Gelsomina's A MidSummer Night's Dream
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Gelsomina's A MidSummer Night's Dream
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"This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled": Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream

"This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled": Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Gelsomina's A MidSummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Gelsomina Gambardella's insight:

   

 

Literary Criticism   

The literary criticism, "This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled": Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream” criticizes the way Shakespeare uses the character Puck as  a trickster and how it is too obvious on what he does in the play and that the topic that Puck is a  trickster is over used throughout the play. In this article, the controversy was on if Puck should be labeled as a trickster. The article talks about different ways that the word trickster could be interpreted by.  For example in the article scholars interpreted Puck as a trickster in this way, “Although tricksters are often "comical if not marginal figures" in many traditions, "they represent sacred beings in some cultures, but not in others" (Hynes and Doty, "Introducing" 7).”   One way that Shakespeare could have wanted the audience to interpret Puck is to be scare of what mortals can do and is a trickster to hide that. The author uses the text from a “ A Midsummer Night’s Dream”  to prove his argument throughout the article. One example of this is the author references to the speech that Puck makes to Bottom during his transformation into a donkey. “Few speeches by Puck reveal more capacity so many traits of the typical trickster as his gleeful threats to the terrified mechanicals, which flee at their first glimpse of the transformed Bottom: “Puck. I’ll follow you: I’ll lead you about a round! Through bog, through bush, through brake, through briar; sometime a horse I’ll be, sometime a hound, a hog, a headless bear, sometime  fire;  and neigh, and bark, and grunt, and roar and burn, like horse, hound, hog, bear, fire, at every turn.”   This quote from “ A Midsummer Night’s dream emphasizes Puck’s powers as a deceiver.  Shakespeare definitely wants the audience to see Puck as a trickster, but Shakespeare may be sending out a message through the character Puck and that message could be that trickster tends to fall into their own traps. In the ariticle the message that Shakespeare is sending out referred too. “He also illustrates yet another common trait of many a trickster—the trickster's tendency to bumble, make mistakes (Doty and Hynes, "Historical" 33), fall "into his own traps," become "the victim of his own ruses" (Makarius 84), and be deceived by his own practical jokes, so that "the inventor of ingenious stratagems is presented as an idiot" and "the master of magical power is sometimes powerless to extricate himself from quandaries" (Makarius 67). I can see the author’s point in this article and it makes sense that the idea of the character Puck can be misinterpreted but I believe Shakespeare didn’t want the character Puck to be misleading and just wanted Puck to be categorized as a trickster and to be a comical aspect to the play.  No one will ever really know how Shakespeare wanted Puck to be interpreted by and this leaves the character Puck up for controversy.

 

 

Evans, Robert C. "'This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled': Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream." Quoted as "'This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled': Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream" in The Trickster, Bloom's Literary Themes. Bloom, Harold, ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishing, 2010. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&SID=5&iPin= BLTTR010&SingleRecord=True  (accessed February 24, 2013).

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Hermia and the Faries

Hermia and the Faries | Gelsomina's A MidSummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Gelsomina Gambardella's insight:

In this picture, Hermia is standing next to a tree. Hermia looks every distraught in this picture because she is confused about her love life. This picture is probably after Lysander went off with Helena and left Hermia behind. Hermia is confused at this point because she thought Lysander was in love with her. Also, in this picture hiding in the forest are fairies. I believe that the fairies are looking like they are whispering and laughing because they are messing with the love affairs of the mortals.

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Why Greene was Angry at Shakespeare

Why Greene was Angry at Shakespeare | Gelsomina's A MidSummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Gelsomina Gambardella's insight:

 

HISTORICAL ARTICLE

 

Shakespeare has been known for writing unique, inspiring, funny, and romantic plays. But, throughout many decades Shakespeare’s plays have been blamed for plagiarism. In the article, “Why Greene was Angry at Shakespeare?” many writers and reporters came to the conclusion that Shakespeare did forge or plagiarized his plays. “ Peter Ackroyd writes: "Accused of being an unlearend ('upstart') plagiarist, Shakespeare would have questioned 'unleamed'... but he could hardly deny the charge of plagiarism;his early plays were bedecked with lines and echoes from Marlowe." Peter Ackroyd agrees that Shakespeare did plagiarize Marlowe.  Shakespeare may have been a “fraud“ when coming to writing his plays because Shakespeare did not have the knowledge of politics or foreign languages. Shakespeare did not attend a University, letting people wonder how he became such a good writer. The topic of whether Shakespeare was a plagiarist is very controversial but this article proves that Shakespeare has been “caught” for plagiarism.

 

Born, Hanspeter, Mary Bly, and S. E. Cerasano. "Why Greene Was Angry At Shakespeare." Medieval & Renaissance Drama In England 25.(2012): 133-173. Literary Reference Center. Web. 3 Feb. 2013.

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Jenna LaChapelle's comment, March 10, 2013 8:43 AM
Do you believe that Shakespeare plagiarized? If you do then what are some examples from his plays that were plagiarized? Do you think there is a way to prove the claims Ackroyd made about Shakespeare, see as Shakespeare lived so long ago? Do you think that this article or any other claims about Shakespeare taking from other writers will affect people’s perception of his timeless plays?
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Fairy Folklore and Mythology in "A Midsummer’s Night Dream" | CulturePotion

Fairy Folklore and Mythology in "A Midsummer’s Night Dream" | CulturePotion | Gelsomina's A MidSummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Gelsomina Gambardella's insight:

                                Shakespeare used many sources while writing “ A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. One of the sources he used was Fairy Folklore and Mythology.  Shakespeare didn’t get all his ideas by himself.  Shakespeare took Fairy Folklore and Mythology and took his time to understand this and put mythology and fairy folklore into his plays. For example, ““A Midsummer’s Night Dream” tells the story of Lysander and Hermia’s unpermitted love, along with Demetrius’ struggle to woo her despite him being the subject of Helena’s amorous obsession (Wells and Taylor XV, 401); however, the plot’s entertainment is attributed to a different set of juxtaposing characters that intervene in the affairs of these young lovers – the fairies. Drawn from European legend and folklore, Shakespeare took inspiration from a variety of fairy lore and mythology that makes itself present throughout the play”. This quote from the article, “Fairy Folklore and Mythology in "A Midsummer’s Night Dream" explains that Shakespeare used Fairy Folklore and Mythology to get inspired to write about love romances or get the idea of what to base his character off of.

 

 

"Fairy Folklore and Mythology in "A Midsummer’s Night Dream" | CulturePotion." Fairy Folklore and Mythology in "A Midsummer’s Night Dream" N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Feb. 2013.

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Insults by Shakespeare - April Gudenrath

http://www.tubechop.com/watch/990489

Gelsomina Gambardella's insight:

 

                 The video “Insults by Shakespeare - April Gudenrath”  is about the interpretations that Shakespeare may have had on the plays that he has written. This video has modern interpretations on the play which helps the viewer’s understand the play better. Shakespeare uses many words and phrases that are confusing and this video helps you understand the text in a funny and accurate way. This video makes you think in a different way while reading text or learning about Shakespeare.  In the video you learn that Shakespeare wasn’t only famous for the words he used but for the insults he used. His insults were making Shakespeare famous because his insults made the audience laugh. This video also gives background information to the time period that Shakespeare was in to help you understand the plays better. Overall if your confused on the plays that Shakespeare writes or confused with the messages that Shakespeare is trying to send this video would help you.

 

"Insults by Shakespeare - April Gudenrath." YouTube. YouTube, 04 May 2012. Web. 24 Feb. 2013.

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