A Tale of Two Med...
Follow
Find
4.7K views | +1 today
 
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
onto A Tale of Two Medicines
Scoop.it!

Detoxication of Airborne Pollutants by Broccoli Sprout Beverage.

Detoxication of Airborne Pollutants by Broccoli Sprout Beverage. | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

This week in the journal Cancer Prevention Research, scientists from Johns Hopkins and China's Qidong Liver Cancer Institute report that daily consumption of a half-cup of "broccoli-sprout beverage"—a tea made with broccoli sprouts—produced rapid, sustained, high-level excretion of benzene in research subjects' urine. Their conclusion, building on prior research, is that broccoli helps the human body break down benzene and excrete its byproducts. As benzene is a known human carcinogen commonly found in polluted air in both urban and rural areas, voiding it is an unmitigated virtue.

 

The broccoli-sprout beverage also increased the levels of the lung irritant acrolein, another common air pollutant, in the subjects' urine. 

more...
No comment yet.
A Tale of Two Medicines
Natural Medicine, Pharmaceuticals and GMO’s, the Good, the Bad and the OMG! - (The information provided is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.  Never disregard professional medical advice, or delay in seeking it, because of something you have read on this scoopit page.)
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

White tea (Camellia sinensis) inhibits proliferation of the colon cancer cell line, HT-29, activates caspases and protects DNA of normal cells against oxidative damage

The present study demonstrates the antioxidant, anticancer and DNA protective effects of white tea (C.sinensis). White tea extract exhibited a strong antioxidant activity in the five assays carried out, i.e., the FRAP, DPPH, nitric oxide, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical scavenging assays. The high antioxidant activities correlated significantly to their phenolic content. Pre-treatment of 3T3-L1 cells with the extract protected against H2O2-induced DNA damage.

 

The tea extracts also showed high anti-proliferative activity against HT-29 cells, without being toxic to normal fibroblasts. The extract inhibited HT-29 colon cancer cells by the death receptor and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways as demonstrated by increased expression levels of caspases-3/7, -8 and -9.

 

In conclusion, white tea extracts show potential as chemotherapeutic agents. Regular consumption of white tea could maintain good health and protect the body against disease.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Steamed ginger (Zingiber officinale): Changed chemical profile and increased anticancer potential

Ginger, from the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Rosco (Zingiberaceae), is a common condiment for foods and beverages. In this work, we tested a hypothesis that a steaming process affects the chemical profile and anticancer potential of ginger. An HPLC method with TOF/MS and DAD was developed to analyse the chemical constituents in ginger. The antiproliferative effect of fresh, dried and steamed gingers was evaluated using human Hela cancer cells. The results showed that the antiproliferative effect of steamed ginger at 120 °C for 4 h was approximately 1.5- and 2-fold higher than that of dried and fresh ginger, respectively. Twenty-two components were characterised in the steamed ginger. The decreased concentration of gingerols and increased levels of shogaols contributed to the improved anticancer potential of the steamed ginger. This study elucidated the relationship of the heating process with the constituents and anticancer activity, and developed an optimised processed ginger extract for chemoprevention.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Nature’s pharmacy – plant-based active substance kills renal cancer cells

Nature’s pharmacy – plant-based active substance kills renal cancer cells | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

Nature holds many compounds in store that are of great value to medical research. Recently, for example, scientists discovered that a substance contained in an African shrub kills cancer cells in the kidney. Together with colleagues from Berlin and Leeds, researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund discovered that the molecule known as englerin A significantly increases the concentration of calcium in cells, causing the cancer cells to die. Englerin A only activates the calcium channels of renal cancer cells, but not those of healthy cells. In cooperation with the Lead Discovery Center in Dortmund, the scientists now want to find out whether englerin A could potentially be used as an innovative drug to treat renal cancer in the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Serum tocopherol levels and vitamin E intake are associated with lung function in the normative aging study.

The results of studies assessing relationships between vitamin E intake and status and lung function are conflicting. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of vitamin E intake and serum levels of tocopherol isoforms on lung function in a cross-sectional sample of 580 men from the Normative Aging Study, a longitudinal aging study.

 

Regression models were used to look at associations of serum tocopherol isoform levels and vitamin E intake with lung function parameters after adjustment for confounders. Vitamin E intake was measured using a food frequency questionnaire and serum levels of γ, α, and δ-tocopherol levels were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography.

 

After adjustment for potential confounders, serum γ-tocopherol had a significant inverse association with forced vital capacity (β = −0.10, p = 0.05). Alpha and δ-tocopherol were not associated with any lung function parameter. After classifying COPD status according to Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage criteria, serum levels of δ-tocopherol were lower in participants with more severe COPD (p = 0.01). Serum levels of δ-tocopherol were also lower in participants with greater levels of smoking (p = 0.02). Both vitamin E intake (β = 0.03, p = 0.02; β = 0.03, p = 0.01) and use of vitamin E supplements (β = 0.05, p = 0.03; β = 0.06. p = 0.02) were positively associated with FEV1 and FVC, after adjusting for confounders. Subjects who took vitamin E supplements had significantly higher α-tocopherol levels (p < 0.0001) and lower γ-tocopherol levels (p < 0.0001) than non-users.

 

In this study, there is a positive association between dietary vitamin E intake and lung function, and evidence of an inverse relationship between serum levels of γ-tocopherol and lung function.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Green tea extract may boost ‘metabolic efficiency’ and help endurance training: Human data

Green tea extract may boost ‘metabolic efficiency’ and help endurance training: Human data | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it
Supplements of green tea extract may enhance performance in active men by improving metabolic efficiency and economy, says a new study.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

High Dose Intraveneous Vitamin C and Chikungunya Fever: A Case Report

The Chikungunya (CHIKV) fever is a viral disease produced by a single-stranded RNA Alphavirus from the Togaviridae genus. Its transmission occurs only through mosquito vectors, principally Aedes aegypti. It requires a human-mosquito-human transmission cycle. It is associated with severe arthritis/arthralgias, myalgias, high fever, headache, and maculopapular rash. Joint ache appears to be symmetrical. The virus has an incubation period of 2 to 7 days, where the high fever is typically presented. It is followed by arthralgias and myalgias, and rashes, which last for 3 to 5 days. However, the arthralgias can persist for months after the infection, which can contribute to severe arthritis. As of now, no vaccine exists for the virus and no official treatment has been developed aside from standard procedures of the use of acetaminophen (paracetamol), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This is a case report of a 54-year old Hispanic individual that reported left shoulder pain, left knee pain and fever. The symptoms started on a Saturday in September 2014 in middle of the night. The patient was treated with high doses of intravenous vitamin C over two days. The symptoms resolved after the infusions without any side effects. Based on the positive outcome in this case, we propose that intravenous vitamin C should be studied further as a potential treatment for acute viral infections.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Garlic could aid cystic fibrosis fight

Garlic could aid cystic fibrosis fight | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

A chemical in garlic kills bacteria that cause deadly infections in people with cystic fibrosis, University research shows.

 

The study reveals that the chemical - known as allicin - could be an effective treatment against infectious bacteria that are highly resistant to most antibiotics.

 

Allicin is produced naturally by garlic bulbs to ward off a closely-related group of plant pathogens found in soil and water habitats.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Effect of green tea (matcha) on gastrointestinal tract absorption of polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins in rats.

This paper presents the liver distribution and fecal excretion of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) congeners and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) congeners, in male rats fed with powdered green tea (matcha). The rats were given a treatment diet containing 10% matcha for the first five days. Then, the animals were administered 4 g of 10% matcha diet containing 0.5 ml of the casual rice-bran oil of Yusho that had occurred in the Southwest part of Japan in 1968 and kept on the same diet for another five days. The fecal excretion of PCB, PCDF and PCDD in the group fed with 10% matcha were 4.4, 2.4-9.1 and 2.5-4.7 times higher (p < 0.01), respectively, than that in the control group. The liver distribution of PCB, PCDF and PCDD in the same groups were 79%, 20-75% and 26-67% of the control group, respectively. These findings suggest that administration of matcha is useful as a treatment of Yusho patients exposed to PCB, PCDF and PCDD.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Four types of fatty acids exert differential impact on pancreatic cancer growth

Four types of fatty acids exert differential impact on pancreatic cancer growth | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

Increased fatty acids (FAs) regulate pancreatic cancer progression, however, the detailed mechanism is not clear, and different forms of FAs may play diversified roles in pancreatic cancer. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we compared the effects of four major types of FAs on pancreatic cancer growth both in cell culture and in a mouse model. HPAF pancreatic cancer cells were implanted in nude mice for 14 weeks, and the mice were fed with four different high-fat/high-energy diets (15% fat, 4 kcal/g), an iso-caloric diet (5% fat, 4 kcal/g) and a normal diet (4% fat, 3 kcal/g). The high fat diets were rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n6- and n3PUFAs), respectively. Whilst n3PUFA diet decreased tumor viability, the other high fat diets stimulated tumor viability by apparently different mechanisms. For instance, xenografts whose carriers were fed with SFA diet had marked expression of cancer-related proteins and lipid droplets. Although mice that were fed with MUFA- and n6PUFA diets had pancreatic tumors of similar size, liver metastasis occurred more frequently in those with the n6PUFA diet. In experiments in vitro, HPAF-cell population was increased by SFAs and MUFAs, decreased by n3PUFAs and not changed by n6PUFAs. In conclusion, different fatty acids have different impact on pancreatic cancer cells. The effects of fatty acids on pancreatic cancer cells were consistent in vivo and in vitro except that n6PUFAs only had regulatory effects in vivo.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Food-derived polyphenols inhibit pancreatic cancer growth through mitochondrial cytochrome C release and apoptosis.

Food-derived polyphenols inhibit pancreatic cancer growth through mitochondrial cytochrome C release and apoptosis. | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

There is increasing evidence that food-derived polyphenols have a beneficial effect for cancers. Our purpose was to determine the effect and mechanism of action of these compounds on pancreatic cancer. We measured effects of quercetin on pancreatic cancer in a nude mouse model. We also investigated the effects of quercetin, rutin, trans-resveratrol and genistein on apoptosis and underlying signaling in pancreatic carcinoma cells in vitro. Quercetin decreased primary tumor growth, increased apoptosis and prevented metastasis in a model of pancreatic cancer. In vitro quercetin and trans-resveratrol, but not rutin, markedly enhanced apoptosis, causing mitochondrial depolarization and cytochrome c release followed by caspase-3 activation. In addition, the effect of a combination of quercetin and trans-resveratrol on mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activity was greater than the expected additive response. The inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition prevented cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis caused by polyphenols. Nuclear factor-κB activity was inhibited by quercetin and trans-resveratrol, but not genistein, indicating that this transcription factor is not the only mediator of the polyphenols' effects on apoptosis. The results suggest that food-derived polyphenols inhibit pancreatic cancer growth and prevent metastasis by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting in cytochrome c release, caspase activation and apoptosis.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Efficacy of Garcinia kola 0.5% Aqueous Eye Drops in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension

Efficacy of Garcinia kola 0.5% Aqueous Eye Drops in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

To evaluate the intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering efficacy of Garcinia kola 0.5% aqueous solution eye drops in patients with newly diagnosed primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension (POAG/OH).

 

A randomized, double-masked, multicenter, active-controlled prospective study. Patients who met the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned in equal numbers to receive Timolol 0.5% eye drops as a control medication (A = Group 1 eyes) or Garcinia kola 0.5% eye drops as the study medication (B = Group 2 eyes). All drops were instilled at 6 am and 6 pm daily. Goldman applanation tonometry was performed at 9 am, 12 pm and 3 pm at baseline, week-6, week-12 and week-24 visits. Voluntary and actively elicited reports of adverse events were documented. The mean change in IOP over 24 weeks was the primary outcome measure. Both groups were compared for statistically significant differences at all visits. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

 

A total of 178 patients were randomly assigned to G. kola and Timolol groups. At baseline there were no differences in mean IOP between groups, based on age, sex, or diagnosis. At the end of the study period (24th week), the mean (± SD) reduction in IOP was 12.93 ± 2.3 mmHg (47.8% ± 0.8% reduction) in G. Kola group and 13.09 ± 2.8 mm Hg (48.2% ± 1.03% reduction) in the Timolol group (P > 0.05). Adverse events were mild in nature with no statistically significant differences between groups (P > 0.05).


Garcinia kola ophthalmic solution significantly reduces IOP as compared to baseline. The IOP lowering effect of both treatments was equivalent.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Nutritional medicine as mainstream in psychiatry.

Psychiatry is at an important juncture, with the current pharmacologically focused model having achieved modest benefits in addressing the burden of poor mental health worldwide. Although the determinants of mental health are complex, the emerging and compelling evidence for nutrition as a crucial factor in the high prevalence and incidence of mental disorders suggests that diet is as important to psychiatry as it is to cardiology, endocrinology, and gastroenterology. Evidence is steadily growing for the relation between dietary quality (and potential nutritional deficiencies) and mental health, and for the select use of nutrient-based supplements to address deficiencies, or as monotherapies or augmentation therapies. We present a viewpoint from an international collaboration of academics (members of the International Society for Nutritional Psychiatry Research), in which we provide a context and overview of the current evidence in this emerging field of research, and discuss the future direction. We advocate recognition of diet and nutrition as central determinants of both physical and mental health.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

The Epigenetic Impact of Cruciferous Vegetables on Cancer Prevention.

Many studies have contributed to the incorporation of dietary agents as forms of cancer remediation. Cruciferous vegetables are enriched with several chemical components that have tremendous negative effects on multiple pathways of cancer cells due to their anti-proliferative and anti-tumorigenic properties. The consumption of these vegetables is beneficial in the sense that they are precursors to glucosinolates which give rise to isothiocyanates such as sulforaphane and indoles such as indole-3-carbinol. Most cancers are characterized by the overexpression of HDAC and DNMT and the mis-expression of miRNAs. Both I3C and SFN are inhibitors and regulators of these processes and the incorporation of these compounds causes cancerous cell lines to take on a healthier and more normalized appearance. In addition, significant decreases in uncontrolled cell growth as well as increases in programed cell death are noticed with the incorporation of SFN and I3C. Many studies reveal that cruciferous vegetables are key instruments in advancing progress toward the prevention of cancer. Future studies will undoubtedly be directed toward further deciding the epigenetic events impacted by the bioactive components of cruciferous vegetables and their significance with respect to not only cancer prevention but also many other biological processes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Lutein’s role in reducing systemic inflammation revealed

Lutein’s role in reducing systemic inflammation revealed | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

Increased intakes of lutein may not only have a direct beneficial role in the macula of the eye, but may also help fight systemic inflammation, according to a new study.

 

Macula is a yellow spot of about five millimeters diameter on the retina. A thin macular pigment can allow the blue light through and destroy the cells. Maintaining high levels of both carotenoids, and therefore the macular pigment, is a valid approach to maintaining eye health and reducing the risk of diseases, like AMD.

 

The new study, published in Acta Ophthalmology , adds to an ever growing body of science supporting the vital role of the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin for eye health. These compounds are the only carotenoids capable of filtering the harmful blue light than can damage cells in the eye, the rods and the cones.

 

The researchers recruited 70 people with early stage AMD and randomly assigned to them to receive either 10 mg per day of lutein or placebo for one year.

 

Results  indicated that supplementation with 10 mg per day of lutein  reduced levels of a substance in the body called sC5b-9, a marker of systemic inflammation, compared to placebo.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

The Multifaceted Role of Curcumin in Cancer Prevention and Treatment

The Multifaceted Role of Curcumin in Cancer Prevention  and Treatment | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

A plethora of in vitro and in vivo research together with clinical trials conducted over the past few decades substantiate the potential of curcumin as an anti-cancer agent. At the molecular level, curcumin targets numerous pathways, highlighting its ability to inhibit carcinogenesis at multiple levels and thus, potentially circumventing the development of resistance. However, there is a paucity of data to explain the underlying mechanism of its activity. Clinical trials with curcumin indicate safety, tolerability, non-toxicity (even up to doses of 8000 mg/day), and efficacy. These studies provide a solid foundation for more well-controlled studies in larger cohorts as well as open avenues for future drug development. However, curcumin activity is limited by its poor bioavailability and some possible adverse effects. The development of formulations of curcumin in the form of nanoparticles, liposomes, micelles or phospholipid complexes to enhance its bioavailability and efficacy are still in its early stages. Nonetheless, curcumin has established itself as a safe and promising molecule for the prevention and therapy of not only cancer but also other inflammation-driven diseases.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis.

Association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis. | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it
Epidemiological studies evaluating the association between the intake of vitamin C and lung cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the association between them. Pertinent studies were identified by a search of PubMed, Web of Knowledge and Wan Fang Med Online through December of 2013. Random-effect model was used to combine the data for analysis. Publication bias was estimated using Begg's funnel plot and Egger's regression asymmetry test. Eighteen articles reporting 21 studies involving 8938 lung cancer cases were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled results suggested that highest vitamin C intake level versus lowest level was significantly associated with the risk of lung cancer [summary relative risk (RR) = 0.829, 95%CI = 0.734–0.937, I2 = 57.8%], especially in the United States and in prospective studies. A linear dose-response relationship was found, with the risk of lung cancer decreasing by 7% for every 100 mg/day increase in the intake of vitamin C [summary RR = 0.93, 95%CI = 0.88–0.98]. No publication bias was found. Our analysis suggested that the higher intake of vitamin C might have a protective effect against lung cancer, especially in the United States, although this conclusion needs to be confirmed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Higher intake of lycopene may lower risk of renal cell carcinoma in postmenopausal women

Higher intake of lycopene may lower risk of renal cell carcinoma in postmenopausal women | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

A higher intake by postmenopausal women of the natural antioxidant lycopene, found in foods like tomatoes, watermelon and papaya, may lower the risk of renal cell carcinoma, a type of kidney cancer.

 

A team led by Cathryn Bock, Ph.D., M.P.H., associate professor of Oncology at Wayne State University's School of Medicine, made the conclusion after analyzing data from 96,196 women nationwide and in Detroit who enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative from 1993 to 1998 and were followed through July 2013 by participating initiative sites, including Wayne State University.

 

"We were surprised to observe a protective effect of lycopene, as several previous studies in other populations did not detect a similar relationship," Bock said.

 

The results are explained in "Antioxidant micronutrients and the risk of renal cell carcinoma in the Women's Health Initiative cohort," featured in the Feb. 15 issue of Cancer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Alterations in antioxidant defense system of workers chronically exposed to arsenic, cadmium and mercury from coal flying ash.

Humans are exposed to different stress factors that are responsible for over-production of reactive oxygen species. Exposure to heavy metals is one of these factors. The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of chronic exposure to heavy metals through coal flying ash on the efficiency of antioxidative defensive mechanisms, represented by the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and ascorbic acid. Nonessential elements such as arsenic and mercury levels showed a significant increase (p > 0.001) in the power plant workers rather than in the control subjects. There were no significant differences of blood cadmium between power plant workers and control subjects. We found a significant positive correlation (p < 0.05) between BAs/SZn (r = 0.211), BAs/BSe (r = 0.287), BCd/SCu (r = 0.32) and BHg/BSe (r = 0.263) in the plant workers. Red blood cell antioxidant enzymes and plasma ascorbic acid were significantly lower in power plants workers than in the control group (p < 0.002). We can conclude that levels of mercury, arsenic and cadmium in blood, despite their concentration within the reference values, significantly affect plasma ascorbic acid concentration, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity, which are able to increase the risk of oxidative stress.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Statins stimulate atherosclerosis and heart failure.

Statins stimulate atherosclerosis and heart failure. | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

 

A new study published in Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology suggests that statins, or cholesterol lowering drugs, may have the opposite effect of their intended use.

 

Statins may cause calcification of arteries of the heart by impairing the way “power houses” of heart muscle cells, called mitochondria, work. Coenzyme Q10 is depleted, enabling free radical production, leading to oxidative stress that calcifies arteries.

 

In contrast to the current belief that cholesterol reduction with statins decreases atherosclerosis (fatty deposits in arteries), this study presents a perspective that statins may be causative in coronary artery calcification and can function as mitochondrial toxins that impair muscle function in the heart and blood vessels through the depletion of coenzyme Q10 and “heme A”, and thereby ATP generation.

 

Statins inhibit the synthesis of vitamin K2, the cofactor for matrix Gla-protein activation, which in turn protects arteries from calcification.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Efficacy of Dragon's blood cream on wound healing: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

The blood-red sap of Dragon's blood has been used in folk medicine for fractures, wounds, inflammation, gastrointestinal disorders, rheumatism, blood circulation dysfunctions, and cancer. Existing in vitro and in vivo bioactivity of this herb on different mechanisms of healing shows strong potential of this sap in wound healing. This clinical trial study was designated to evaluate the wound healing effect of Dragon's blood on human wounds. Sixty patients, between the ages of 14–65 years, who were referred to remove their skin tag, were assigned to this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial and received either Dragon's blood or a placebo cream. They were visited on the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 10th, 14th, and 20th day of the trial to check the process of healing and to measure the wound's surface. At the end of trial, there was a significant difference in the mean duration of wound healing between the two groups (p = 0.0001). The phenolic compounds and the alkaloid taspine, which exist in Dragon's-blood resin, are probably the main reasons for the wound healing property of this plant. Being natural accessible, safe, and affordable makes Dragon's blood cream, a good choice for addition to the wound healing armamentarium. Further studies on wounds with different causes and among larger populations are suggested to ensure the effectiveness and safety of Dragon's blood.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Drinking green tea before taking supplements may offer protection from toxicity.

Drinking green tea before taking supplements may offer protection from toxicity. | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

As high doses of green tea extract supplements for weight loss become more popular, potential liver toxicity becomes a concern. In the last decade, dozens of people have been diagnosed with the condition. However, drinking green tea in the weeks before taking supplements likely reduces risk, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

 

Researchers gave mice high doses of the green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). The dosage was equivalent to the amount of the polyphenol found in some dietary supplements taken by humans.

 

One group of mice was pretreated with a diet containing a low level of ECGC for two weeks prior to receiving high doses of the polyphenol. Another group was fed a diet that did not include EGCG prior to receiving the high, supplement-like doses. After three days of high doses, the scientists tested the blood of the mice to determine how their livers handled the EGCG. Pretreated mice had a 75 percent reduction in liver toxicity compared to untreated mice.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

The Food and Drug Administration Covers Up Evidence of Fraud, Fabrication, and Scientific Misconduct

The Food and Drug Administration Covers Up Evidence of Fraud, Fabrication, and Scientific Misconduct | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

Agents of the Food and Drug Administration know better than anyone else just how bad scientific misbehavior can get. Reading the FDA’s inspection files feels almost like watching a highlights reel from a Scientists Gone Wild video. It’s a seemingly endless stream of lurid vignettes—each of which catches a medical researcher in an unguarded moment, succumbing to the temptation to do things he knows he really shouldn’t be doing. Faked X-ray reports. Forged retinal scans. Phony lab tests. Secretly amputated limbs. All done in the name of science when researchers thought that nobody was watching.

 

That misconduct happens isn’t shocking. What is: When the FDA finds scientific fraud or misconduct, the agency doesn’t notify the public, the medical establishment, or even the scientific community that the results of a medical experiment are not to be trusted. On the contrary. For more than a decade, the FDA has shown a pattern of burying the details of misconduct. As a result, nobody ever finds out which data is bogus, which experiments are tainted, and which drugs might be on the market under false pretenses. The FDA has repeatedly hidden evidence of scientific fraud not just from the public, but also from its most trusted scientific advisers, even as they were deciding whether or not a new drug should be allowed on the market. Even a congressional panel investigating a case of fraud regarding a dangerous drug couldn't get forthright answers. For an agency devoted to protecting the public from bogus medical science, the FDA seems to be spending an awful lot of effort protecting the perpetrators of bogus science from the public.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Dried whole-plant Artemisia annua slows evolution of malaria drug resistance and overcomes resistance to artemisinin

Pharmaceutical monotherapies against human malaria have proven effective, although ephemeral, owing to the inevitable evolution of resistant parasites. Resistance to two or more drugs delivered in combination will evolve more slowly; hence combination therapies have become the preferred norm in the fight against malaria. At the forefront of these efforts has been the promotion of Artemisinin Combination Therapy, but despite these efforts, resistance to artemisinin has begun to emerge. In 2012, we demonstrated the efficacy of the whole plant (WP)—not a tea, not an infusion—as a malaria therapy and found it to be more effective than a comparable dose of pure artemisinin in a rodent malaria model. Here we show that WP overcomes existing resistance to pure artemisinin in the rodent malaria Plasmodium yoelii. Moreover, in a long-term artificial selection for resistance in Plasmodium chabaudi, we tested resilience of WP against drug resistance in comparison with pure artemisinin (AN). Stable resistance to WP was achieved three times more slowly than stable resistance to AN. WP treatment proved even more resilient than the double dose of AN. The resilience of WP may be attributable to the evolutionary refinement of the plant’s secondary metabolic products into a redundant, multicomponent defense system. Efficacy and resilience of WP treatment against rodent malaria provides compelling reasons to further explore the role of nonpharmaceutical forms of AN to treat human malaria.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Evidence Shows Some Sugars Are Worse Than Others; Fructose Tops the List.

Evidence Shows Some Sugars Are Worse Than Others; Fructose Tops the List. | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it

Are all sugars created equal, or are some more likely to cause obesity and related diseases, including type 2 diabetes?

 

A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2004 proposed that the growing use of high-fructose corn syrup as a sweetener in processed foods could be linked to ballooning rates of obesity. It launched a long, contentious scientific debate.

 

A recently published paper in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings won’t settle the issue, but it does pose a significant new challenge to those who believe that a sugar is a sugar is a sugar.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jonathan Middleton
Scoop.it!

Nicotinamide sensitizes human breast cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of radiation and cisplatin

Nicotinamide sensitizes human breast cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of radiation and cisplatin | A Tale of Two Medicines | Scoop.it
Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors enhance the effect of DNA alkylating agents on BRCA1‑ and BRCA2-deficient cell lines. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the PARP inhibitor nicotinamide (NAM) on breast cancer cells with different BRCA1 expression or function, such as BRCA1‑deficient MDA-MB-436 cells, low expression BRCA1 MCF-7 cells, and the BRCA1 wild‑type MDA-MB-231 cells, to demonstrate its effects as a chemo‑ or radiosensitizing agent. PARP activity was analyzed in MDA-MB-436, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells subjected or not to NAM. Inhibition of PARP by NAM in the presence of DNA damage was examined by Alexa Fluor 488 immunofluorescence. Crystal violet assays were used to test growth inhibition and the chemo‑ and radiosensitization effects of NAM were investigated using clonogenic assays. Significant differences among data sets were determined using two-tailed ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. We demonstrated that NAM reduces PARP activity in vitro, and in cells subjected or not to DNA damage, it also reduces the viability of breast cancer cell lines and synergyzes the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in MDA-MB-436 and MCF-7 cells. Downregulation of PARP1 with siRNA led to modest growth inhibition, which was further increased by cisplatin. Nicotinamide also induced radiosensitization in MDA-MB-436 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, NAM may be used as a chemo‑ or radiosensitizing agent regardless of the BRCA1 status in breast cancer.
more...
Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, January 28, 2:30 AM
Nicotinamide sensitizes human breast cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of radiation and cisplatinAuthors: G. Domínguez-Gómez J. Díaz-Chávez A. Chávez-Blanco A. Gonzalez-FierroJ. E. Jiménez-Salazar P. Damián-Matsumura L. E. Gómez-Quiroz A. Dueñas-GonzálezCorresponding author: A. Dueñas-González [

View Affiliations

Published online on: Tuesday, December 9, 2014Pages: 721-728DOI: 10.3892/or.2014.3661