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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

A perspective of our world
Giving scale and perspective the world we all live in
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Religion and Demographics

http://www.ted.com Hans Rosling had a question: Do some religions have a higher birth rate than others -- and how does this affect global population growth? ...

 

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous website; Check it out!  http://www.martinsaphug.com/  


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 12:26 PM
An intelligent man, to say the least. i particularly enjoyed the demonstration at the end of birth rates. I found it somewhat surprising that birth rates are not effected much by religion. I felt that typically the religions, such as those that require the couple to be married, would suffer, it being harder to have a child later on. I suppose this would be no difference if they were married early on however.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 19, 2013 1:09 PM

What are the connections between religion and demographics?  How does this impact population structure in a particular country?  I found this video from Jeff Martin's fabulous APHG website; Check it out!

Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 13, 9:21 AM

This can be viewed in the perspective of a citizen of an LDC. In LDCs, there are religions that cause the woman to be subservient to men. A higher birth rate could be the cause. If these  small religions were to distribute and be adhered to, there could possibly be a spike in the birth rate.

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40 charts that explain the world

40 charts that explain the world | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
You've seen the 40 maps that explain the world. But charts have always been better than maps.
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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.
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World Map Adjusted for Population Size

World Map Adjusted for Population Size | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
1 grid square = 1 million people


Funny how tiny Australia is on this map.

(It would be interesting to do this with Quora users.)

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A Perspective on Time | Visual.ly

A Perspective on Time | Visual.ly | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
Humans are good at a lot of things, but putting time in perspective is not one of them. It's not our fault - the span of time in human history, and ev
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Great timeline with scope: everything!

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Solar System Exploration: Multimedia: Gallery: Planetary Images: Planet Size Comparison

Solar System Exploration: Multimedia: Gallery: Planetary Images: Planet Size Comparison | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
We are NASA's Planetary Science Division. Our hardworking robots explore the planets and more on the wild frontiers of our solar system.
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A renewed classic...

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Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders

Here's what Pangea looks like mapped with modern political borders | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
Pretty wild, right? It's a map of Pangea — a supercontinent that formed roughly 300 million years ago — mapped with contemporary geopolitical borders.

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Padmanabhan Jaikumar's comment, June 5, 2013 12:57 AM
may be answers to many questions
Magnus Gustafsson's comment, June 12, 2013 2:37 AM
Tnanks! This map makes it easier to understand our world right now.
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:27 PM

My favorite part about this map has to be its unintentionaly demographich connecter (If that even makes sense) for example along the south east part of the united states their are alot of latin americans and on this map the two continents are brought closer to each other to match the cultural demogaphic. To continue this the east coast and dixie are have a massive african american population. and again the african continent is brought close to people who have ancestreal roots to it. I know that pangea is not the reason why each culture settled in its respetive area just funny how well that worked out.

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Map Projections: Contents

Map Projections: Contents | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
An introduction to map projections: table of contents
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Great resource about maps projections and map making

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BBC - Dimensions (howbigreally.com)

BBC - Dimensions (howbigreally.com) | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

This site transposed global events or features (e.g.-If the Great Wall of China were in Europe, how many countries would it go through?) and placing that event on a portion of the Earth more familiar to students to help them relate more to the magnitude of global news. 


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Tree Of Life: The History of the World, Visualized

Tree Of Life: The History of the World, Visualized | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
In this graphic by the Tree of Life web project and designer Leonard Eisenberg, we see all 3.5 billion years of life on earth evolving, not through limbs and timelines, but an elegant rainbow swirl. It’s as if our whole history is a colorful bunch of balloons, all tying back to bacteria.

As you look at the graphic, realize that time radiates outward and each kingdom’s appearance is also in chronological order from left to right. What you’ll discern then is a story of origins and mass extinctions, the way life almost bided its time through the Ice Age then hit the gas through the Cambrian Explosion. It was here when the protostomes (everything from trilobites to squids) simply went nuts, and the separation of plants vs. animals as we know them arose...

 

Visit the article to learn more about the graphic that visualizes the history of the world...


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Moon

Moon | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

Program Goal: To develop an understanding of the basic physical and environmental characteristics of the moon.

 

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Amazing view of Universe captured

Amazing view of Universe captured | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
The Hubble Space Telescope has produced one of its most extraordinary views of the Universe to date.

 

The Earth is an amazing place to study...but this makes it feel remarkably small. 

 

 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:32 AM
I like this kind of stuff, if i didn't choose geography I would probably have chosen astronomy. Everything about it interests me, there's so much that we don't know and will probably never know.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 10, 2013 11:07 AM

I thought it was funny that even though many of the published telescopically captured photos are composites of different lens and filtered shots of a single item, or area of space, that if that item or area were really to be examined, to get more of a feel for the universe as it truly is rather than how we would ordinarily see it, would be to consider it from an infinite number of perspectives.  Rather than just one perspective, as humans are limited to, the universe has many eyes.  Instead of taking many photographs from the same perspective, we could, as many modern scientists do, do in-depth scans using X-ray technology, and magnetic resonance, assessing composition, to create a full picture of all angles, zooms, and subjects of everything, in order to determine more about origins and mysteries of the universe. I would endorse that to be done on an infinite scale, complete with documentation of all spatial anomallies and occurances, such that completion of understanding could, in theory take place by crossing the gap of the notion of infinity by utilizing technology to one's advantage.  This would allow us not to waste time looking at every detail, but to have something with more processing capabilities understand it for us, and communicate that infinity in a way that we could see it.  There are dangers of using X-ray technology, and it doesn't seem like NASA really cares about (as one could hope) not harming alien life, or planting life on other worlds, etc. I would more forcibly endorse that we do not try to observe other worlds and the Universe at all, because god forbid, some alien colony finds us and sees that we are not only cuturally divided, we are a torn world, shattered in the aftermath of the destruction that comes from our selfishness and pride that has long dominated the hearts of men.  They might be disappointed, and they should be.

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Data Center Real Estate Listings - Tier I, II, III and IV Data Centers | National Data Center Practice

Data Center Real Estate Listings - Tier I, II, III and IV Data Centers | National Data Center Practice | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
Data Center Real Estate - Listing of Tier I, II, III and IV Data Centers for sale across the nation.
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Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 21, 11:34 AM

I think it's awesome to see the past mixed with the present, and realizing how our imagination adds to the "mystery" of places.  However, seeing things in context truly changes perception - how could this be brought to your students?  Fascinating.  

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 28, 11:43 AM

LA PERCEPCIÓN A TRAVÉS DE LA DISTANCIA

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 5:33 PM

By looking at these images it is apparent that heir is a clear distincition between how one may view the monument from upclose andd then when you take asep back you can really appreciate it by seeing others appreciate it as well. As an observer you can also identify the different persepectives by looking at it in a different light by either taking a step back or viewing it from a different vanage point. Knowing the history of the monument also helps with a background story in order for better appreciation of the monument and the History that goes along with it.

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40 maps that explain the world

40 maps that explain the world | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
Visualizing everything from the spread of religion to the most racially tolerant countries to the world's writing systems.
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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

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Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

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Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:33 AM

The human popluation debate will always seem to be an issue. One can almost assume that the less developed countries are going to have the highest popluation but the most problems as well. A country that is classified as less developed are most definitely going to have low incomes due to the low number of jobs available, poor human development because there isn't enough people to be taking care of each other. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Nancy Watson's curator insight, December 29, 2013 9:45 AM

Interesting comparison of cities and their urban footprints

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:41 AM

useful for both Year 8 and Year 11 Geography.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, May 20, 12:15 PM

This a conglomeration of maps that represent the physical layout and land use of some of the major cities in the world, color coded by region. 

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Population Density

Population Density | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:22 PM
I really liked this map, because it showed me how spread out we are. I actually didnt realize the world was THIS populated!
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:31 PM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

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5 Science Infographics Everyone Should See

5 Science Infographics Everyone Should See | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

The best science infographics make data digestible, accessible and visually appealing, without skimping on the relevant facts. Some are for scientists, organizing massive amounts of data in a way that’s powerfully useful; while others are designed for a lay audience, illustrating complex concepts simply, like the science behind the Higgs Boson or evolution. It’s in this latter category that science infographics are making the most obvious widespread impact.

Here are five science infographics for non-scientists that will change the way you see the world.

 


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Elsie EMC's curator insight, May 20, 2013 6:51 PM

Very interesting and easy to understand for non-sciemtists.

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How do people die? Global mortality and causes of death visualised

How do people die? Global mortality and causes of death visualised | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it
What kills people around the world - and how does it vary from place to place?
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Everybody should take a look to these data

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History of Earth in 24-hour clock

History of Earth in 24-hour clock | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

I'm not sure where this is originally from, but I found it on an intro to geology course page. What happens when midnight comes around again?

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evamrg's comment, November 8, 2012 8:48 AM
muy bueno! toma dosis de humildad humana!
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Logarithmic Maps of the Universe

This website contains figures from "Map of the Universe" e-print, by Gott, Juric et al.

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50_Years_Space_Exploration1.jpg (3861x1706 pixels)

50_Years_Space_Exploration1.jpg (3861x1706 pixels) | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

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TD-architects Infographic: Work Around the World

TD-architects Infographic: Work Around the World | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Working 9 to 5, the global workforce is generating a day-night rhythm, as if the whole world would be a city.

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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | A perspective of our world | Scoop.it

The landmass of Africa is H.U.G.E. I don't think that most people realise just HOW BIG that is. Have a look at the graphics

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evamrg's comment, November 8, 2012 8:49 AM
amazing!