Cole Hollis' A Midsummer Nights Dream
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The Story of Theseus

The Story of Theseus | Cole Hollis' A Midsummer Nights Dream | Scoop.it
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Cole Hollis 's insight:

HISTORICAL ARTICLE: Theseus is an extremely important character when it comes to the vast conflicts posed in Shakespeares A Midsummer Night's Dream. His character is brought at the beginning of the play as the king of Athens and future husband to Hippolyta, who is also a link to ancient Greek culture. Theseus is know in popular Greek culture as the hero of Athens. Ironically this play takes place in the city of Athens, which was not an accident on Shakespeares part. Shakespeares bows to ancient Greek cultures show an entirely different layer to the story.  

 

"Theseus." Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition (2011): 1. Literary Reference Center. Web. 3 Feb. 2013.

 

http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=39035920&site=ehost-live

 

 

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clangton16's comment, March 10, 2014 8:33 AM
I thought that this was an interesting source that helps with the understanding of theseus
Stuart Daniels's comment, March 11, 2014 6:28 AM
I agree with Connor, you did a great job during your presentation of explaining the background and history behind the character of Theseus. Your presentation assisted me in learning more about what Shakespeare may have taken from legend and mythology for characters such as Theseus and Hippolyta.
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The Beautiful Globe Theater

The Beautiful Globe Theater | Cole Hollis' A Midsummer Nights Dream | Scoop.it
Cole Hollis 's insight:

PICTURE: The Globe Theater is a marvel in itself with its rich history and its historical significance. The picture above shows one of Shakespears plays being performed inside the wondrous theater. This theater as a whole shows a clear history of the Elizibethan era and its affect on the arts, music, and people. We can bow our heads in a seance to the theater in the way that it created a social place where the rich and poor alike could come to watch the arts be preformed. 

 

Green, Tom. The Globe. 2011. athena.com. Web. 23 Feb. 2014 

 

http://www.athenalearning.com/programs/playing-shakespeare/interactive-globe-theatre

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Collin Byrne A Midsummer Night's Dream 's comment, March 7, 2014 9:30 AM
I like how you mentioned the different social classes. It shows what it was like in the Elizibethan era and what art, and music was like. Great presenation overall... thanks
clangton16's comment, March 10, 2014 8:34 AM
With talking about social status in seating where would Queen Elizabeth sit?
Tyler "Fry-Dog" Freiberger's comment, March 11, 2014 8:32 AM
Did the higher class individuals such as Queen Elizabeth sometimes get in for free into these shows, because they of their great importance at the time?
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Cupid's affect on A Midsummer Nights Dream

Cupid's affect on A Midsummer Nights Dream | Cole Hollis' A Midsummer Nights Dream | Scoop.it
Cole Hollis 's insight:

SOURCE ARTICLE: The legends of Cupid and his affect on the hearts of the human race have  most definately penatrated Shakespeares A Midsummer Night's Dream. Cupids control of love is shown when Oberon sends Puck to use a magical flower to influence a feeling of love. This flower was shot by one of Cupid's love poisoned arrows which gives the flower its magical powers. When the flower is used it creates chaos between all four lovers in the novel (Hermia, Lysander, Helena, Demetrius). The flower causes both Demetrius and Lysander to fall in love with Helena, leaving Hermia unloved and depressed. Cupid and his many effects on emotion are an important part to A Midsummer Night's Dream.

 

Peabody, Josephine Reston. "Cupid And Psyche." Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew. 27-29. n.p.: Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation, 2006. Literary Reference Center. Web. 3 Feb. 2014.

 

http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=290d59df-1cbe-4271-8b6b-6487102aaf9a%40sessionmgr4002&vid=2&hid=4114



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Cole Hollis 's comment, March 9, 2014 9:05 PM
Do you think that Shakespeare had to use Cupid to maybe show that love does not spread naturally through people and Cupid needed to "poison" the magic flowers to cause false love between two people?
Allison Horn's comment, March 10, 2014 4:15 PM
It makes sense that Shakespeare used Cupid to show how the love was unnaturally spread because when I think of Cupid I think of someone shooting arrows and forcing love upon a person.
Collin Byrne A Midsummer Night's Dream 's comment, March 11, 2014 8:29 AM
Do you think Cupids role in The Midsummer Night's dream was maily a possitive imopacts or a negative impact?
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Literary Criticism- Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream

Literary Criticism- Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Cole Hollis' A Midsummer Nights Dream | Scoop.it
Cole Hollis 's insight:

LITERARY CRITICISM: It is questioned within the criticism Puck's role as a trickster. It's noticed that his actions only sometimes, match those of a trickster. And it is assumed that as a trickster one would continuously be sneaky, unpredictable, and unreliable. Yet in A Midsummer Night's Dream, Puck does not flaunt these classic traits, in fact, as the reader, we barley witness them. Not to say that Puck doesn't enjoy playing tricks and messing with mortals’ minds, but it can be argued that he portrays more of a gentle fairy over the sly, devious fairy he was intended to be. Throughout the play are specific instances where Puck is seen to have helped mortals, been reliable to Oberon, and predictable with his "pranks." Oberon even refers to him as "My gentle trickster." However Puck in not completely stripped of his trickster title in this criticism. His classic pranks involving scaring the towns people, misleading the mortals, etc. do not go unnoticed, yet are described as common and unoriginal for a trickster. The author of the article successfully discusses valid points against Puck's role as a trickster and Shakespeare's originality in creating this character.

 

"Infobase Learning - Login." Bloom's Literary Reference Online. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Feb. 2013. 

 

http://www.fofweb.com/Lit/LowerFrame.asp?ItemID=WE54&SID=5&iPin=%20BLTTR010&SingleRecord=True.

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Allison Horn's comment, March 10, 2014 3:52 PM
Does this criticism change you perspective on Puck and Shakespeare after reading this?
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Insults by Shakespeare

Insults by Shakespeare | Cole Hollis' A Midsummer Nights Dream | Scoop.it
Cole Hollis 's insight:

VIDEO CLIP: The video “Insults by Shakespeare - April Gudenrath” is about the interpretations that Shakespeare may have had on the plays that he has written. This video has modern interpretations on the play which helps the viewer’s understand the play better. Shakespeare uses many words and phrases that are confusing and this video helps you understand the text in a funny and accurate way. This video makes you think in a different way while reading text or learning about Shakespeare. In the video you learn that Shakespeare wasn’t only famous for the words he used but for the insults he used. His insults were making Shakespeare famous because his insults made the audience laugh. This video also gives background information to the time period that Shakespeare was in to help you understand the plays better. Overall if your confused on the plays that Shakespeare writes or confused with the messages that Shakespeare is trying to send this video would help you.

 

Gunderath, April. "Insulta YouTube. YouTube, 04 May 2012. Web. 24 Feb. 2013.

 

http://www.tubechop.com/watch/990489

 

 

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