A Virtual Worlds Miscellany
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A Virtual Worlds Miscellany
A collection on virtual worlds, with emphasis on Second Life and the Open Simulator Worlds. Also, roleplay.
Curated by Asil
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Versu Gets A Second Life » Ciaran Laval

Versu Gets A Second Life » Ciaran Laval | A Virtual Worlds Miscellany | Scoop.it

Oh come on, someone was always going to use that headline!....


Via Talla Adam
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Talla Adam's curator insight, June 11, 2014 11:19 PM

Personally, I'm really glad Emily Short was able to get a deal from the Lab. It makes so much sense to give Versu another chance and not just leave it on the shelf to be forgotten. So much work had already gone into the product it was a shock to everyone that enjoys text adventures and interactive fiction when the new CEO at Linden Lab decided it wasn't a "compelling new experience" as he described the other products they wanted to concentrate on when making his decision.

In one sense I have to agree with Ebbe in that there was no way to integrate Versu into Second Life which would have been a fantastic tool for adding a story telling form of AI to animated bot's but, then again, SL doesn't have the advanced NPC functions that Opensim has so I guess there was no easy way to do it. So, while I'm glad for the new Little Story People team it would have been so much better in my view had the Lab kept Versu and got to grips with developing proper NPC's and Interactive Fiction tools for the many creative talent's in Second Life to work with.

Working in Opensim with NPC's and the advanced OSSL functions we are beginning to achieve things that suit interactive fiction story telling where the NPC characters can actually engage in conversation, respond with gestures and animations, and show like and dislike for each other, and even you the player. This demonstrates just how Versu might have worked in Second Life. In my view the Lab too often misses its best opportunities to improve their virtual world product in terms of a "compelling experience" and that is another reason I, personally, don't limit myself to Second Life alone any more.

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Revisiting the announcements of CGTextures and Renderosity re: LL's new ToS - Mona Eberhardt

Revisiting the announcements of CGTextures and Renderosity re: LL's new ToS - Mona Eberhardt | A Virtual Worlds Miscellany | Scoop.it
The reaction we saw from CGTextures and Renderosity is disproportionate and, especially in Renderosity’s case, it crosses the line and shows a petty, overly dramatic and essentially bullying attitude towards the very people that paid Renderosity good money to buy its stock content

Via Talla Adam
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Talla Adam's curator insight, November 8, 2013 11:39 AM

 

Hmm, my comment to the blog got blocked! So, here it is...

 

QUOTE:
 "What does this mean, in practical terms? That you simply may not upload a Renderosity product to Second Life, InWorldz, AviNation, Kitely, or any other virtual world grid. Why? Because, by uploading a Renderosity product to any of the aforementioned grids, you:

    Are storing the product in a place where it can be used by another person or party."
UNQUOTE.

To my mind this is not correct. If I upload a texture to Second Life or an Opensim grid that does not automatically make it possible for someone else to access my inventory and make use of the texture. I would have to send them the texture or give them access to my inventory which, if I respect the license terms of the product, I will not do. Thus, the product is not stored where another person can get at it unless you want to start talking about grid owners having access to databases which, well, Linden Lab has always had access to their databases anyway and Renderosity knows this but, in the past,  the Lab never said they reserved the right to make use of resident content anyway they wish and forever without recompense to the owner which, effectively, is what the change in LL TOS is saying now. So, really, I don't think the argument you gave above in this instance holds up.

You appear, if I might be so bold, to be trying to make the problem that Renderosity has with Linden Lab a problem for Opensim grids as well. And yet they all have their own TOS which are, for the most part, worded much differently than the Second Life TOS. In fact some, Kitely - since you named that grid - for example, has gone on record to say they respect copyrights and do not make any claim to content uploaded by residents.

I have, myself, spoken to CGTextures in an email and was given assurance they have no problem with Opensim grids presently but I did not get to speak to Renderosity yet. I may yet do so.

What the Lab did, in changing their TOS, was to clearly give themselves rights over resident content to use in anyway they wish across their whole product range, for ever. Now, you can make excuses for the Lab and apologize for their incompetence but you can't go sweeping this issue under the carpet and bury it in a long winded attempt at legal speak which, frankly, suffers from a more than a touch of intellectual preaching while blasting other bloggers as inferior mischief makers.

There are some very good articles out there on this matter and what you wrote I respect as your opinion with good points being made. But it is not short on inaccuracies too.