A Sense of the Ri...
Follow
Find tag "animals"
8.2K views | +0 today
A Sense of the Ridiculous
Just for fun but sometimes NSFW
Curated by Lesley Rodgers
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lesley Rodgers from Science News
Scoop.it!

How Crows Recognize Individual Humans, Warn Others, and Are Basically Smarter Than You

How Crows Recognize Individual Humans, Warn Others, and Are Basically Smarter Than You | A Sense of the Ridiculous | Scoop.it

This excerpt, from the great new book Gifts of the Crow: How Perception, Emotion, and Thought Allow Smart Birds to Behave Like Humans, by John M. Marzluff and Tony Angell, details an experiment in which students and faculty at the University of Washington tried to discover if crows can recognize individual humans--and what they'd do with that information. . . .


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
Tracy Young's curator insight, May 6, 2013 7:23 AM

The intelligene of crows would shock most people if we took the time to watch their behaviour

Rescooped by Lesley Rodgers from Science News
Scoop.it!

Butterflies spread in hot summers

Butterflies spread in hot summers | A Sense of the Ridiculous | Scoop.it
Once rare brown argus butterflies have been moving north due to a pattern of hot summers, say researchers.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
Denise's comment, May 25, 2012 12:14 PM
Bonsoir Olivier, j'ai vu la vidéo sur ces différentes sortes de papillons de belles couleurs, c'est de toute beauté lorsqu'ils papillonnent de fleur en fleur. Merci. La nature est belle!
Rescooped by Lesley Rodgers from Science News
Scoop.it!

Why panda sex is so complex

Why panda sex is so complex | A Sense of the Ridiculous | Scoop.it
"Will they or won't they?" has been the classic tantalizing question behind the romantic tensions between TV couples. It's the same for pandas, except there's more at stake.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lesley Rodgers from Science News
Scoop.it!

Apps for Apes: Orangutans using iPads to paint and video chat with other apes

Apps for Apes: Orangutans using iPads to paint and video chat with other apes | A Sense of the Ridiculous | Scoop.it
Orangutans across the world may soon join the ranks of millions of humans as proud owners of new iPads.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lesley Rodgers from Science News
Scoop.it!

Boiled-to-death penguins are back from the brink

Boiled-to-death penguins are back from the brink | A Sense of the Ridiculous | Scoop.it

"The boiling of millions of penguins on a remote Antarctic island triggered one of the first international wildlife campaigns. A century on, DNA analysis proves it has been a success. Now, Macquarie Island's king penguins must face rampaging rabbits."


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lesley Rodgers from Science News
Scoop.it!

Fish ‘Smell’ Danger, and Perhaps We Do Too

Fish ‘Smell’ Danger, and Perhaps We Do Too | A Sense of the Ridiculous | Scoop.it
Researchers may have solved a piece of the puzzle surrounding how fish “smell” harm.

 

When one fish is injured, others nearby may dart, freeze, huddle, swim to the bottom or leap from the water. The other fish know that their school mate has been harmed. But how?


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lesley Rodgers from Science News
Scoop.it!

Rescuing frogs, so they can rescue us

Rescuing frogs, so they can rescue us | A Sense of the Ridiculous | Scoop.it
The importance of frogs in the food chain and their surprising role in human medicine is one reason why scientists are hurrying to rescue them from a deadly fungus, and preserve them in "amphibian arks".

Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
oliviersc's comment, April 10, 2012 8:36 AM
I share it here : http://seenthis.net/messages/64749
Sakis Koukouvis's comment, April 10, 2012 8:47 AM
Thank you @oliviersc
Rescooped by Lesley Rodgers from Science News
Scoop.it!

Honeybees Self-Medicate with Anti-Fungal Resin

Honeybees Self-Medicate with Anti-Fungal Resin | A Sense of the Ridiculous | Scoop.it

"Beekeepers would love to get rid of propolis, a sticky substance made of resins that bees use to line their hives, because it makes it hard to pry hives open. But propolis isn’t just gluing the hive together, according to a new study published in PLoS ONE—honeybees use it to fight off fungal infections and seek it out when their hives are infected.

Bees invest a lot of effort in hunting down the resins that make up propolis, which they forage from plants, just as they do nectar. That means that every minute a bee is looking for resin is a minute it’s not looking for food. The trade-off is worth it, apparently, because propolis kills bacteria and fungi lurking in the colony."


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lesley Rodgers from Science News
Scoop.it!

Research reveals evolution of earliest horses was driven by climate change, global warming affected body size

Research reveals evolution of earliest horses was driven by climate change, global warming affected body size | A Sense of the Ridiculous | Scoop.it
When Sifrhippus, the earliest known horse, first appeared in the forests of North America more than 50 million years ago, it would not have been mistaken for a Clydesdale.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.