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An Inbound Marketing model for 2013 [New infographic] - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice

An Inbound Marketing model for 2013 [New infographic] - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it

t’s almost a year ago since we created our blueprint for content marketing infographic – and with so much conversation now around the converging of digital and ‘off-line’ media, the proliferation of mobile and the increasing popularity of marketers talking about paid, owned and earned media we wanted to update our blueprint for 2013.

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Top 20 Social Networks [INFOGRAPHIC]

Top 20 Social Networks [INFOGRAPHIC] | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it

This infographic from Silverpop takes a look at the major players in social media – including those lucky enough to find themselves in the 100+ million user club – and provides some key statistics and growth data for twenty different channels.

 

Full details at: http://ijustdid.org/2012/11/top-social-networks/

 


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Meet The Blogger Who's Doing Battle With A Fashion Giant

Meet The Blogger Who's Doing Battle With A Fashion Giant | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it

To continue on in the topic of blogging, a case between a blogger named Rachel Kane and the brand Forever 21 popped up once upon a time. It became a legal fight in which the 26-year-old brand manager/copyrighter was asked to take down a blog she had created, called WTForever 21. Kane often sought out Forever 21 as an easy fashion source, in which she often liked to shop. However, when she came across items that she found to be odd for the brand, she showcased those products on her blog, basically criticizing why the items were even included in Forever 21’s store. Kane said it was just a way for her to “chronicle these missteps.”

 

Kane meant for the blog to be good-natured, however, Forever 21 did not see it that way. The company then sent Kane a letter, demanding that she take down the website immediately or they would take action. The action the brand planned to take was to sue Kane for copyright infringement, since Kane was using pictures directly from the Forever 21 website. Ultimately, Kane was surprised by the letter and took it seriously, but she was mad that her blog had been up and running for quite some time before the company ever decided to say a word about it. However, Kane did not want to be pushed around, so she decided to challenge Forever 21 and took to online media outlets to share her story. She received support from her readers and the media, which ended up bringing about the issue of blogger’s rights and fair use.

 

In the end, Kane’s blog remained without any word from Forever 21 once they realized she was not partaking in copyright infringement. Kane commented that the experience ruined her view on Forever 21 as a source of trendy fashion and that she now shops there much less, mainly because of how the company reacted to her blog. She has, however, realized that she truly enjoys blogging and will continue to do so. She also encourages people to create sites where they can use their freedom of speech.

 

I think this case proves to be very interesting, and I am ultimately happy that Kane decided to challenge Forever 21. I can see how Forever 21 would react to a blog like Kane’s, but I don’t understand why they reacted so harshly. People are allowed to exercise their freedom of speech, and she was simply stating her own opinion on the company’s products that she did not like. Not everyone is going to like a company’s products, and they should be free to say what they want about the product. I think this case ended up causing “bad” PR for Forever 21, because I think most people took Kane’s side in this issue. According to Center et al., “The difficulty in trying to pin down ethics in terms of standards or principles of conduct is that there is so little uniformity. Short of what is legal or illegal, determination of what kinds of conduct are acceptable, in various kinds of circumstances, comes down to the individual or the group conscience” (pg. 306). Forever 21 clearly saw Kane’s conduct as inappropriate, and thought she was taking part in an illegal activity, which came down to the company’s group conscience.


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Seven don’ts for PR fashion: Do as they say, not as they do

Seven don’ts for PR fashion: Do as they say, not as they do | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it

To go along with the five tips for scoring an editorial spot in a major fashion magazine, I have found this useful article, also by Polina Raygorodskaya, that contains seven general tips for public relations professionals in the fashion industry. The first tip discusses avoiding mass pitching and the importance of not wasting a reporter or editor’s time. I feel this is important because you do not want to have editors on your bad side as a PR professional in the fashion industry, especially when it comes to business-to-business relations. As stated by Guth and Marsh, “Business-to-business relations in the mangement of relationships with businesses that have resources that your business needs to achieve its goals” (pg. 191). Also, you would not want people to waste your time, so respect other people’s time as well.

Raygorodskaya’s second tip is to not send untargeted pitches. I think this one goes along with the first tip about not wasting editor’s time. It’s important to do research and know what target audiences a certain fashion magazine aims towards, that way your pitch will make sense for the magazine you are pitching to and their targeted audience. A few of the other tips include responding quickly, not fibbing, and not overwriting. These all make sense and seem very important to remember as a PR professional in the fashion industry. Responding quickly is a must in almost any profession. It allows for good communication in a company or between clients, which is often the case in fashion PR. Not fibbing is another tip that is important in most professions. If you don’t know something, simply do your research. In the fashion industry, reporters and editors do research on the subject matter they’re working on, so any PR person in the industry should do their research, too.

Raygorodskaya also talks about avoiding overwriting when it comes to pitches and press releases in the fashion industry. I think this is crucial in the fact that sometimes “less is more.” It’s imperative to only send out pitches or press releases that contain important content and that are the appropriate length. The last two tips the author discusses are to not be dull and to not be negative. Both of these seem very important, in my opinion, especially in the fashion industry. Fashion is all about creativity and new ideas and is important in the evolution of the fashion world. Avoiding negativity is also crucial because it is important to maintain good relationships and it helps to keep one’s own reputation positive. All in all, Raygorodskaya’s seven tips for fashion PR prove useful and important to bear in mind for any PR professional.


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PR guru to have her own reality TV show

PR guru to have her own reality TV show | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it

A new television series on Bravo focuses on a major fashion public relations professional and her company. The series, called “Kell on Earth,” stars Kelly Cutrone, the founder of the PR firm People’s Revolution. The show gives viewers an inside look of the fashion world and Cutrone’s role in it. Cutrone has a reputation of being very intimidating, but has a high credibility in regards to fashion. The show delves into Cutrone’s life, allowing viewers a taste of what it takes to run a fashion PR company, and how to balance her work and personal life.

 

Cutrone’s work is rather time consuming and fast paced. She runs her successful company and plays a huge role in Fashion Weeks in both New York and London. With the tough economic climate and being in charge of organizing fashions shows all around the world, Cutrone’s job is no easy feat. Yet, the notable fashion PR pro still finds time for her personal life. Cutrone is a single mother to her daughter Ava, and is also working on writing her first book “If You Have To Cry, Go Outside.”

 

In the show, Kelly’s four assistants and business partners make a regular appearance. Robyn Berkley is a partner at People’s Revolution who actually lives on the fifth floor in the firm’s building. Cutrone is very fond of Berkley and refers to her lovingly as her wife or sister. Next, there is Emily Bunghert, who is another partner and a publicist. Bunghert helps guide the company towards its successes and is very assertive in her work. Stefanie Skinner was Cutrone’s former assistant, but has since received a promotion to Junior Executive, and is one of Cutrone’s most beloved employees. She struggles with balancing her work and personal life, but she is very dedicated to her job. Lastly, there is Andrew Mukamal, Cutrone’s new assistant. He has a large knowledge and love for fashion, but none really for PR. However, he still proves a valuable asset to People’s Revolution and he knows working there will help him towards his goal of becoming a fashion stylist.

 

Overall, I think this show is a great idea and will really help showcase the world of PR. People’s Revolution is a very successful and well-known company, and having a show of it could be beneficial to those thinking of going into fashion PR. It would provide a detailed look into all the work that goes into the profession. Another reason the show is a great idea is for People’s Revolution itself and for their clients. As stated by Center et al. in the chapter regarding consumer relations, “As “social networking” or “buzz marketing” continues to grow, the reputation of a company and its brands will play an even greater role in the word-of-mouth communication around products and services” (pg. 134). That being said, a television show will provide great publicity and marketing for the company, possibly bringing in more clients.


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New York Fashion Week Street Style Is Often a Billboard for Brands

New York Fashion Week Street Style Is Often a Billboard for Brands | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it

Blogging has become a huge part of the public relations world. Laura Ellner, a fashion blogger, was seen during New York Fashion Week often adorned in different designer’s clothes. Many photographers snapped shots of her and asked what all designers she was wearing. Numerous situations similar to Ellner’s occurred all around the city during Fashion Week.

 

Fashion blogging has developed into a new way for people to showcase designer’s clothes. Fashion bloggers can range from previous models, to simply anyone who has a large interest in fashion. Essentially, fashion bloggers who take to the streets wearing designer outfits basically provides free advertising for the designers. This can be extremely beneficial to newcomer designers or young designers who do not have the resources to hire powerful PR professionals or important editors. This way, these designers can lend their clothes to friends or supporters who will wear the clothes on the streets, providing the chance to be photographed and noticed by the industry and consumers.

 

Some designers feel that their clothes being featured on a fashion bloggers website, or even of the blogger wearing the clothes herself, that it is sometimes equal to or better than their clothes being on a red carpet. In fact, this tactic is now becoming a strategically planned operation, since some fashion experts say it is a new way of doing PR. Many times, a fashion blogger may, in a sense, represent a certain designer and focus on that brand’s products. The blogger may wear that brand’s clothes or accessories more often and talk about that specifically in their blog, including pictures. Also, if the blogger is out on the streets wearing that specific designers clothes or accessories, they will tell any reporters or photographers who may come up to the blogger. In some cases, designers may pay popular fashion bloggers to only blog about their products and to wear their stuff out on the streets.

 

Overall, I completely see how fashion blogging falls into the public relations world. Wearing a certain brand’s clothing out on the streets will more than likely be noticed, especially in popular fashion cities like New York City and Los Angeles. I found it interesting, however, that some designers may actually pay a specific fashion blogger to only talk about and wear their clothes for the blog. Nonetheless, fashion bloggers will almost always talk about whom they are wearing in their pictures they post on their blog. This certainly brings about the brand’s relationship with the public and potential customers, resulting in public relations. According to Center et al., “The difference is that marketing is totally engrossed in selling, whereas public relations is more holistic. It supports sales to customers, but also is concerned with relationships with all other stakeholders of the organization” (pg. 134). One fashion blog I follow every day, Cupcakes & Cashmere, features Emily Schuman, who always provides the links for what she is wearing in her posts. I definitely think it’s a good way to get a large target audience to focus on certain brands, and can ultimately bring in more customers for brands.


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Top Tweetchats for PR, Communications, and Social Media Pros | HooJobs

The #pr20chat discusses how social media is shaping and transforming the public relations industry. Topics of conversation range from engagement through new media, traditional PR tactics, industry trends, and improving ...

 

[7 tweet chats PR, comms, SM should know ~ Jeff]


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16 Examples of News Curation at Work: The Content Curation Look Book 2013

16 Examples of News Curation at Work: The Content Curation Look Book 2013 | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good, Fabrice, massimo facchinetti, Jesse Soininen, Jeff Domansky
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Pawan Deshpande's comment, January 21, 2013 9:43 AM
Robin, thank you once again for pointing out the broken link.

There's only ONE broken link of which I am aware. The creation of eBook has been a four month long process and during the course of it one of the links has gone dark. The Color Association of the United States is a perfectly valid, and captivating example of picture curation, as noted in my previous comment. Lastly,the FedEx site is a perfectly valid example of curation that has served its purpose (criticizing the bailout), and is hence no longer updated -- but is still an interesting example of curation as a marketing tool.

There's nothing "curious" going on here. One of the sites has gone dark, as you pointed out. We have since updated the eBook to denote that the site is no longer active. Thanks for sharing the link -- hope you and your readership enjoy it.
Robin Good's comment, January 21, 2013 9:57 AM
Thank you Pawan for your kind clarifications that allow me to better appreciate this good editorial work you have done.

I think this type of publication is right on the mark in serving the needs of your audience and my criticism was only directed at highlighting how important, for anyone involved in this field, me included, to pay great attention to details as the reader often does not have the time to appreciate what is not immediately evident.

Please keep up such great work as it helps the whole industry grow while educating customers with great examples.
Alfredo Corell's curator insight, January 23, 2013 3:43 PM

free download

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Most Popular Social Media in Australia

Most Popular Social Media in Australia | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it
Social media has become very popular over the decades, and these websites have millions of users. Australia ranks fourth in worldwide social media penetration. Aussies spend more time on Facebook, Youtube and other social media sites.

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Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:18 PM

Wow most popular media in Australia !!!❤️❤️

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:22 PM

Social media has evoloted over the past decades and is in fourth place for social media penetration. 

Cameron & Sam's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:08 AM

This article represents social. This article is about the popular social media websites in AustraliaAustralia

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Petraeus follows crisis PR textbook—but will it help? | PR Daily

Petraeus follows crisis PR textbook—but will it help? | PR Daily | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it
The Friday release of CIA Director Gen. David Petraeus’s resignation hit on key crisis PR points, but the story could become a runaway crisis for the administration.

 

Will the tightly controlled announcement of the Gen. David Petraeus affair and resignation become an unstoppable PR crisis for the Obama administration?

 

It’s hard to say, because the political and media world is only now getting a grasp on the scope of the story.

 

However, Petraeus has followed the crisis PR textbook, according to several public relations professionals....

 

[Useful crisis management analysis from Michael Sebastian at PR Daily. ~ Jeff]


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5 fashion PR tips for winning coverage in Vogue

5 fashion PR tips for winning coverage in Vogue | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it

In this article by Polina Raygorodskaya, attaining editorial placement in a major fashion magazine is discussed.  Five tips are laid out to help advertisers have a better chance at getting the editorial placement they desire.  Raygorodskaya’s tips include planning pitches, face-to-face meetings, product placement, circulation, and time versus money.

 

Editorial calendars are a huge part of the magazine world.  They allow advertisers to be aware of when a magazine will be writing about certain stories or doing a specific themed issue.  This provides advertisers with a basis in which to better plan their pitches, which ultimately makes editors happy.

 

Networking plays a huge role in public relations.  Raygorodskaya touches on this factor in saying that face-to-face meetings are important when trying to attain an editorial spot in a top fashion magazine.  By attending the same events as editors, advertisers have a better chance at meeting and conversing with these editors, which makes the advertiser more familiar to the editor.

 

Another tip for advertisers is for them to get their product out into the public eye.  Through use of product placement, editors are more likely to know an advertisers product before a pitch is even presented.  Product placement in certain shows or events gives advertisers a benefit when pitching to an editor.  Raygorodskaya also points out the importance of circulation in regards to where advertisers try to attain editorial placement.  Advertisers should not expect to be in every fashion magazine there is out there, but they should certainly pitch to numerous magazines in which their advertisements will reach the targeted audience.  Lastly, time versus money is always important in public relations.  Advertisers trying to attain editorial placement in a top fashion magazine most often have to spend a good amount of time to work on getting that placement.  However, if the spot is achieved, the money will make up for the time.

 

I believe that all five of these tips are important and crucial when it comes to trying to get an editorial spot in a top fashion magazine.  Networking is most definitely a huge key step for any public relations practitioner, and is a tool that I, as a public relations student, have already put a good amount of time into.  Knowing the editorial calendar also seems to be very important. According to Guth and Marsh, “Through formal and informal research methods, practitioners gather data on the client, the environment in which it operates, and its stakeholders” (pg. 3).  This quote by Guth and Marsh defines the first, simple step in any public relations process.  Research of that calendar is most certainly a huge priority for anyone seeking a pitch with an editor.

 

Broadening the circulation of top fashion magazines is also very important.  Networking can come into play here and provide advertisers or public relations practitioners with more options as to where they can obtain editorial placement.  And as always, investing a lot of time in reaching a goal will most often yield favorable results for the advertiser or practitioner, usually in the form of money.


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Glamour? Ha! The realities of entertainment and fashion PR

Glamour? Ha! The realities of entertainment and fashion PR | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it

To put it simply, jobs in the entertainment and fashion industry as a public relations practitioner are very much desired. The glamorous qualities of the highly publicized events are the reason so many people want to become a part of the industry in some way. However, many people do not realize how much work that is required in order to survive and be successful in the fashion industry.

 

Some reality shows sometimes skew the perception of fashion PR jobs, making the job look much easier than it really is. In fashion PR, there are high expectations, even for those at a junior level status. There are many realities of being in the fashion PR world, including a keen eye for attention to detail, taking pride in your work and showing it, being able to understand and abide by a strict budget, always having to act professionally at your events, and doing your best to keep calm when client demands are ridiculous. Many people who want to work in this industry have this idea that all it requires is looking good and knowing how to party in order to be successful. But that could not be farther from the truth—it requires so much more than that.

 

Long hours of wearying work are required in order to be successful as a fashion PR practitioner. Many times, fashion PR pros need to be aware that they will be expected to work long, crazy hours, and sometimes even work on the weekends. Some other tasks that entry-level PR practitioners for the fashion industry will be expected to carry out include staring at a computer screen monitoring news stories on clients, making numerous phone calls for varying reasons, booking and confirming car services and hotel reservations, conducting dozens of site inspections of venues, and stuffing hundreds to thousands of gift bags, just to name a few. However, at the end of the day, when your work is completed and leads to great results, the accomplishment and excitement you feel makes all the hard work worth it.

 

Overall, I found this to be a great article that really touches upon the importance of the work that goes into a fashion PR job and how much work the job really requires. I liked that the article provided lists of specific tasks entry-level PR practitioners would very likely be expected to perform. It even gave me a better idea of what kind of work I would be doing, since this is the sort of work I would like to get into after college. I agree that the job requires much more than just looking good and knowing how to party, simply because in this job, at least while you are working, you would not be partying, but rather doing your job and making sure everyone else is enjoying the party.

 

As a PR practitioner in this industry, you are often trying to get the media’s attention of your event. This idea made me think of media relations. According to Guth and Marsh, “As practitioners engage in the critical thinking necessary for developing effective media relations strategies, one thought should come first: In many ways, journalists are no different from any other target public” (pg. 114). I think this shows that it’s a good idea to think of the media as one of your target audiences, in order to help get the media interested in your events, further providing media coverage of the event. This article also allowed a better understanding of simple tasks that I had not really thought of before, like the idea of having a strict budget to follow. In the end, however, I still know that this is the kind of job I would like to do in the future and know that I would work very hard at it in order to become successful.


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50 Digital Media Resources You May Have Missed

50 Digital Media Resources You May Have Missed | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it
Catch up on the latest digital media resources with our weekly features roundup.

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Why Infographics Are Great for Marketing | Contently

Why Infographics Are Great for Marketing | Contently | A Public Relations Professional | Scoop.it
The mind filters out 99 percent of information, but infographics tend to stick.

 

How meta: An infographic on infographics! 

 

Neo Mammalian Studios has produced this infographic on how they are great marketing tools for businesses.

 

It’s full of fascinating facts. For example, it states that on average, a person is exposed to the equivalent of 174 newspapers filled with information daily, and that “99 percent of all sensory information is filtered out by the brain almost immediately.”

 

Infographics, apparently, help information get into that one percent that sticks.

 

According to Neo Mammalian, in a little more than two years, infographic search volumes on Google have increased by over 800 percent, and “publishers who use infographics grow in traffic an average of 12 percent more than those who don’t.”...

 

[Check note this infographic on infographics. Seriously. ~ Jeff]


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