A Thousand Splendid Suns; Women's Rights
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Afghanistan Poverty Map

Afghanistan Poverty Map | A Thousand Splendid Suns; Women's Rights | Scoop.it
Theresa Scheet's insight:

Poverty in Afghanistan is based on food source. As you can see, the majority of Afghanistan is at high risk of food insecurity. The Afghan people don't have enough money for food. Poverty is one of the main reasons daughters are married off. Fathers marry off their daughters so they can feed their families.

 

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Forced Marriages in Afghanistan

Video I made for a school project.
Theresa Scheet's insight:

This video starts out telling a story of a girl who was married to a 60 year old man at the age of 9. 60% of women are still married as children. The law that only 16 and older can marry is ignored by families and the government. This girl was abused for no reason at all. Also, he made her travel where they were not known, where he told men she was his daughter and sold her body (prostitute). She says "He would not care if I were alive or dead," (video). The only way to end the suffering is to educate people.

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Rooftops of Tehran

Rooftops of Tehran | A Thousand Splendid Suns; Women's Rights | Scoop.it
In a middle-class neighborhood of Iran’s sprawling capital city, 17-year-old Pasha Shahed spends the summer of 1973 on his rooftop with his best friend Ahmed, dreaming about the future and asking burning questions about life.
Theresa Scheet's insight:

Rooftops of Tehran looks very interesting because it seems to be verys similar to the plotline of A Thousand Splendid Suns. In this one, a boy is in love with his neighbor, but she already has an aranged fiance. I'm interested in seeing how old traditional tribes' cultures affect people instead of the Taliban law.

 

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A Thousand Splendid Suns: Khaled Hosseini

This book, A Thousand Splendid Suns, is mostly about how two girls' lives became connected during during the war. It starts with Mariam as a child, born out of wedlock and ultimately a disgrace, and moves chronologically along her life through the escalating war. She lived as an outcast with her mother, Nana, because her father had and Nana had an affair against his 3 current wives. Her mother commits suicide and her father and 3 stepmothers marry her off quickly after to a man named Rasheed. The novel switches to the second girl, Laila, who grew up with a loving father, depressed mother and a childhood love, and depicts her life experience and how the war influenced her life. Laila's mother is depressed because her sons went off to fight the war and died. Laila and her childhood triend Tariq are in love, but Tariq and his family left to escape the war. 17 days later, she and her family are about to escape as well when the house is blown up and Laila is the only survivor. She is rescued from the rubble by Rasheed (her neighbor) and nursed back to help. She ends up quickly marrying him because she is pregnant with Tariq's baby and must cover it up and pretend it is Rasheed's child. Ultimately, the author, Khaled Hosseini, wanted to show how two separate women from basically opposite upbringings end up in the same tragedy and stripped of their rights because of war.
Theresa Scheet's insight:

I thought the book was very inspiring, showing how two women fight through life and war and tragedy, despite their complete lack of control/ rights. I liked it alot, though most of the time I was mad at how nothing ever seemed to go right for them, that one bad thing kept happening after another for both Mariam and Laila. They were both plagued with death of the only ones they loved, and only had eachother and their children. It made me grateful for my life here in America where women are equal and we don't have to fear for our lives and the lives of the ones we love to be taken by bombs and missiles.

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Women must be recognized as humans

Theresa Scheet's insight:

The Ruidad weekly magazine, speaking out for women's rights, is a symbol for hope and change in Afghanistan. It tells women of their responsibilities and rights as human beings and that they must stand up for themselves. With strength in numbers, there is no way the Taliban and strict Afghan men can stifle women any longer.

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Afghan Child Brides Escape Marriage, but Not Lashes - NYTimes.com

Afghan Child Brides Escape Marriage, but Not Lashes - NYTimes.com | A Thousand Splendid Suns; Women's Rights | Scoop.it
The ordeal of two Afghan girls who were flogged for running away underscores the fact that forced marriage is a cultural norm in parts of Afghanistan.
Theresa Scheet's insight:

These 13 and 14 year old girls were illigally flogged by the very officials that are supposed to enforce the laws. They were running from a forced marriage to significantly older men (40+ years old) and were punished for it.43% of Afghan marriages involve brides under the age of 18. As an 18 year old, I can't imagine marrying now, much less 4 years ago at the age of 14.

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Landmine Map: Afghanistan

Landmine Map: Afghanistan | A Thousand Splendid Suns; Women's Rights | Scoop.it
Theresa Scheet's insight:

Afghanistan is still covered in landmine fields. The red dots represent mines. The people who live in these places are most likely unaware of the incredible danger they are in.

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Afghan landmine blast kills girls

Afghan landmine blast kills girls | A Thousand Splendid Suns; Women's Rights | Scoop.it
At least nine young girls are killed and two others injured in a landmine explosion in eastern Afghanistan, officials say. (RT @UNICEF: Our thoughts & prayers are with the families of the 9 girls killed by a landmine explosion in Afghanistan.
Theresa Scheet's insight:

9 young girls were killed in a landmine explosion in Afghanistan. It is unknown whether the mine was recently planted by the Taliban or if it was left over from the many past decades of war. Unexploded, yet still active, mines like these are commonly found in rural areas. Only four of the nine bodies were recognized and identified.

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Afghanistan

Afghanistan | A Thousand Splendid Suns; Women's Rights | Scoop.it
Theresa Scheet's insight:

Afghanistan is located in south-central Asia. Kabul is its capital, but is not exactly a place you want to willingly go. Afghanistan is in heavy turmoil as a country with many Rebel groups causing havock. Women have very little rights in Afghanistan and are in great danger if they step out of line.

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For peace in Afghanistan, women can't be 'secondary'

For peace in Afghanistan, women can't be 'secondary' | A Thousand Splendid Suns; Women's Rights | Scoop.it
Afghanistan's religious authority declares women as 'secondary' and seeks restrictions on them. Karzai approves, perhaps to win over the Taliban in talks. But the outrage from Afghan women shows they no longer see themselves as willing victims.
Theresa Scheet's insight:

Ever since the end of the Taliban rule in Afghanistan 10 years ago, women's rights have greatly progressed. Women work and study alongside men and have rights set into the Constitution. However, recently a council of Islamic scholars declared that women are secondary to men. What is worse is that the Afghan president endorsed this statement. His indirect reason for this is the upcoming talks with the Taliban, hoping to bring peace. The article argues that they cannot use women's rights as means of negotiation with the Taliban; they must be firmly upheld even if that means the Taliban are unhappy. After this declaration, there were many protests which shows that women are no longer content with their role as 'secondary' people; they realize their need to act as equal to men in public life.

 

 

Ever since the end of the Taliban rule in Afghanistan 10 years ago, women's rights have greatly progressed. Women work and study alongside men and have rights set into the Constitution. However, recently a council of Islamic scholars declared that women are secondary to men. What is worse is that the Afgan president endorsed this statement. His indirect reason for this is the upcoming talks with the Taliban, hoping to bring peace. The article argues that they cannot use women's rights as means of negotiation with the Taliban; they must be firmly upheld even if that means the Taliban are unhappy. After this declaration, there were many protests which shows that women are no longer content with their role as 'secondary' people; they realize their need to act for their rights.

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What About Afghan Women?

Theresa Scheet's insight:

This 18 year old girl had her nose and ears chopped off as punishment by the abusive husband she was trying to escape. The scary part is the officials ordered her punishment. Women in Afghanistan are suffering while we American women are extremely fortunate. Here, we fret over women driver jokes, while in Afghanistan, they fear daily abuse and deadly punishment if they rebel against it.

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Nightmare Nuptials

Nightmare Nuptials | A Thousand Splendid Suns; Women's Rights | Scoop.it
Most girls dream about about falling in love, getting married in a beautiful dress, and having a family. But for thousands of young Afghan girls, and millions more across Asia and Africa, marriag...
Theresa Scheet's insight:

(Relief organization) This article is informational, telling of marriages in Afghanistan. The issue is that girls as young as 9 and 10 are forced into arranged marriages with much older men (40s) and end up abused. 57 percent of Afghan marriages involve girls under 16 despite the law in place stating that they must be over the age of 16, while 80 percent of the marriages are arranged. Most all of the time the first time they meet their husbands is the day of the wedding. They say the main reason for these marriages is money. They marry off their daughters because they are seen as second class people and want to avoid the cost of caring for them.Young marriages have contributed to high rates of death among women, infant mortality, and particularly maternal deaths. At 44, an Afghan woman's life expectancy is one of the lowest in the world.

 

Up to 80% of Afghan marriages are forced or arranged. Many girls are married as early as 9 or 10 years old. In America, 10 year old girls worry about 4th grade school work and toys. In Afghanistan, they worry about caring for a house, much older husband, and even bearing children. Not to mention a vast majority of Afghan wives are physically, emotionally, and sexually. If they try to escape their husbands, abusive or not, they are severly punished. They have no freedom and no way out.

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