A Midsummer Night's Dream
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English literature's 50 key moments from Marlowe to JK Rowling

English literature's 50 key moments from Marlowe to JK Rowling | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
What have been the hinge points in the evolution of Anglo-American literature? Here's a provisional, partisan list

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Exclusive: Peek at 'Shakespeare's Empire Striketh Back'

Exclusive: Peek at 'Shakespeare's Empire Striketh Back' | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Last year I told you about a pop-culture book I was certain would be a hit: William Shakespeare's Star Wars.
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Shakespeare and the Cruelest Month: Spring Imagery in ‘The Winter’s Tale,’ ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream,’ and More

Shakespeare and the Cruelest Month: Spring Imagery in ‘The Winter’s Tale,’ ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream,’ and More | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
The exactness of Shakespeare’s compressed account is wonderful. Daffodils do come before the swallows arrive, and take their chances with the often-cruel winds of March. Violets, primroses, oxlips, and fritillaries are all flowers of early spring.

 

Shakespeare’s favorite month would seem to be April, when “wheat is green, when hawthorn buds appear” (“A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Act 1, Scene 1, line 188). No other month is mentioned half as often in his works as showery, windy, sometimes unforgettably exquisite April.


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Shakespeare on the battlefield: the Globe theatre step out

Shakespeare on the battlefield: the Globe theatre step out | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

The Globe are taking Shakespeare's war plays to their real-life locations – including the bloodiest battlefield on English soil. Alfred Hickling reports

'Look – a molehill!" After scouring a Yorkshire field for the best part of an hour, director Nick Bagnall has found what he's been looking for. We contemplate the small mound of earth. "It gives me goosebumps just looking at it," Bagnall says...


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Peter Brook on A Midsummer Night's Dream: a cook and a concept

Peter Brook on A Midsummer Night's Dream: a cook and a concept | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
In an extract from his new book, Peter Brook explains how this most seductive of Dreams, his legendary 1970 production for the RSC, was made

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Elizabeth Sky-McIlvain's curator insight, April 18, 2013 6:04 PM

This selection came to my attention via a post to English Companion Ning by J.D. Wilson (http://englishcompanion.ning.com/forum/topics/a-concept-needs-another-name?xg_source=activity).  Wilson wryly, and correctly, suggests that students (HS level, but some parts are good also for grade 8) read it in order to prepare for CCSS testing.  If you do this, focus on the last few paragraphs - it will set the stage for analysis of literature to come, and it merits deep reading.  That is going to be hard work.  In fact, every ELA teacher should read this piece, think about the changes to come, and find a way to become a better cook.

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William Shakespeare, the 'king of infinite space' - Telegraph.co.uk

William Shakespeare, the 'king of infinite space' - Telegraph.co.uk | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Telegraph.co.uk William Shakespeare, the 'king of infinite space' Telegraph.co.uk Shakespeare spoke of “the inaudible and noiseless foot of time” – but the revelry will likely be quite audible indeed when the playwright's 450th birthday arrives in...
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Was Shakespeare Shakespeare? 11 Rules for Critical Thinking

Was Shakespeare Shakespeare? 11 Rules for Critical Thinking | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
To be or not to be certain -- an exercise in the art and science of doubt.

It's been argued that Shakespeare changed everything. Yet even

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iPamba's curator insight, April 1, 2013 10:07 PM

11 rules based on 11 quotes by 11 thinkers - all men, of course!

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A Midsummer Night's Dream / Shakespeare's Globe

A Midsummer Night's Dream / Shakespeare's Globe | A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

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Mackenna M Geary's curator insight, December 6, 2013 10:16 PM

Shakespeare is important to everyone!

 

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A Midsummer Night's Dream | Australian Shakespeare Company - Australian Stage Online

A Midsummer Night's Dream | Australian Shakespeare Company
Australian Stage Online
Recently I had the words: “And though she be but little, she is fierce” tattooed on my left rib.
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