the brain region is known, fared better on a series of mental tasks.

About one in five people inherits a single copy of the gene variant, or allele, known as KL-VS, which improves heart and kidney function, and on average adds about three years to human lifespan, according to Dena Dubal, a neurologist at University of California, San Francisco.

Her latest work suggests that the same genetic mutation has broader effects on the brain. While having a larger rDLPFC accounted for only 12% of the improvement in people’s mental test scores, Dubal suspects the gene alters the brain in other ways, perhaps by improving the connections that form between neurons.


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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from leapmind
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Do You Have The ‘Smart Gene’ That Also Helps You Live Longer?

Do You Have The ‘Smart Gene’ That Also Helps You Live Longer? | A-X! | Scoop.it

Here’s hoping that this little genetic superpower is part of your DNA.


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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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MIT researchers show you can be identified by a just few data points | Mark Gibbs | NetworkWorld.com

MIT researchers show you can be identified by a just few data points | Mark Gibbs | NetworkWorld.com | A-X! | Scoop.it

If you thought sparse personal metadata - random chunks of data about data - was hard to mine for the purposes of identifying individuals, think again. MIT researchers have just shown that it only requires four data points (the dates and times of purchases) from a 30 day database of credit card purchases by 1.1 million people to identify 90 percent of them.

Metadata has been in the news extensively over the last couple of years mainly due to the Snowden revelations about NSA spying activities. But it's not just the government that wants to know who’s doing what, when, and why because every large commercial corporation also wants the same insights into people’s behavior.

 

But instead of (ostensibly) protecting us from terrorists as the government claims to be doing, the corporations want to figure out better ways to part us from our money. It's obvious that being able to chart consumers' economic perambulations across the commercial landscape is key to being competitive and the actionable insights gained from in-depth, accurate, and timely consumer surveillance can be the difference between a good quarter and a bad quarter.

What's a real concern is how easy tracking consumers has become. An MIT News article, “Privacy challenges” reported (the emphasis is mine):

 

Click headline to read more and access hot links--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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What you need to know about the New York City Wi-Fi payphone project | Esme Vos | MuniWireless

What you need to know about the New York City Wi-Fi payphone project | Esme Vos | MuniWireless | A-X! | Scoop.it

The primary goal of the New York City project to turn the old public payphones into “Public Communications Structures” (a fancy name for [mostly] digital advertising stations that happen to have Wi-Fi access points) is to bring money to the city. The city will not be spending any money at all for the project.


It is not a bridge-the-digital-divide project designed to provide cheap broadband to low-income people. Neither is it a municipal Wi-Fi project designed to bring Wi-Fi to every corner of the city.

 

The Wi-Fi access portion of this project is a nice touch, a side show at best. It gives the city (and the winning bidder) an opportunity to issue press releases that make them look as if they are on the forefront of Progress plus the mayor gets to prance around looking like a “man of the people”.

 

Plainly and simply, the city needs a lot of money (to fix the crumbling subway system, fill in the moon-crater potholes, clean the filthy streets, etc.) and this project is designed to bring in money.

 

One must divide these Public Communications Structures into two types:

 

(a) “Advertising Stations” (these have display ads and Wi-Fi APs with 1Gbps); and

 

(b) Non-advertising Stations (Wi-Fi only, 100 Mbps, but no ads).

The centrepoint of this project (and the only reason why anyone would be willing to spend $200 million or more) is the ADVERTISING REVENUE generated by the Advertising Stations. Ads will be shown to people passing by, the franchise owner will get paid and the city will get a cut, a generous one, actually, as there is a minimum guaranteed payment every year – $20 million in the first year, rising to over $70 million in the 15th year. What happens when the economy of NYC enters into a downturn? You know given the history of one of the members of the winning consortium, see details below.

 

Here’s what you need to know about the project — who won the public tender and what’s in the proposed contract (which you can download from the NYC DoITT website).

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Raymond Mastroianni, Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from iPads in Education
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Kathy Schrock: 6 Apps That Target Higher-Order Thinking Skills -- THE Journal

Kathy Schrock: 6 Apps That Target Higher-Order Thinking Skills -- THE Journal | A-X! | Scoop.it

"A higher-order thinker is a critical thinker. What are the attributes of a critical thinker? In The Miniature Guide to Critical Thinking Concepts and Tools, Richard Paul and Linda Elder describe a well-cultivated critical thinker as someone who:


raises vital questions and problems, formulating them clearly and precisely;gathers and assesses relevant information, using abstract ideas to interpret it effectively; comes to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions, testing them against relevant criteria and standards;thinks open-mindedly within alternative systems of thought, recognizing and assessing their assumptions, implications and practical consequences as need be; andcommunicates effectively with others in figuring out solutions to complex problems."


Via Dennis T OConnor, Dorian Love, starden, John Evans
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Maggie McGuirk Veres's curator insight, December 8, 2014 10:55 AM

Kathy Schrock rocks.

Jimun Gimm's curator insight, December 16, 2014 8:56 AM

당신의 통찰력을 추가 ...

Fiona Tavares's curator insight, January 5, 11:00 AM

Including use of Tellagami 

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The future of mankind and off-world transhuman settlements

The future of mankind and off-world transhuman settlements | A-X! | Scoop.it

Binary Cargo Consultancy specialises in foresight and innovation strategy, and helps organisations develop their innovation capabilities by becoming more agile and resilient.


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At-home brain stimulation gaining followers | Science News

At-home brain stimulation gaining followers | Science News | A-X! | Scoop.it

People are building at-home electric brain stimulators in hopes of becoming better gamers, problem solvers, and even to beat back depression.


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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from SCUP Links
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'It was not our intent to destroy universities ... . That's not why we did it.'

'It was not our intent to destroy universities ... . That's not why we did it.' | A-X! | Scoop.it

Love this.


"It wasn't our intent, I just want to be clear about that now, it was not our intent to destroy universities. That's not why we did it. We want to change universities, and we want them to work for the better.

Thinking in Models: for Design, for Learning…

A large part of this talk is about that change. It's interesting. We go from the first slide about people wanting to be relevant, wanting universities to be relevant, all the way to the last slide about what's going to replace universities, without doing all the thinking that we need to do in between. We need to do this thinking in between.

Let's begin our thinking with where the current trends, we're told, are going. We're told there will be tiered service models at universities. We're told there will be analytics and data-driven management. We're told there will be alternative credentials. To a certain degree, all of these three things are true.

To a certain degree, none of these three things are going to work themselves out in the way that the economist or economists or education reformers predict. When you look at that, basically it's like they have this model or design in their head of how we could rebuild the university system, wipe it all out, start over, and we'll have a new model.




Figure 1 - workflow process employed to assist LMS selection

This model of accountability and cost frameworks and all of that will solve all the problems that the current system has. Models are popular in education too. Here's a model (Figure 1) of a workflow-processed employee to assist LMS selection. You can't really read the small writing there. It goes from enrollment to program administration to learner interactions to content creation to assessment.

It's a fishbone diagram. If you're in economics or business, you're probably familiar with it.Models of how to select educational technology including customized lists of LMS features, a way of picking among those 305 features of a learning management system that you might want to solve the educational problems at your institution."


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, August 25, 2014 9:28 PM

You really need to read this. Or at least skim it. This is not your ordinary POV. "I criticize Coursera. I criticize the Stanford MOOCs and all of that, but when Norvig and Thrun launched their artificial intelligence MOOC, in the first week, 150,000 people signed up. Overall, I think it was something like 250,000 people signed up for one course, a really hard course that's really difficult to understand, in artificial intelligence.


Forget the fact that a lot of them dropped out. A lot of them didn't. Tens of thousands finished. This, by itself, indicates that the old model wasn't working. There was such a pent-up demand for upper-level university courses in artificial intelligence that, when one was finally made available, people knocked down the doors trying to get to it."

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2013: Brain Chips, Wearable Gadgets, and Wrist Computers—The Year’s Most Important Stories

2013: Brain Chips, Wearable Gadgets, and Wrist Computers—The Year’s Most Important Stories | A-X! | Scoop.it

Although the groundwork was laid in previous years, in 2013 it became apparent that computers mounted on your wrist and face will preoccupy the computing industry for years to come.

One of our first stories of the year noted the launch of the crowdfunded smart watch Pebble, a product that seemingly catalyzed the resurgence of interest in wrist-mounted computers from gadget buyers and companies large and small. Soon after that, we picked smart watches as one of MIT Technology Review’s 10 Breakthrough Technologies of 2013.

Rumors swirled throughout the year, without any definitive proof, that Microsoft, Google, and Apple were all working on smart watches. But the world’s largest smartphone maker, Samsung, did launch a smart watch called the Galaxy Gear, which has the processing power of a smartphone and even a 1.9-megapixel camera. Qualcomm, which makes more smartphone processors than any other company, also launched a smart watch. Called the Toq, it features a novel display technology that borrows a trick from butterfly wings to display crisp colors even in bright light.


Via Alin Velea
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Rescooped by Kurt Vega from Looking Forward: Creating the Future
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What's next -- the horizon of our dreams: David Brin at TEDxSanDiego

Fifty years from now, will we have destroyed the world? Or saved it? It's not too soon to ask. Little more than 100 years ago, the mundane acts of our 21st Century daily life were strictly the purview of the gods: To take flight and traverse a continent in just hours...To splash daylight across a massive arena on a moonless night with the touch of one finger..

"The more god-like we've become, the more our humility is affected." And if we don't give serious thought to our trajectory as a global society, if we spend too much time looking backward nostalgically rather than ahead thoughtfully, we will succumb to ourselves. Because, "the default human society is flawed", and it is up to us to fight against that default.


Via GDBrin
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tentuseful's comment, January 17, 4:22 AM
Its ideal
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The Next Generation in Neural Prosthetics

The Next Generation in Neural Prosthetics | A-X! | Scoop.it

Following up on the success of cochlear and retinal prostheses for people who have lost sensory function, neuroscientists see a limitless horizon for related devices that are able to read electrical and chemical signals from the nervous system to stimulate capability and restore quality of life in persons suffering injury and disease.

In the future, according to researchers, the devices – known as neural prosthetics – will help epileptics, persons with treatment-resistant depression and chronic pain, victims of Alzheimer’s disease, wounded war veterans suffering post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, persons with speech disabilities, and individuals who have sustained spinal cord injury and loss of limbs, among other applications in the research pipeline.

But before neural prosthetics can advance, engineers will be called on to make innovative use of materials to design and fabricate devices that allow sustained electronic functioning in the harsh environment of the human body, without causing tissue infection and other serious adverse conditions. Research efforts have focused on enhancing the performance of various types of materials used in neural prosthetics, in addition to developing interface technologies that enable the micro devices to be safely implanted in human tissue for long periods.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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aanve's curator insight, March 1, 2014 10:05 PM

www.aanve.com

 

Richard Platt's curator insight, March 2, 2014 11:46 AM

Very interesting wearable - on the inside of the body, - their big issue is having to solve the contradiction of stiff and flexible, turns out it is what is known as Physical Contradiction based on time.  Numerous inventive principles for solving that problem. 

Jordan Melnik's curator insight, March 27, 6:16 AM

This source further discusses the use of brain signals for prosthetics. It also discusses the progression of this technology and its importance.