A Mid Summer Nights Dream
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Rescooped by Tyler Corriveau from A mid summer nights dream
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Source: In Greek Mythology, Who was Hippolyta?

Source: In Greek Mythology, Who was Hippolyta? | A Mid Summer Nights Dream | Scoop.it
Hippolyta was a mythological woman who ruled the Amazons, a tribe of warrior women who raised only daughters. In Greek mythology...

Via Austin Berard, matt turcotte
Tyler Corriveau's insight:

In Greek mythology hippolyta was a powerful woman who ruled the amazons, a tribe of warrior women who raised only daughters. The Amazons were objects of fear in Greek culture,  myths would describe them as extremely fierce and powerful. Many stories are told about Hippolyta, and they have conflicting endings; for example, she has been killed by theseus, his son, Hercules, and even her companion Penthesilea in various stories. Some mythologists have suggested that Hippolyta was actually several different women, and this explains the varied endings in the stories told about her.

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Rescooped by Tyler Corriveau from Matthew's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Image: The Elizabethan Theatre

Image: The Elizabethan Theatre | A Mid Summer Nights Dream | Scoop.it

Via Matthew Bonas
Tyler Corriveau's insight:

This painting of the Elizabethan Theatre. From this image you can observe  the actors on stage as well as the most of the audience. But it may look like there are women actors are on stage but ther are accuatly men. During this time period women were forbidden to act or perform. Women were only expected to have children and take care of the home. For example, women were expected to clean and cook in the home. This pcture examplifys the difference in the gender roles of male and female of that time period. This image is a good precedent of how plays  were performed during this era with only man performers.

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Rescooped by Tyler Corriveau from A mid summer nights dream
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Historical Article: Women and eloquence in Shakespeare and Austen

Historical Article: Women and eloquence in Shakespeare and Austen | A Mid Summer Nights Dream | Scoop.it

Via Matthew Bonas, matt turcotte
Tyler Corriveau's insight:

The histoical article i picked for my scoop it, talks about the sterotyipcal women in this time period. They would cook and clean while the man works and take care of the children. the women were not allowed the same rights as men, for example women could not be an actor in a play or choose who they are married too. in this time period it is all up to the male.

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Rescooped by Tyler Corriveau from A mid summer nights dream
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A Midsummer Night's Dream Parody

Feat. Joe Fillmore and Eric Roggow. KIDS DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME!

Via matt turcotte
Tyler Corriveau's insight:

I choose this video because it shows a funny verison of the fight between lysander and demeteruis in Mid summer Nights, the bad acting and horrible quailty gave me a better understanding of that part in the play. I Liked it because it moked the play in a good funny way.

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Rescooped by Tyler Corriveau from Matthew's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Literary Criticism: The Language in A Midsummer Night's Dream

Literary Criticism: The Language in A Midsummer Night's Dream | A Mid Summer Nights Dream | Scoop.it

Via Matthew Bonas
Tyler Corriveau's insight:

Some time  after completeing the A Midsummer Night's Dream, Shakespeare's play would attract critics. A well known critic that wrote a criticism  piece on Shakespeare's famous play was Jay L. Halio. Jay argues that although the play is known to be a pretty laughable showing, there are shady and rather sinster words in the play., themes, and lines hidden and intertwined within the play itself. Halio says that "there is a good deal more going on beneath the play's surface than many have been willing to notice, or have deliberately been persuaded  into not noticing". the debate between Oberon and Puck in act 3, scene 2 reflects a fundamental tension in the play between comic reassurance and the suggestion of something dark and threatening". Halio is only disagreeing   that Shakespeare incorprated  dark lines into the play, but that Bottom's frequent malapropisms also add to the growing sense of linguistic  disorder. This means that the character Bottom frequently uses the wrong words while he is talking, especially words that sound alike. At one point in the play Bottom says that he will aggravate his voice so that he will roar you as gently as any sucking dove. He will roar you an 'twere any nightingale. In this line of the play the word aggravate doesnt belong, therefore this will cause some confusion. Halio clearly used realible information while writing this criticism. This is why Halio's arguement in Nightingales that Roar The Language of A Midsummer Night's Dream are  valid because he brought up many different points with clear and precise evidence from the play.

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