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A New Society, a new education!
Direct Proposals to organize a new Education in the Knowledge Society.
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Curating People is As Important as Curating Content - Here's Why

Curating People is As Important as Curating Content - Here's Why | A New Society, a new education! | Scoop.it

This is one of those gems that I love to share. It was written by Gideon Rosenblatt in response to an earlier article written by Eli Pariser, "The Filter Bubble", which is about the way algorithms (based on our personal searches) affect the results that are returned to us, as a result, we're not seeing the whole picture.

 

"Computer algorithms aren't the only thing contributing to the 'Internet Filter Bubble."

 

**In the world of the information networker, curating content is only half the game. The other half is curating the curators.

 

**In that power to choose our connections, rests our ultimate power to reshape our information filter bubbles and radically improve our perception of reality.

 

**Who we choose to connect with in our social networks deeply affects our ability to see a diversity of information.  

 

My takeaway from this is that whereas technology may restrict the results returned to us by search engines, the other, and perhaps more important half of the equation is controlled by us!  It is well documented that we are more likely to influenced by our circle of friends and associates than by anything else that we may find (or that may find us!). 

 

By effectively curating our circles of influence, we increase the value of this ever important means of discovery and therefore of our entire online experience. 

 

**This in turn can make us far more effective and informative curators, when we widen our own circles.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/AxRrEr]


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janlgordon's comment, March 15, 2012 8:05 PM
Gideon.Rosenblatt
You made my day! I always love reading and curating your articles this was definitely no exception. Thank you for always raising the bar and making us pay attention to what's really important.
janlgordon's comment, June 17, 2012 3:53 PM
Thank you for this Robin, it's greatly appreciated. It's exciting to watch and be a part of all this change, I'm sure you agree:-)
Robin Good's comment, June 18, 2012 2:28 AM
Yes Jan... I don't know exactly what you are referring to, but this the only sure thing we have today: this is time of fast and continuous change... so I am certainly enjoying the ride.

On another note: I would humbly suggest to consider posting shorter stories, especially when you are also pointing to the original, as what I am looking for from you, is not a rehash of what's in the article - outside of a 1-3 para excerpt - but the reasons why you are recommending it. You are already doing both, but it is overwhelming for me. Too much stuff, and I haven't even seen the original yet.

I would also gently mute some of the visual noise you create by heavily formatting with asterisks, bolds and big font sizes. In my case that doesn't help much. It actually hinders my ability to rapidly scan and check whether you have something good there.

I suggest to limit greatly the formatting options you use and to highlight only what is really relevant, because when too many things are highlighted, bolded, asterisked, none has any more an effect on me. It's like a crowd screaming: who do you help? :-)
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28 Major Trends for 2012 and Beyond – Part 1

28 Major Trends for 2012 and Beyond – Part 1 | A New Society, a new education! | Scoop.it

Futurist Thomas Frey gives us some fascinating predictions for the very exciting year ahead. It's a great post with essential information to shift your thinking and get ready for 2012.

 

My intro:

 

There were so many things that I could comment on but my primary focus in 2012 is the future of content curation, the evolution and its impact on how we utilize and digest data in our business and personal lives. How will curation be perceived in 2012 and what will the monetary value be for content curation? 

 

Having said that, this is what particularly caught my attention:

 

Information Doesn’t Want to be Free– In 1984 at a Hackers Conference, Silicon Valley futurist Stuart Brand was the first to use the phrase: “Information wants to be free” in response to a point made by Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak but continued

 

“On the other hand, information wants to be expensive, because it’s so valuable.

 

**"The right information in the right place just changes your life."

 

**This set the stage for an entirely new era of free-thinking “free” advocates"

 

****My commentary: One of the reasons trusted content curators will become a very valuable asset to the information economy:

 

****"There is always a cost to “free.”

 

****While it may not extract a payment from your bank account, there is always a “time” cost involved.

 

****Without some amount of friction, the volume of information you have to sift through skyrockets and even with good search technology, your time-costs climb dramatically.

 

****The days of “free” thinking are numbered. Look for this mindset to shift over the coming years. More details here. This article is from 9/2/2011 - Two things that caught my attention....

 

**While it is true that the Internet is eliminating many of the gatekeepers, people trying to break into a field without going through gatekeepers find it far harder to gain credibility and foster a “trust” relationship with their audiences.

 

****In the end it still boils down to trust. Can I trust the person I am reading or listening to? Are they an accurate source of information? Will it be worth the time and brainpower I’m investing?

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/sreMX5]


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SXSW and The Curators Debate: The Curators and the Curated @SchneiRa

A great curated story by Guillaume De Cugis of Scoop.it who has nicely synthesized the topics discussed yesterday at SXSW with Maria Popova (BrainPickings), David Carr (the New York Times), Mia Quagliarello (Flipboard) and Noah Brier (Percolate). Moderated by Max Linsky (longform.org). See also the sketchnote at : http://blog.fueledbycoffee.com/tagged/sxswcurate


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Can Content Curators of Today Help Find Old Meanings & Lost Information?

Can Content Curators of Today Help Find Old Meanings & Lost Information? | A New Society, a new education! | Scoop.it

Amanda Bell, grammar school principle looks at content curation today and feels  barrier to entry is nonexistent and may be hampering our ability to find information that has any depth and may not be accurate. She worries that this will not be good especially for young people who are just starting out beginning to learn about the world.

 

My input:

 

I say, curation is a news delivery system for those who have already found their trusted sources and a research tool for those who have not.  We're at the beginning stages on content curation, cream always rises to the top.  I am definitely of the opinion that those who are driven to learn and understand something will delve deeper to find the truth no matter what.

 

What do you think?

 

Excerpt:

 

In an article posted by Popova about Eli Pariser's new book, The Filter Bubble: Algorithm vs Curator & the Value of Serendipity, she asks whether it is a good thing that the web filters content for us.

 

It can be argued that old media (newspapers, radio, television) have always been selective and in more recent times their reach has spread beyond a single city or country. In fact, there has been global sanitising of the media networks' news headlines owing to the immediacy of access to information (including each other's information) thanks to effective and fast new communication technologies.

 

The question here, however, is whether the role of curator is any more sophisticated in these online contexts than the old media position of editor.

 

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/opinion/in-search-of-old-meanings-and-lost-information/story-e6frg6zo-1226122648411

 


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