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Rescooped by Lydia Liao from Has streaming music really killed the album?
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Streaming Is Killing the Music Industry. Long Live Streaming.

Streaming Is Killing the Music Industry. Long Live Streaming. | A Sound Mind | Scoop.it
Peanut butter is made from peanuts. Rhode Island is neither a road nor an island. Rick Ross has giant man titties. The Fat Guy Who Yells is both fat and yells. Music sales are down. #FactsOnly

Via Aaron Roberts
Lydia Liao's insight:

The article is on the fatalist side, based on the fact that life has is the survival of the fittest. It offers an interesting perspective to how the music industry could have evolved in another direction. Rather than blaming piracy, it suggests that the music industry could have channeled its efforts into keeping up with the changing times. An original piece that is worth the read.

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Aaron Roberts's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:38 PM

This article puts the question to the test and goes in deep and answers questions other websites and articles just touched on. On top of all of the info on this website. Everything is credited to the right place if it's not an original thought.

 

 

Rescooped by Lydia Liao from Streaming music steals money from artists
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An Artist Got 16 Bucks for a Song That Pandora Streamed a Million Times (Updated)

A million of anything is pretty much always an insanely impossible number. Winning a million dollars, having a million Twitter followers, selling a million products--anything done a million times is something to be proud of. But maybe not getting your song streamed on Pandora a million times. All you get sometimes is 16 measly dollars. Or $16.89 to be exact.

Via Myles Winright
Lydia Liao's insight:

Pandora is taking fire for not justifiably compensating performers and songwriters for their work. Accused of trying to undermine the free market, it toes the line on government rules of webcasting rates to pay songwriters and artists less than they are worth.  For instance, David Lowery's song "Low" was streamed more than a million times on Pandora. While Spotify paid $12.05 for the 100,000 times and Sirius more than a dollar per play, Pandora got away with just 16 bucks for a million plays.

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Myles Winright's curator insight, April 13, 2014 10:15 PM

In this article I learned that the government set the rates for online streaming music, so the fact that artists aren't  getting paid the right amount isn't Pandora, Spotify, or any other streaming media app's fault. An artist got a million plays but only paid $16 due to these rules. Something needs to change.

Jack Alexander's curator insight, October 12, 2014 6:28 PM

This is a very biased article, but does make an excellent point. Reaching the number of a million is next to impossible. Yet, when streamed on pandora, a million streams equals 16 dollars. That ratio alone is unfair, Spotify is in the same category as pandora and is paying more (12 dollars for every 100,000 streams). How can pandora get away with such low rates? It's really unfair to the artists and labels.

Dylan Bennett's curator insight, April 21, 3:37 PM

An artist had their song played over 1 million times on pandora and only got paid $16. This is outrageous and is basically robbing the artist of the money they deserve for making a great song

Rescooped by Lydia Liao from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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11 On-Demand Music Streaming Services Compared

11 On-Demand Music Streaming Services Compared | A Sound Mind | Scoop.it
There’s no shortage of apps to help you discover new music. Some are slaves to algorithms, some depend on human-curation, while some combine the best of both worlds. There’s been... Keep reading →

Via Thomas Faltin
Lydia Liao's insight:

Playlist curation, Streaming services and customized radio stations have changed the way that we listen and discover new music. The music industry is extremely competitive. How do you decide which service to use? This page will weigh the pros and cons of some of the top music streaming sites.

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Rescooped by Lydia Liao from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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You Tube goes into streaming music, 'just like Spotify with video'

You Tube goes into streaming music, 'just like Spotify with video' | A Sound Mind | Scoop.it

Youtube has had longstanding rumors that it will launch its own paid stream music service. While it faces fierce competition from other music streaming sites such as Pandora and Spotify, it has a clear leg up:

its music client will not be limited to songs only, but paired with videos as well.

YouTube is reportedly to launch a streaming music subscription service “akin to a Spotify but with video” by the end of the year.


Via Thomas Faltin
Lydia Liao's insight:

Youtube has had longstanding rumors that it will launch its own paid stream music service. While it faces fierce competition from other music streaming sites such as Pandora and Spotify, it has a clear leg up: its music client will not be limited to songs only, but paired with videos as well. This is a feature that none of its competitors have been able to offer.

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Rescooped by Lydia Liao from Will music streaming services save the Recording Industry
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iTunes Radio Wants To Be Your DJ And Record Store

iTunes Radio Wants To Be Your DJ And Record Store | A Sound Mind | Scoop.it
With the launch of iOS 7 today, Apple is entering the streaming music market with iTunes radio. We take a look at what it is and what role it will play in the crowded digital music world.

Via Joshua Priester
Lydia Liao's insight:

Selling music is a dying business; streaming is the future. Understanding that, Apple has finally unveiled a long-awaited service for streaming digital music. The basic idea of iTunes radio is pretty similar to that of Pandora. One can build radio stations around an artiste or song, as well tune in to genre-based stations. It gets better than that; Apple has exploited the latecomer's advantage to make the streaming of music more intuitive and easier. Let us continue to surprised by Apple!

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Joshua Priester's curator insight, November 10, 2013 10:09 AM

iTunes is a huge music streaming market and is going to the next level with everything to bring more consumers.

Rescooped by Lydia Liao from Has streaming music really killed the album?
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Daily Kos: Streaming services: not cannibalizing CD sales, not killing music

Daily Kos: Streaming services: not cannibalizing CD sales, not killing music | A Sound Mind | Scoop.it
Music streaming is the Internet version of radio, not thievery - and getting rid of it will make it harder for new artists to get exposure.

Cross posted from Pruning Shears .

Via Aaron Roberts
Lydia Liao's insight:

This article provides a rather balanced view on the debate of whether streaming services are killing music. Presenting both sides of the argument, Dally gives a sound argument of opinions. While he believes that streaming music can inevitably have a negative impact on how new artists get recognized today, he also hopes to see artists and labels getting paid their worth.

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Aaron Roberts's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:43 PM

This article is more of an opinion than stated facts or news. The writer here supports both sides of the argument. He believes that by doing away with streaming music can have negative effects on how new artists get recognized today. On the other hand, artists and labels will start to see money in their pockets again if we stop streaming.

Rescooped by Lydia Liao from COINBOARD
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Anghami Music Streaming Service Starts Accepting Bitcoin | PR Newswire

Anghami Music Streaming Service Starts Accepting Bitcoin | PR Newswire | A Sound Mind | Scoop.it

BEIRUT, March 9, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Anghami, the leading mobile music application in the Middle East and North Africa region, announced that it would accept Bitcoin for its subscription fees, therefore becoming the first music service in the world to accept the digital currency and also one of the first online businesses in the region to do so.

 


Via Coinboard
Lydia Liao's insight:

Anghami has announced that they will start accepting Bitcoin payments for subscription fees. Bitcoin is the world's largest payment processor for virtual currencies. While Bitcoin is still in its early days, the company believes that this is the future of payments. 

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Rescooped by Lydia Liao from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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15 World’s Best Free Online Music Streaming Platforms

This article shows top 15 World's best free online music streaming platforms which provide free service with high-quality music.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Lydia Liao's insight:

The music streaming market is currently the most dynamic segment in the music industry. Every company seems to want a piece of the music-subscription pie. With numerous sites screaming for your attention, this webpage lists 15 of the Internet's free online music streaming platforms for one's consideration.

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Larry Smallwood Jr.'s curator insight, April 23, 11:50 PM

This article speaks about how big music streaming has become and some of the top apps or websites that you can stream music including Spotify and Pandora.

Alexander Velazquez's curator insight, June 19, 10:01 PM

Companies are fighting for greater shares of the online music streaming industry and this articles look at the top 15 companies such as Spotify, Amazon, and SoundCloud. Pandora is also trying to push itself ahead and newcomers could be a potential threat to many people who are in the music business now because cloud technology is advancing. This article is very informative and the source is credible.

Luis Capacetti's curator insight, September 18, 5:53 PM

This article is great for people looking for new music, or new platforms for music. This was also very useful for me and made it easier to find new music. 

Rescooped by Lydia Liao from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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Mobile Music Survey: Few Pay for Streaming Apps

Mobile Music Survey: Few Pay for Streaming Apps | A Sound Mind | Scoop.it
Music streaming service Spotify recently announced increased features for its free mobile service.

Via Thomas Faltin
Lydia Liao's insight:

Streaming music apps are a dime in a dozen. Thus, it is not surprising that while music apps are common on smart phone devices, 72% do not use any paid music streaming apps. Only heavy music listeners would pay for such an option.

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Brandon Mezanazi's curator insight, July 20, 2014 6:03 PM

This goes to show that artist who are listened to via online, or apps, etc., are not making a dollar or even cents for when people are streaming.

Brandon Mezanazi's curator insight, July 20, 2014 6:28 PM

This goes to show that artist who are listened to via online, or apps, etc., are not making a dollar or even cents for when people are streaming.

Brandon Mezanazi's curator insight, July 20, 2014 6:28 PM

This goes to show that artist who are listened to via online, or apps, etc., are not making a dollar or even cents for when people are streaming.

Rescooped by Lydia Liao from Will music streaming services save the Recording Industry
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Katy Perry Streams 'Prism' Before Release | Music News | Rolling ...

Katy Perry Streams 'Prism' Before Release | Music News | Rolling ... | A Sound Mind | Scoop.it
Katy Perry is letting fans hear Prism early: the singer is streaming her new album on her website a few days ahead of the official October 22nd releas.

Via Joshua Priester
Lydia Liao's insight:

The music industry is in a state of flux. Music streaming companies are now becoming the new multi-billion dollar moguls of the industry. With the stiff competition to be heard, musicians such as Katy Perry are gradually turning to streaming services to release their music for free. The benefits are multifold: they gain exposure, increase popularity, as well as make a presence for their live performances. Giving free and easy access to one's music is one of the investment that will pay off the greatest.

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Joshua Priester's curator insight, November 9, 2013 9:38 AM

what singer Katy Perry did was a great way to increase the growth of streaming, having her music available online before the actual release date.