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Social Signals & Search

Social Signals & Search | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
There is more speculation than definitive direction on how search engine algorithms are weighing social signals in search.

 

Here's what we can learn search engines value by dissecting and interpreting search results from Google, Bing, and Yahoo.

 

Read More: http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2251187/Social-Signals-Search-Reading-the-Tea-Leaves


Via Antonino Militello
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Social Signal & Search  need  for  the  Undestanding .

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A New Paradigm of Development
Unfavorable conditions dictate a New Paradigm of Development, namely the introduction of Nanotechnology for consumers.
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Thinking, Fast and Slow: A New Way to Think About Thinking

Thinking, Fast and Slow: A New Way to Think About Thinking | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
Beneath the biases of intuition, or how your experiencing self and your remembering self shape your life.

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Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom . 
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What Makes a Leader?

What Makes a Leader? | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
It was Daniel Goleman who first brought the term “emotional intelligence” to a wide audience with his 1995 book of that name, and it was Goleman who first applied the concept to business with his 1998 HBR article, reprinted here. In his research at nearly 200 large, global companies, Goleman found that while the qualities traditionally associated with leadership—such as intelligence, toughness, determination, and vision—are required for success, they are insufficient. Truly effective leaders are also distinguished by a high degree of emotional intelligence, which includes self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill.

Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Social Skill . - */S.Y\ Find New Paradigm on Social media .

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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, February 9, 2:22 AM

Somehow, it is not only knowledge about just about everything that makes a leader, it is also about being able to make connections, emotional connections and the ability to empathise with others. Remember, Mark Antony telling the people of Rome  that 'When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept'. What made Caesar a leader of the masses was his ability to connect to the masses!

sm's curator insight, February 9, 6:53 AM

Nice article with accurate details !

Momentum Factor's curator insight, February 9, 4:59 PM

'Daniel Goleman found direct ties between emotional intelligence and measurable business results.' He outlines them here for some interesting reading. 

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Data Scientists Should Think Like Journalists

Data Scientists Should Think Like Journalists | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

It isn't about statistics and math, it is about being able to construct a narrative and use data to tell stories says D.J. Patil, data scientist in residence at venture capital firm Greylock Partners.

Data scientists should look to journalism for the skills they need, according to one of the people credited with popularizing the term.

D.J. Patil, data scientist in residence at venture capital firm Greylock Partners, speaking at last week’s Le Web conference, said the key to data science was the ability to use the data to tell stories.

“Data science is about creating narratives,” he said. “It is about creating analogies, about using complex data to tell stories.”


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/S.Y\   Nanotechnology  give  New  Philosophy    for   Science ,  and  real  Application  of  they  for  Development. 

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The Brain, Imagination, & Creativity

The Brain, Imagination, & Creativity | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

"For years, neuroscientists looked for a "creativity spot" in the brain. But now they know it's in lots of places, and certain practices can help make you think more creatively. Scientists have long wanted to understand exactly how our brain allows us to be creative. Although there is still a lot left to learn, one thing has become clear in recent years: Creativity doesn't live in one spot.

There are sites in the brain dedicated to recognizing faces, moving your left index finger and recoiling from a snake, but having original ideas is a process not a place. "There is a very high level of cooperation between different parts, different systems of the brain so that they orchestrate this process," said Antonio Damasio, a neuroscientist and director of the Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California. Damasio is leading a panel today on creativity and the brain to launch the Society for Neuroscience's annual meeting in San Diego.

There are differences, of course, between creating a painting and creating a new business strategy, writing a symphony or coming up with new ways to comfort a distraught child. But Damasio says they all share the same underpinnings. Imagination is the cornerstone of creativity. "It's pretty hard to conceive that anyone could be creative without a rich imagination," he says.

Yet imagination depends on memory. Imagining what a new piece of music might sound like requires you to play with bits of music that you carry in your head, to have an understanding of and memory for music so that you can manipulate notes to create something new.

Memory is also required to recognize when something is original, which is an essential, and particularly rewarding, part of creativity. Emotions are intimately involved in creativity, too, Damasio says. And if the creativity involves finding a new way to get the football across the field or recite a monologue, then many areas of the brain that move the muscles are activated, too. "All those are different aspects of creativity," he says.

Some people are inherently more creative than others. Very large studies have shown that people with mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder and their close relatives are more likely to be creative than the general population, says Kay Redfield Jamison, a professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who is speaking on Damasio's panel. "I'd be very reluctant to romanticize (mental illness)," she says, but "it has this very interesting relationship to creativity."

People have long sought creativity in drugs and alcohol, but there's no indication, Jamison says, that mood-altering substances can promote creativity. Some aspects of creativity can be taught or at least exercised, though. "The brain is a creativity machine. You just need to know how to manipulate your software to make it work for you," says Shelley Carson, a researcher and lecturer in psychology at Harvard University and author of Your Creative Brain.

Schools often get blamed for drumming the creativity out of kids. Sometimes that blame is deserved, Carson says, particularly in places where rote memorization is crucial to success. But sometimes kids give up on imagination themselves, around grades three to five, when they naturally become more interested in rules. The trick to keeping creativity going, she says, is helping kids see that rules and imagination are not at odds.

Creativity can be cultivated through curiosity, training and specific exercises designed to foster the imagination, says Bruce Adolphe, a composer and musician. Our schools, however, often stifle creativity instead of promoting it, he says. Adolphe is part of a panel on creativity and the brain at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting Saturday, 

When composer and musician Bruce Adolphe visits schools, he says he often tells children to start a story with an ordinary moment from their everyday lives — and then add a twist that's never happened before. They'll write about brushing their teeth, perhaps, and then a dragon will squeeze out of the toothpaste tube, with the drama taking off from there.

Testing can shut down this creative process, while engaging methods of teaching can spark it, says Adolphe, another panelist, and composer-in-residence Damasio's Brain and Creativity Institute. The more we understand about the neuroscience of creativity, the better we will be able to teach people to be more creative, Damasio says. "I think people are getting more and more aware that creativity can be strengthened, fostered and encouraged.""


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The Brain, Imagination, & Creativity.  -  

A Permanent Creativity as Index of High - Potential Talent .
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Having Power Diminishes Your Empathy For Others

Having Power Diminishes Your Empathy For Others | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

New research shows that increased power in an organization diminishes capacity for empathy.

 

Several research studies have shown that increasing power in an organization (or in any kind of relationship) tends to diminish capacity for empathy, compassion, and seeing another person’s perspective. This is especially damaging to effective leadership of people subordinate to those in power. Studies have shown that increased power diminishes activity of your “mirror neurons,” which provide the sense of connection with another person’s experience, and fuels empathy. Here’s the latest study that sheds more light on what happens. It shows the need for helping leaders develop and strengthen their capacity to connect with others’ reality and experience, which helps counter the tendency towards self-absorption in one’s own perspective, when one is in a higher-power status. 

 

Douglas LaBier, Ph.D.


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A Sense Of Fairness: Part of Human Evolution. -  The Evolution of Leader. A Permanent Creativity  give "Things of Perfection",The Real Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom/. This is New Level Knowledge.   
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The Leadership Team Evolution -- And The Scars To Prove It - Forbes

The Leadership Team Evolution -- And The Scars To Prove It - Forbes | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
The Leadership Team Evolution -- And The Scars To Prove It
Forbes
My previous two blogs focused on the importance of growing leaders from within your company, and then on what we learned from our own company's initial leadership offsite.

Via Sue Rizzello
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 The Evolution of Leader. A Permanent Creativity  give "Things of Perfection",The Real Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom/. This is New Level Knowledge.            

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Sue Rizzello's curator insight, January 23, 2014 3:21 AM

"the right person for the job can be the wrong person for the company"

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Should You Be Upgrading Your Talent?

The fact is that your company probably has individuals or teams that could drastically improve results. (How to upgrade the talent in your business?

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 A Permanent Creativity is the Best Quality for Leader with New Opportunities for Business..

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Barry Deutsch's curator insight, March 25, 2014 3:31 AM

Do you have a few key critical roles where the person in the role is not fully living up to your expectations of performance?


Are they doing a great job for 65-70-75 percent of the job, but suck at the other 25 percent?


Why do you tolerate less than stellar performance in the critical game-breaker elements of the job? This article indicates that most companies don't want to address the issue because they have no one else lined up to take over the job.


I'll contend the issue is deeper:


You don't want to spend the time to find someone new. "Better the Devil I know than the one I don't"


You hope the person will change and get better so you're playing the "let's give it another 30 days game", only it's now 2 years later.


You have no hope of finding a better a candidate. You just throw up your arms and accept the status quo because you believe it's too hard to find, select, and develop a new person.


How dysfuctional do these rationalizations and justifications sound? Why do you keep uttering them when faced with under-performers in critical roles?


Have you thought about the 1 or 2 critical roles on your team which need to be upgraded?


Barry Deutsch

Master of Hiring Accuracy

Doctor of Hiring Failure and Pain

Prognosticator of Radical Hiring Improvement

 

Learn more on our popular Hire and Retain Top Talent Blog

 

Do you have a FREE Copy of our best selling e-book on how to hire and retain top talent?

 

Learn how your success depends on the quality of the team you build and keep by joining us in our LinkedIn Discussion Group on hiring and retaining top talent

 

Join the Discussion With Me On Google Plus

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We All Can Transform Culture Through Resonant Leadership

We All Can Transform Culture Through Resonant Leadership | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
Exceptional leaders are resonant. They are attuned to people's feelings. And they support people in creating, amplifying and catalyzing positive emotions. A truly great work culture cultivates the development of resonant leaders so that people at all...

Via Anne Leong, Wise Leader™, Jaro Berce
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We All Can Transform Culture Through Resonant Leadership. -  

Transformation of Thought Leader give New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom . 
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Daniel Tremblay's curator insight, January 30, 2:16 PM

"Rather than reprimanding Fields, Mulally applauds. And then he says, "Mark, I really appreciate that clear visibility."

Then Mulally does something just as radical. He asks: Who can help Mark with this?"

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Psychologists Identify the Best Ways to Study

Psychologists Identify the Best Ways to Study | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

Scientific American

Some study techniques accelerate learning, whereas others are just a waste of time—but which ones are which? An unprecedented review maps out the best pathways to knowledge

By John Dunlosky , Katherine A. Rawson , Elizabeth J. Marsh , Mitchell J. Nathan and Daniel T. Willingham  


Sunday, August 18, 2013

 

Some study techniques accelerate learning, whereas others are just a waste of time—but which ones are which? An unprecedented review maps out the best pathways to knowledge


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The Advantages of Transformational Leadership Style

The Advantages of Transformational Leadership Style | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
The transformational leadership style draws on assorted capabilities and approaches to leadership, creating distinct advantages for the organization. A leader using this approach possesses integrity, ...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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The Advantages of Transformational Leadership Style  with New  Mindset. 

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John Michel's curator insight, May 4, 2013 10:08 AM

The transformational leadership style draws on assorted capabilities and approaches to leadership, creating distinct advantages for the organization. A leader using this approach possesses integrity, sets a good example and clearly communicates his goals to his followers. He expects the best from them. He inspires people to look beyond their own interests and focus on the interests and needs of the team. He provides stimulating work and takes the time to recognize good work and good people.

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What Great Leaders Must Love - Kevin Eikenberry on Leadership & Learning

What Great Leaders Must Love - Kevin Eikenberry on Leadership & Learning | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

Here is a list of 5 things that all leaders must care about deeply if they want to lead in transformational and powerful ways.


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New Content  from Thought  Leader.                                           

  Transformation  of  Thought Leader  give  New  Understanding &  Analytical  Wisdom .  
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Why You Need A Content Curation Tool (And How To Choose One)

Why You Need A Content Curation Tool (And How To Choose One) | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
Content curation tools are a fantastic way to stay organized, up-to-date and in-the-know. But the number of content curation tools out there can be almost as overwhelming as the amount of articles and blog posts you want to ...

Via Joyce Valenza, Dennis T OConnor, Ledcome
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The  Original  Curation  after  Transformation .

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Pam Colburn Harland's curator insight, April 2, 2014 7:27 AM

Students, teachers, and administrators need to curate content.

Felicia Morley's curator insight, April 4, 2014 11:32 AM

add your insight...

JulieLaRoche's curator insight, April 10, 2014 3:14 PM

New to content curation? Wondering if it is a good tool for you? This quick article provides brief bullet points about content aggregation and content discovery and mentions Feedly and Scoop.it as tools. Currently I am testing Scoop.it to gather, read and comment on material online.

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Employing a social media monitoring tool as an OSINT platform for Intelligence

Employing a social media monitoring tool as an OSINT platform for Intelligence | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

This whitepaper discusses how social media monitoring tools can be applied as powerful and cost effective Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) platforms; and how they can support collection and analysis of relevant and targeted information relating to counter-terrorism, criminal and political open sources. The use of such tools has wide application and benefits for a number of industries, including; Government and Defence Intelligence agencies, Law Enforcement, Commercial Risk Management companies, Private Security Companies (PMCs) and Non-Government Organisations (NGOs).


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A Social Media monitoring tool  need  for  the Understanding new Content from Thought Leader.      

Leadership's Secret is Find New Paradigm for Development .           Regards, Sergey. 

                                                               

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Brand Storytelling in a Digital World

Brand Storytelling in a Digital World | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
As digital expands into every facet of a consumer’s life, marketing strategy and brand storytelling must shift its focus to create content driven by consumer conversations and needs. So how do brands get there? How can a brand leverage the momentum of conversations consumers are already having?

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Brand Storytelling in a Digital World . - */S.Y\ 
History of Thought Leader is Storytelling of Charmer On - Line on Network.

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In a Changing World, You Need to Know Which Way the Knowledge Flows

In a Changing World, You Need to Know Which Way the Knowledge Flows | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

We create this bubble around ourselves where we reinforce the beliefs that we have, the views that we have in a world that’s rapidly changing.


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*/S.Y\ What is New Paragirm of Development on Social Media ?!

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 28, 2013 1:43 PM

You’re going to be more and more out of step with a world that has a different set of needs and a different set of opportunities. And so the way to really participate in that world successfully is to find ways to connect and participate in knowledge flows. 


Working professionally with personal knowledge management is one efficient way to avoid the filter bubble and expose yourself to knowledge flows and diverse communities. 

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The Social Media Question That Small Business Owners Should Be Asking

If you're still wondering whether social media is important for your business, think of this: Facebook has facilitated more than 2 billion connections between small businesses and consumers. Instead of wondering "Do I need to be on social media?" start asking "How can I use social media to help me and my business?" For small business owners that are already pressed for time it can be hard to make social media a priority, but in today's digital age, you need to meet customers where they are. You don't want to ignore a study conducted by Market Force, which found that 78 percent of U.S. consumers' purchasing decisions are impacted by posts made by businesses they follow on social media.



The thought of finding time to frequently write and post impactful status updates may seem overwhelming at first, but maintaining a social media presence doesn't need to be time consuming. Here are some guidelines on how to get started and efficiently integrate social media into your day so that it becomes a natural part of your routine.

1. Establish your social media presence. Prioritize the social media channels that make the most sense for your business. The best places to start for many small businesses are Facebook and Google+. Once you have the basic details about your business on your page, you should aim to post every couple of days to keep your audience engaged and your page fresh.

2. Figure out an editorial approach. Develop a calendar that covers what you would like to post on specific days for the next few months. This takes a lot of pressure off because you don't need to come up with new ideas every day.

As a small business owner, you have an advantage over marketing professionals at big companies because you are interacting personally with your customers every day. Trust your instincts about what will resonate with them and start sharing. Here are some initial suggestions on content to post that will help build your credibility:

a. Photos and videos. Share images of your work, employees or office. It gives you an opportunity to show projects you're proud of and makes your page more rich and engaging. Simply add a quick caption that describes the image and hit post. Start with pictures you already have. Remember to also take snapshots of completed jobs and happy customers as new work comes along. For businesses in certain fields like healthcare, make sure you have the appropriate permission to use client photos. You can upload those pictures from your smartphone immediately onto social media.

b. Relevant news stories. Finding articles that are relevant and potentially of interest to your followers saves time and positions you as a thought leader. Most news sites have share buttons on the top or bottom of the page. Next time you're reading an article relevant to your area of expertise, click the share button to send it to all of your followers. To engage more deeply with your customers, add a status update sharing your opinion about the story.

c. Customer reviews. According to a study conducted by Ipsos Open Thinking Exchange (OTX) in 2012, 78% of consumers use online reviews to make buying decisions, so you should use social media to amplify positive feedback about your business. Post status updates linking to the positive reviews your customers have posted on other websites. You can also ask happy customers to go directly to Facebook and Google+ to review your business.

3. Set up alerts. Real-time alerts are great reminders to interact with your customers on social media. Turn on push notifications on your smart phone so that you can manage your social media pages on the run. You will then know when someone posts on your page and can respond immediately, eliminating the need to worry about it later on.

4. Consider software solutions. Explore technology that makes it even easier to manage your social media and increase its impact. Online marketing platforms can help you manage your content schedule and automatically distribute reviews, photos and status updates across social media channels. This will make sure that everything you're putting out about your business is consistent, which is an important part of building a brand that will keep customers coming back.

Keep in mind with everything you do that the purpose of social media is to share authentically. Your followers will relate to honesty. They want to see your personality through real comments and images. Don't feel like you have to create a voice to impress your customers. Treat social media as an extension of your business, and interact with your online followers the same way you talk to clients in-person. Soon you'll have a happy social community that will be more likely to think of your business the next time they need the services you provide.

Court Cunningham is the CEO of Yodle, a leader in local online marketing that helps its 50,000+ local business clients find and keep their customers simply and profitably. For additional tips on local online marketing, visit www.yodleinsights.com.


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Keep in mind with everything you do that the purpose of social media is to share authentically. Your followers will relate to honesty. They want to see your personality through real comments and images. Don't feel like you have to create a voice to impress your customers. Treat social media as an extension of your business, and interact with your online followers the same way you talk to clients in-person. -   Smart  Content.  -  

POSITIVE SOCIAL INTERACTIONS give the Growth of Your Social Media. A Permanent Creativity born Real Interest & New Connections of Users in Network.
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The Fifth Estate: Portrait of a genius as a bit of a jerk

The Fifth Estate: Portrait of a genius as a bit of a jerk | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

It’s hard to imagine a movie nipping at the heels of history more closely than The Fifth Estate, which opens the Toronto International Film Festival on Sept. 5. Just weeks after Bradley Manning (now Chelsea Manning) was slapped with his prison sentence for unleashing military secrets, and as explosive new leaks from Edward Snowden still ricochet through the media, the man who opened the gates for a world of whistle-blowers now makes his entrance as the charismatic anti-hero of a major studio picture.

But WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange won’t be crashing the red carpet at TIFF. Still in asylum at London’s Ecuadorian embassy, avoiding extradition on allegations of sexual assault from Sweden, he’s also a sworn enemy of the film. After seeing the trailer and an early, leaked draft of the script, he’s condemned it as “a massive propaganda attack on WikiLeaks.” But The Fifth Estate’s Oscar-winning director, Bill Condon (Kinsey, Dreamgirls), expects nothing less from the man he has depicted as a megalomaniac. “He’s clever,” says Condon, on the phone from New York. “He conflates anything that might be critical of him as an attack on WikiLeaks. But he may be surprised at how even-handed a portrait it is. Nobody set out to make some kind of hit job. We want to understand what makes him tick. I came to admire him in many ways.”

 

The Fifth Estate, which opens commercially on Oct. 18, does for Assange what The Social Network did for Facebook mogul Mark Zuckerberg. It portrays him as a visionary who is pathologically insensitive, a genius with a cruel wit whose single-minded ambition leads him to betray his partners and his sources. Just as Zuckerberg was cast as a pioneer of social media who is devoid of social skills, Assange comes across as a populist crusader with an allergy to actual people. As he admits with a smirk in the film, “I’ve heard people say I dangle on the autistic spectrum.”

With a thatch of white hair, and the bottled-up energy of an albino time bomb, Assange is played by Benedict Cumberbatch. He’s the intense British actor whose air of otherworldly intellect has fuelled roles ranging from Sherlock Holmes to the villain in the latest Star Trek movie. (Suddenly ubiquitous, Cumberbatch also stars in two other Oscar-pedigree movies premiering at TIFF—12 Years a Slave andAugust: Osage County.) “He’s able to play the most complicated emotions,” says Condon. “And there’s something about Benedict and Julian that does intersect. First of all, [Benedict] is crazy smart. There’s a really extraordinary intelligence that’s difficult to fake. Even physically . . . ” Then Condon trails off, perhaps loath to talk about the fact that Cumberbatch’s face is, well, as unusual as his name. Finally, he adds, “There are things about Assange that are initially strange and off-putting. Benedict can capture those, then convey just so many layers of what’s going on underneath.”

The drama pivots on Assange’s fractious relationship with his ex-colleague Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Brühl), whose book, Inside WikiLeaks: My Time with Julian Assange at the World’s Most Dangerous Website, informed the script along with another book by two British journalists. Engineered as a propulsive thriller, the story is driven by the mystery of Assange’s past. He’s depicted as a kind of revolutionary cult leader, haunted by a childhood stint in a New Age sect that had all the kids dye their hair blond. As one character notes, “only someone so obsessed with his own secrets could have come up with a way of exposing everyone else’s.” So is Assange hero or villain? Both, says Condon. “The whole idea of the movie is to lay out that question, to grapple with those issues of transparency versus privacy in the brave new world of citizen journalism. Ideally you’ll change your mind about the issues many times as you watch it.”

It seems Assange’s mind is already made up. But in a final twist of its mirror-ball narrative, the film anticipates his response in a coda that has him addressing the camera with wry incredulity. “A WikiLeaks movie?” Cumberbatch’s Assange asks. He then notes that the audience will have to “look beyond this story, any story” to find the truth. Just don’t expect Assange himself to be leaking it any time soon.

Note to readers: This article has been updated since publication to reflect that Assange faces allegations — not charges — of sexual assault.


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The Evolution of the Web

The Evolution of the Web | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

Not too long ago, when the web was young and just hitting mass adoption, we were all astounded at the ability to have information at our fingertips, shifting forever the way we live and work.

The 90s featured an emphasis on community and connecting, and a fascination with how social media is transforming the way people think, communicate and act. As we look into what’s next with today’s web, we see how communities are gathering not just to connect and find each other, but also to find power in their shared voice, raising the bar for what companies will deliver, and the type of service they will receive.

These high-level shifts are happening in record time, and leaders and companies are striving to keep up with the trend, much less make predictions on how to better serve a much more empowered, more demanding customer base with high expectations for customized solutions.

We have compiled a summary of the megatrends impacting the evolution of the web, from Web 1.0 of the 1980-90+ (Mass Adoption of the Web) to Web 2.0 1990s-2010+ (Communities Rule) to Web 3.0 (Communities Raise the Bar), in the hopes that insights from this article will help drive the planning, strategy and execution for these leaders.

1. Technology Evolution: Computer Hardware, Software, Network and Devices

Y2K scare spawned a massive investment in IT, and much of the monies were devoted to the acquisition of new equipment – hardware and software, and new ways of communicating, the internet. With Web 1.0, graphics became sophisticated and complex; databases drove interactive solutions; advances in network, computer and server hardware and software and security drove mass adoption and international expansion.

With Web 2.0, software emphasis was more on groups, membership, segmentation and engagement of users. The emergence of smart phones and tablets and an abundance of apps facilitated the expansion and advancement of social media solutions, and the massive response of the millennial generation in particular shifted forever how we connect and communicate, how we think about expressing ourselves.

As we anticipate the rise of Web 3.0, we will see the evolution of wireless, sensors, geophysical and augmented reality solutions, along with the increased sophistication and integration of devices, databases and software. Together, this will allow companies to process unprecedented volumes of information, including video technology, creating actionable dashboards, with the focus on providing personalized services, leveraging aggregated data, and ultimately better serving the needs of the customer.

2. The Role of Marketing: From Getting a Web Presence to the Rise of Community to Forecasting Needs

The self-service nature of Web 1.0 enabled customers to quickly find information and compare it with other offerings, and even get better tech support about their solution. This is a distinct difference from an age where customers and prospects waited for information to be delivered to them.

Information and automation was the focus, and getting everyone within a corporation to collaboratively update and upload accurate information was no easy task. It changed the mindset of corporate employees at all levels, and also the expectations of customers – companies did not look professional unless the web site looked that way.

With Web 2.0, it was a given that companies would have a web presence. Internal marketing departments focused the integrity of the brand, the alignment of the message, and the technical and process hurdles of getting all the information out there, to the right audiences. Independent communities and those sanctioned and supported by companies began to emerge, and began to increasingly impact the adoption curve of products and services. Managing the messages around product and service options became a challenge and an opportunity for companies.

With the emergence of Web 3.0, online communities continue to impact whether a product is adopted or panned as well as which features and products are most desirable now and in the future. But with this next phase, Marketing will leverage the community data and begin to interpret the immediate and ongoing needs of the community, and works with internal departments to deliver to those needs.

3. The Access of Control: From Corporate Leaders to Empowered Communities

With Web 1.0, Corporate leaders dictated web communication strategy and timing. The company webmaster and IT department and marketing and other execs decided whether information is up and what information is put up.

With Web 2.0, IT works with marketing to create interactive communities (or not) and Marketing works with active users and other stakeholders for input and feedback.

With the emergence of Web 3.0, Self-managed communities are increasingly working independently of companies to make purchase recommendations, and corporate execs are scrambling to work with these communities to manage brands and messages and get the right information to the right people. Authentic and proactive communication will support any necessary damage control measures and the goodwill of these powerful stakeholder communities.

4. The Quest for Content, Including Managing Spam: Sifting the Wheat from the Chaff

With Web 1.0, there was little spam, as content is driven and approved by corporate contacts. But, with Web 2.0, content is created by a partnership of company and community and the messages of community members sometimes needed to be managed by the company. Filtering out quality content and leaders was sometimes a challenge. As Web 3.0 emerges, Company-approved ambassadors and influencers partner with companies to provide quality content, mostly unbiased, to growing communities, and Spam gets more anticipated and managed as these trusted ambassadors and influencers are valued, and spammers are increasingly shunned and sanctioned.

5. The Proliferation of Devices: From PCs to Smart Phones and Tablets to TV-Mobile-Computer Integration

Web 1.0 was marked by the mass adoption of the personal computer, even for those not in technology. It also included updated servers and software and security and network access which would support users having multiple computers. Web 2.0 saw the mass adoption of smart phones and tablets, and the obsession with always being online, playing apps, connecting with communities. This mass adoption and rapid advancements in device technology and integration will lead to the integration of TV, laptop, tablets, mobile, a Web 3.0 emerging trait.

6. Security Challenges: The Direct Correlation Between Expansion and Security Challenges

It was easy when Security and IT issues are managed by companies in Web 1.0. There weren’t that many security issues, viruses were existent, but only a problem for those too lax. And with Web 2.0, companies managed the security of communities they create or sponsor and independent vendors managed the security for independent communities. With the rapid adoption of computers and devices, network and software security issues increasingly became a problem, but there were also a host of solutions. As we emerge into Web 3.0, proactive security measures will be implemented, but need to be continually updated as hackers and others get more creative and resourceful.

7. Performance Hurdles: Keeping Up with Insatiable Demand

The performance hurdles of Web 1.0 were generally solved by updating equipment: corporations updating IT, network and software and users updating and purchasing computers and internet access plans. With Web 2.0, the volumes of users and variable usage, IT and performance needs to be proactively managed by corporate team and independent vendors and again, users had to upgrade their equipment – namely adopting smart phones and increased data plans. As we evolve into Web 3.0, Data will become increasingly overwhelming, especially with the rise of video and the dynamic updating and customization of data. Users need better devices and contracts to get full service and access and corporations need to have the hardware, software and bandwidth to deliver what the customers want, and the leadership to proactively manage and anticipate the messaging to the user, and serve the needs of the user and community, as they define it.

8. Serving the Customer: The Evolving Expectations of the Customer

In Web 1.0, corporations needed to have the hardware, software and bandwidth to deliver what the customers want, which was not easy, particularly for companies not in the technology space. Leaders learned to proactively manage and anticipate the messaging to the user, and serve the needs of the user and community, as they define it. They got more sophisticated about it with the rise of Web 2.0, when it was so much about eyeballs, communities, and the rapid spread of messages-that-needed-to-be-managed, sometimes community takes off, serving the needs of the members, independent what companies want their community to hear. With the emergence of Web 3.0, there is more content and larger communities serving more people, who range in their level of participation and involvement. The content and the community help members define ongoing needs and find offerings that meet their needs, raising the expectations of all customers, and therefore, the deliverables of the companies that serve them.

9. Delivery to the Door: As the Volume of Sales Increase, Operational Challenges also Grow

With Web 1.0, eCommerce solutions were brought online, increasing sales of some companies, and putting other brick-and-mortar companies out of business. Products got delivered using standard delivery methods, as customers and companies slowly adopted the eCommerce way, and delivery vendors adapt to the new ways of customers. With the communities of Web 2.0 there were more users and prospects and additional vetting of products and recommendations, generating confidence in purchase decisions, and an increase in ecommerce success stories. ‘The ‘Dell Way’ was embraced by some companies who have quantities of standard materials, preparing for custom-built solutions on demand. Standard delivery options become more efficient, serving more customers. With Web 3.0, we are anticipating an increased volume of eCommerce sales and it becomes important to efficiently deliver to that last mile – Think ‘The Dell Way’ and map with supply chain innovations to optimally deliver personalized solutions. New delivery methods leveraging standard delivery options, software-company-turned delivery-company options (like Amazon and Google) and entrepreneurial options will emerge and grow.

10. Shift in Focus and Profits

With Web 1.0, Retail goes online, E-mail and web get integrated, Messages are easily communicated and updated, and the focus is on getting the information right, and getting it out there, easily available. Money comes from Volume sales of standard offerings, new business generation as information gets to the masses cheaply, and more repeat business/better upsell, although with the expense of conversion of data, upgrades of equipment and staff, etc., profits are marginal for most companies as a result.

With Web 2.0 and the rising influence of communities and their impact on product and service offerings as well as corporate brand, the focus is on ‘eyeballs’ and advertising dollars, not necessarily on revenues.

With Web 3.0, user analytics on  products/ services/features, will continue to guide company strategy as they better understand the aggregated community/user needs. The focus is on profits based on better serving the needs of the customer and revenues will come from better serving immediate needs of customers and even anticipate upcoming needs and trends.

What are your predictions on what will happen with Web 3.0 and beyond? E-mail us at info@fountainblue.biz with your thoughts.


Via Linda Holroyd, Edward Chenard
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Find  New  Paradigm  for  Development   and  Create  Original  Content for Consumers .  This  is  New  Evolution  on  the Web.

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Linda Holroyd's curator insight, January 28, 2014 4:37 PM

How has your life and business changed with the evolution of the web?

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Is Raw Talent necessary for success?

Is Raw Talent necessary for success? | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
Matt Maloney: Turning Raw Talent into Industry Leaders
Wall Street Journal (blog)
MATT MALONEY: Although it sounds cliché, the saying “hiring great people is the key to success” couldn't be more accurate.

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 The Evolution of Leader. A Permanent Creativity  give "Things of Perfection",The Real Application of They born Smart Transformation / New Understanding & Analytical Wisdom/. This is New Level Knowledge.                                                                   

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Barry Deutsch's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:14 PM

I agree with a couple of points Matt Maloney makes in his articles.


1. It takes tremendous discipline, focus, and most importantly, patience to hire great talent. As we've documented in our landmark research on hiring mistakes, the top three hiring mistakes all relate to not investing enough time in the hiring process.


2. Cultural Fit - both making sure the personality syncs up with the hiring manager and the team. One of the greatest mistakes in hiring is to assume the "persona" exhibited in the interview is real personality - nothing could be further from the truth.


3. Raw Talent - here's where I disagree. I think success comes from a blend of prior success and future potential. Basing the vast majority of your decision to hire on raw talent (little proven work experience and accomplishments) yields very high risk hires just as focusing too much on past experience and accomplishments yields candidates lacking in future potential.


It's not about talent or experience, but rather what's the right blend for  role, the company, and the candidate. This is radically different from "hiring the best" - it's about hiring the best for that specific role - both now and into the short range future (12-18 months).


HIRE AND RETAIN

 

 

Barry Deutsch

Master of Hiring Accuracy

Doctor of Hiring Failure and Pain

Prognosticator of Radical Hiring Improvement

 

Learn more on our popular Hire and Retain Top Talent Blog

 

Do you have a FREE Copy of our best selling e-book on how to hire and retain top talent?

 

Learn how your success depends on the quality of the team you build and keep by joining us in our LinkedIn Discussion Group on hiring and retaining top talent

 

Join the Discussion With Me On Google Plus

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5 TED Talks for Encouragement and Motivation - Huffington Post

5 TED Talks for Encouragement and Motivation - Huffington Post | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
I decided to take a couple days to revisit hobbies I love (because there are more kinds of love than just the romantic kind), like blogging on a more consistent basis than I have for the past six months.

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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, February 16, 8:45 AM

Some really good information to consider here...

Dixie Binford's curator insight, February 20, 9:21 AM

TED Talks always motivate me.  Have you watched one lately?

Erica Dinese Wyatt's curator insight, February 24, 6:12 PM

5 Ted Talks for Encouragement and Motivation

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Leadership By Virtue: Leadership and Trust | Jaro Berce

Leadership By Virtue: Leadership and Trust | Jaro Berce | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

A blog about Leadership by Virtue evolving from Martial arts philosophy to enable the art of Leadership to rise above ‘cultural background noise...

 

People are more inclined to trust those who are consistent in their behavior. In the past the greatest leaders in the world were genuinely trustworthy. But today company leaders are challenged between informing their employees of the entire truth and holding back certain realities so as not to unnecessarily scare people or lose top-talent. When leaders are not grateful for one’s performance efforts – and are always attempting to squeeze out of employees last drop of effort – it is difficult to trust such a leader. Employees desire to know what is expected of them and be given the opportunity to reinvent themselves, rather than be told they are not qualified for new roles and responsibilities and can no longer execute their functions successfully. When leaders lack the courage to enable their full potential and that of others, it becomes a challenge to trust leader’s judgment, decision and overall capabilities...

 

Read more at: http://linkis.com/blogspot.com/xf0SI


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The Evolution of Thought Leader, after Transformation.

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Mindsets and Building Culture

Mindsets and Building Culture | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

Mindsets (beliefs about talent, abilities, and capabilities) impact performance: An interview with Stanford professor and researcher Carol Dweck, whose research indicatest that "people have different beliefs about their talents and abilities."

 

Fixed Mindset

 

Those who hold a “fixed mindset” believe that their talents and abilities are fixed traits; you have only a certain amount and that’s that. This is a mindset that turns people away from risks or challenges that may reveal deficiencies and, in this way, can work against innovation and growth.

 

- Innovation - Employees and leaders with a fixed mindset are less likely to innovate. Research shows that the prime characteristic of managers who have break-out ideas or products is a growth mindset.

 

 

Growth Mindset

 

But other people hold a “growth mindset”: They believe that their talents and abilities can be developed over time through learning, dedication and mentorship. They don’t necessarily believe that everyone’s the same or that anyone can be anything, but they believe that everyone can grow their abilities. This is a mindset that leads people to stretch out of their comfort zone to try new things. They are less interested in proving how smart they are than in getting smarter.

 

- Mindset and Work Environments - Research shows that growth-mindset managers:

 

1. Create better work environments.

 

2. They are more open to feedback from employees (because they’re interesting in learning);

 

3. They are better mentors (because they believe in development); and

 

4. They are perceived by their workers as more fair (because they believe everyone has the capacity to improve).

 

Mindset and Leadership

 

Because those with a growth-mindset seek opportunities to learn and grow, those with a growth-mindset acquire the skills for success.

 

- Negotiators - For example, research shows that those who believe that negotiators are made (a growth mindset) become better negotiators than those who believe good negotiators are born (a fixed mindset).

 

 Finally, growth-mindset work teams accomplish more. Research shows that teams whose members have a growth mindset set higher standards, keep pushing the envelope, work together better and outperform teams whose members have a fixed mindset.

 

Mindset and Outcomes

 

Growth-mindset work teams accomplish more.

 

- Research shows that teams whose members have a growth mindset:

 

1. set higher standards

 

2. keep pushing the envelope

 

3. work together better

 

4. outperform teams whose members have a fixed mindset.

 

Mindset and Culture Creators

 

Fixed-mindset leaders seek personal glory. Challenges, criticism, and the success of others are all viewed as "threatening."

 

Growth-mindset leaders want to maximize everyone’s contributions over time, and therefore create a culture of growth that includes everyone. They see obstacles and challenges to be overcome, criticism as feedback and opportunities to learn, and they view the success of others as inspiration.

 

No Failure, Only Feedback

 

The focus must be on getting better--continuous, incremental improvement. In a growth-mindset culture, mistakes are expected and accepted as opportunities to learn and grow.

 

Finding Solutions, Not Knowing the Answers

 

In a growth-mindset organization everyone is "expected to be learners and collaborators, not the people with all the answers."

 

Signs of a Fixed-Mindset Organization

 

1. emphasis on sheer talent

 

2. categorizing and labeling employees by ability

 

3. constantly telling themselves (and you) that they are the elite,

 

4. emphasis on pedigree

 

5. lack of respect for many employees

 

6. an atmosphere of competition vs. collaboration within the company.

 

Signs of a Growth-Mindset Organization

 

1. emphasis on development (mentorships, programs for encouraging growth across the company)

 

2. a concern for all employees’ progress

 

3. respect for everyone’s contribution

 

4. teamwork and collaboration

 

 

 

 

 


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Mindsets and Building Culture .                                                                 Real Influence is Level of The Changing Mindset.   

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Heather Kauffman's curator insight, September 6, 2014 11:28 AM

proving your smart vs getting smarter....what's your mindset?

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How to Cultivate High-Potential Talent

How to Cultivate High-Potential Talent | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
Companies that hire CFOs and treasurers via external searches are missing out on the opportunity to develop future executives with exactly the right skill set.

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A Permanent  Creativity  as  Index  of  Hight - Potential Talent.

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Performance analysis should be at the heart of what we do - Training Journal

Performance analysis should be at the heart of what we do - Training Journal | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it
Performance analysis should be at the heart of what we do
Training Journal
Does Instructional Design have a future?

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Performance analysis  from Thought Leader.  

Leadership is Capacity of Decoding the existent Reality .

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More on Liberal vs Conservative Brains

More on Liberal vs Conservative Brains | A New Paradigm of Development | Scoop.it

Another study from the University of Nebraska found that liberals and conservatives had different reactions to "gaze cues" — whether they tended to look in the same direction as a face on their computer screen. Liberals were more likely than conservatives to follow another person's gaze, suggesting that people who lean right value autonomy more; alternative explanations suggest that liberals might be more empathetic, or that conservatives are less trusting of others.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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How grow  with New Mindset for Development .

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