Austin Boie's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Hermia relation to Greek Mythology

Hermia relation to Greek Mythology | Austin Boie's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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HISTORICAL ARTICLE: This passage explains that the name Hermia's name derives from the Greek god Hermes. Hermes is a trickster, and a messenger. The negative meaning traces Hermia's name to the meaning of a whore. This is the same person that distracted the philosopher Aristotle during his working process. The same named person also distracts Lysander and Demetrius's attention during the book away from their normal lives (following her off into the woods).

 

FINDLAY, ALISON. "Hermia." Women In Shakespeare (2010): 185-186. Literary Reference Center. Web. 28 Feb. 2014.

 

http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=a7f3d98c-ffdf-4a54-a946-bd080944ecf6%40sessionmgr4004&vid=13&hid=4204

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Perspective used in A Midsummer Night's Dream

Perspective used in A Midsummer Night's Dream | Austin Boie's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Austin Boie's insight:

LITERARY CRITICISM: This article talks about the anamorphism that Shakespeare used in his play. This is something painters usually use, but Shakespeare implemented something similar into his play. " First he gives us a straight-on look at Athens, then shifts our perspective by obliging us to consider the forest, then brings Athens back in the third panel and says, "Look again."The anamorphic effect arises from the fact that the forest world, though not exactly a grinning skull lying at the base of Theseus'palace, is a kind of crazed mirror of the Athenian world." This explains that instead of the reader having to take on the perspective of the scene, Shakespeare does it for you.

 

Calderwood, James L. "A Midsummer Night's Dream: Anamorphism and Theseus' Dream." Bloom's Literature. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 26 Feb. 2014 <http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&WID=103230&SID=5&iPin=MCIMS005&SingleRecord=True>.

 

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Where Puck's name came from

Where Puck's name came from | Austin Boie's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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SOURCE ARTICLE: This shows how the word Puck is a generic name, meaning "various malevolent spirits." It is also shown how the word may refer to the devil,  even though Shakespeare shows him as a kind trickster.

 

"Puck, In Germanic Mythology." Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition (2013): 1. Literary Reference Center. Web. 12 Feb. 2014.\

 

http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=73d969c3-4ddb-4bfc-b80d-72b1b6fdff16%40sessionmgr111&vid=1&hid=123&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=lfh&AN=39024780

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Globe Theater Connection to A Midsummer Night's Dream

Globe Theater Connection to A Midsummer Night's Dream | Austin Boie's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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IMAGE: This picture represents the Globe Theater, where Shakespeare's plays were preformed. Based on it's lay out it looks like people  in this era were separated by economical class. The stadium is open on top, with people standing on the ground. This seems that when it rained the poor spectators would stand in the rain on mud to watch a play. The upper class, more wealthy citizens get to sit in a balcony away from the rain and in seats when spectating the play. This can connect to how Hermia's father wants her to marry Demetrius, instead of Lysander, because of social class and how they are treated.

 

http://img.zanda.com/item/16090720000003/1024x768/Shakespeares_Globe_Theatre-London.jpg

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James Del Bonis's comment, March 10, 2014 4:53 PM
I like how this image provides an "immersive" feel to the theater.
Nate Mefford's comment, March 11, 2014 8:24 AM
I agree with James i feel as this captures what it feels like to be in the theater when packed.
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A Midsummer Night's Dream - 1935

A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935) Puck - Elf , Oberon's servant. No copyright intended
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VIDEO: Scene from the 1935 version of A Midsummer Night's Dream, describes the scene after Lysander and Hermia run off into the woods, and how puck is ordered to put love potion drops on his eyes. After the fact Puck speaks to Oberon about the Athenian boy.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjSg2BVeCMs

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