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A perspective of our world
Giving scale and perspective the world we all live in
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Billion Euro-o-Gram

Billion Euro-o-Gram | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
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Worldmapper World Population Atlas: The countries of the world as you've never seen them before

Worldmapper World Population Atlas: The countries of the world as you've never seen them before | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
The World Population Atlas: The countries of the world as you've never seen them before...
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Arms Trade

An interactive visualization of government-authorized small arms and ammunition transfers from 1992 to 2010

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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 5:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 11:15 AM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 12:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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NASA Satellite Tracking

NASA Satellite Tracking | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

J-Track 3D Satellite Tracking is an online educational tool that maps hundreds of satellites as they orbit Earth.  One of the ironies of the space program is that it's greatest scientific advances from the space program is in observing our own planet instead of deep space.    J-Track 3-D should appear in its own window and plot the satellites in an interactive panel.   This is a great way to learn more about the remote sensing platforms that give us all the beautiful imagery of our planet.


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One Year of Clouds Covering the Earth

One Year of Clouds Covering the Earth | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
At any moment, about 60 percent of the earth is covered by clouds, which have a huge influence on the climate.
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National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 8:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.
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IfItWereMyHome.com

IfItWereMyHome.com | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

How to foster geographic empathy in the classroom discussion about development? Here's one way.  This link compares MANY countries' demographics in a very personal manner. 


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 26, 2012 6:29 PM
Globalization discussions about raising disparity within countries often overshadow the growing inequalities between countries. What qualifies as middle class in the United States can be the equivalent of an upper-class lifestyle for many nations around the world. The same can be said in comparing what the poor in America have access to in comparison to many developing countries.
Mr. Verdugo's curator insight, March 21, 2013 7:08 PM

North - South. Here we have a glance of the differences

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 5:54 AM

A great resource to compare the liveability of countries using a range of criteria. 

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BBC - Dimensions (howbigreally.com)

BBC - Dimensions (howbigreally.com) | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

This site transposed global events or features (e.g.-If the Great Wall of China were in Europe, how many countries would it go through?) and placing that event on a portion of the Earth more familiar to students to help them relate more to the magnitude of global news. 


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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


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Kim Vignale's comment, July 9, 2012 7:33 PM
In the 1900s, there were more "natural" caused illnesses but not enough medicine or technology to alleviate these diseases, hence, the greater mortality rate. Presently, medicine and technology has changed for the greater good. Many of the diseases are cured and more people living longer due to this. However, mortality caused by heart disease and cancer have increased in 2010; this is probably due to higher calorie diets and exposure to preservatives and radiation.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 4:17 PM
Looking back and comparing the 1900’s to 2010, I think it is becoming quite evident that our surrounding environment and what we consume impacts our health. Honestly what kind of cancer are you not at risk of getting today? Factors can vary from the genetically altered food we consume, radiation emitted from our cell phones or even prolonged exposure to the sun. While combating harmful pathogens and bacteria may have been a critical health concern and challenge of the early 20th century, finding remedies to an increasingly toxic environment may characterize the medical needs of the 21st century.
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:50 AM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

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xkcd: Height of universe

xkcd: Height of universe | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

The observable universe in one logarithmic page

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xkcd: Lakes and Oceans

xkcd: Lakes and Oceans | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

Lakes and Oceans at scale by xkcd

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The Scale of the Universe

The Scale of the Universe | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
Zoom from the edge of the universe to the quantum foam of spacetime and learn about everything in between.

 

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.

 

Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


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Mark V's comment, September 10, 2012 11:38 AM
I felt that this is an excellent way to understand spatial thinking which is important in many areas beyond geography.
Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 7, 2013 7:08 PM

This is a great method of teaching some of the principals behind understanding spatial analysis. An important skill in understanding the world we live in.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 4:50 AM

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.


Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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La curva del crecimiento económico mundial

La curva del crecimiento económico mundial | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

En este interesante gráfico cortesía de Gary Shilling nos permite analizar el grado de riqueza alcanzada por un país, medido por su Producto nacional bruto per capita y en cuanto años se ha alcanzado.

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Google Earth Satellites

This collection by Analytic Graphics Inc. shows real-time (updated every 30 seconds) positions of 13,000 satellites around the Earth. The positions come from a government-sponsored database which shows all satellites. You get the idea that our near-earth space is getting kind of cluttered don't you?

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A Time-Lapse Map of Every Nuclear Explosion Since 1945 - by Isao Hashimoto

Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto has created a beautiful, undeniably scary time-lapse map of the 2053 nuclear explosions which have taken place between 1945 and 1998...

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America Wins in Petrol Consumption per Day

America Wins in Petrol Consumption per Day | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
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U.S. Cities With Bigger Economies Than Entire Countries

U.S. Cities With Bigger Economies Than Entire Countries | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
How do the individual economies of U.S. cities stack up against the world? Here’s a few quiz questions that can be answered with our chart of the 50 largest U.S. metro areas.
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The Scale of the Universe 2 — Other Languages

Zoom from the edge of the universe to the quantum foam of spacetime and learn about everything in between in many different languages.
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Religion and Demographics

http://www.ted.com Hans Rosling had a question: Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others -- and how does this affect global population growth? ...

 

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous website; Check it out!  http://www.martinsaphug.com/  


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 9:26 AM
An intelligent man, to say the least. i particularly enjoyed the demonstration at the end of birth rates. I found it somewhat surprising that birth rates are not effected much by religion. I felt that typically the religions, such as those that require the couple to be married, would suffer, it being harder to have a child later on. I suppose this would be no difference if they were married early on however.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 2013 10:09 AM

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous APHG website; Check it out!

Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 13, 6:21 AM

This can be viewed in the perspective of a citizen of an LDC. In LDCs, there are religions that cause the woman to be subservient to men. A higher birth rate could be the cause. If these  small religions were to distribute and be adhered to, there could possibly be a spike in the birth rate.

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Unexpected Consequences

Unexpected Consequences | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

Climate change has numerous casualities: the melting of the Arctic Sea ice is one such environment nightmare that's a result of global warming (don't worry Texans, you can just call it a "freak heat wave" or an "inexplicable anomaly").   But like all global processes, not all places are impacted equally.  Even in an economic recession, some find fortune while the majority flounder.  Same is true with the melting of the Artic; the melting might potentially opening up the fabled Northwest Passage and create new, seasonal shipping lanes.  Who would benefit from this?  Who would suffer?  To see a short video on this, see: http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/09/melting-arctic-sea-ice-and-shipping-routes  


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This is Our Planet

The best thing about the space program is all the satellite imagery we receive to better understand our home planet. 


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Hayley Allen's comment, September 2, 2012 4:30 PM
This video was amazing because it showed the earth in a way that many people have rarely seen it. I have never seen the earth in this way and I think it is wonderful that our technology today allows us to see the world from this perspective. I hope we get to watch more videos similar to this one, during class this year.
Jennifer Keyorian's comment, September 2, 2012 6:26 PM
This video is really entertaining . You can see a lot of the lights from the cities and the mountains . The cameras they put on the satellites are amazing . Its cool to see what the world looks like from outer space with the amazing technology humans have created .
Haley Wayland's comment, September 2, 2012 9:32 PM
This video is so interesting. It really shows how advanced technology has become to be able to take a video of Earth from space. It is amazing how far we have come and how much we are capable of doing in our lifetime and beyond. It would be interesting to see how advanced technology will become over the next decades.
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Historical Earthquake Data

Historical Earthquake Data | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
This map of all the world's recorded earthquakes between 1898 and 2003 is stunning. As you might expect, it also creates a brilliant outline of the plates of the Earth's crust—especially the infamous "Ring of Fire" around the Pacific Plate.

 

The plate boundaries are amazingly vivid in this geovisualization of the all the earthquakes over  a 105 year span.  How did scientist orginally come up with the theory of plate tectonics?  How did spatial thinking and mapping play a role in that scientific endeavor?


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xkcd: Gravity Wells

xkcd: Gravity Wells | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

Solar System Gravity Wells 

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