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SSE freezes energy prices until 2016

SSE freezes energy prices until 2016 | A level economics | Scoop.it
Energy supplier SSE says it will freeze domestic gas and electricity prices at their current levels until 2016.
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London should have a separate, higher minimum wage

London should have a separate, higher minimum wage | A level economics | Scoop.it
Over the last decade and a half, the difference in pay between the lowest paid decile of workers in London with that of the rest of the country has shrunk. This means we should consider introducing...
Amy Robinson's insight:

A minimum wage for just London. Makes sense as the living costs are much higher in the capital, and projected benefits (in the paragraph below and in the article) look promising. The thought of a living wage has been floating around, but for a whole country. By having a higher minimum wage in London it will not affect the employment levels in the rest of the UK, but will bring London's employment back to equilibrium as firms may have been earning supernormal profits. Furthermore, it will hopefully prevent further strike action from workers such as tube workers that went on strike earlier this year. However, this causes further divisions in already unsettled UK regions, with London seeing most of the economic gains. Also, it may lead to government failure if it causes a disproportionate change in unemployment than increases in overall income and income taxes. The law of unintended consequences may take action, as cost increases in the capital may result in firms shutting down and being unable to do business or run businesses in the North, resulting in further unemployment.

 

"In a recent research project for the Centre for London think-tank, we estimated that a London-wide minimum wage could be introduced at a level of £6.75 now and be economically equivalent – that is, have the same impact on low paid sectors – to the current UK-wide minimum wage of £6.31. This would increase the income from employment for around 175,000 London workers by up to £800 a year. The exchequer would benefit from increased payroll taxes and reductions in in-work benefit payments of around £61m."

 
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Samsung, Philips and Panasonic hit with record £1.2bn cartel fine - The Guardian

Samsung, Philips and Panasonic hit with record £1.2bn cartel fine - The Guardian | A level economics | Scoop.it
The GuardianSamsung, Philips and Panasonic hit with record £1.2bn cartel fineThe GuardianThe European commission has imposed the largest cartel fine in its history, imposing a €1.47bn (£1.2bn) penalty on seven firms including Philips, Samsung SDI ...

Via Bart Wielenga, GENA4 2014
Amy Robinson's insight:

OLIGOPOLY// REGULATION//PRICEDISCRIMINATION

The European commission has imposed the largest cartel fine in its history, imposing a €1.47bn (£1.2bn) penalty on seven firms including Philips, Samsung SDI and Panasonic for fixing the price of the now outmoded cathode ray tubes used in televisions and computer monitors.The companies fixed prices, shared markets, restricted output and allocated customers between themselves, on a worldwide basis.

Chunghwa, LG Electronics, Philips and Samsung SDI

Chunghwa, which blew the whistle, escaped a fine while others were given reductions in their penalties in exchange for co-operation.

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Stuck on climate broil: ratio of fossil fuels to renewables unchanged in twenty five years. Now what?

Stuck on climate broil: ratio of fossil fuels to renewables unchanged in twenty five years. Now what? | A level economics | Scoop.it
Climate battle being lost as renewable energy fails to dent fossil fuel dominance.

Via pdeppisch
Amy Robinson's insight:

Geog3- Weather (Climate change, targets not being reached or adapted to current levels well enough)

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Russia Sanctions Could Put Germany Inc. on the Front Lines of Trade War

Russia Sanctions Could Put Germany Inc. on the Front Lines of Trade War | A level economics | Scoop.it
Germany sells Russia almost as much as it buys from it: Exports totaled €37.9 billion in 2012, with some 300,000 jobs depending on the trade

Via Euro Zone
Amy Robinson's insight:

Unit 4

Geog3- Development and Globalisation/Conflict

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Oligopoly price wars - who will be the winner?

Two useful articles about the news that Morrisons have a £176m pre-tax loss for the year to February 2, and the strong impact that their plans to compete hard with the discount retailers has had on the stock market value of Tesco and Sainsburys. We often cite the UK supermarket.

Via Geoff Riley
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Childcare subsidy scheme boosted

Childcare subsidy scheme boosted | A level economics | Scoop.it
Working families could get a childcare subsidy of up to £2,000 per child by 2015, under new government proposals. (#Econ2 #Econ4 Supply Side Policy: More support for Childcare.
Amy Robinson's insight:
Econ 3 Supply side policy Allows more labour market flexibility, along with the possibility of empowering women more and changing perceptions that women will work less due to child care decreasing wage differentials and discrimination due to gender.
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A Level Economists: Exchange Rates: Fixed vs Floating (A2 Macroeconomics)

A Level Economists: Exchange Rates: Fixed vs Floating (A2 Macroeconomics) | A level economics | Scoop.it
Amy Robinson's insight:

Good analysis that is clearly presented of +/- of fixed and floating exchange rate. Could be used in essay for single currency. 

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Panasonic offers China pollution pay

Panasonic offers China pollution pay | A level economics | Scoop.it
Japanese electronics firm Panasonic announces it will pay its staff working in China a premium to compensate them for high levels of pollution. (“@Keysonomics: AS Econ. Costs of pollution and negative externalities?

Via Dan Martin
Amy Robinson's insight:


"As well as the pollution premium, Panasonic said it would increase base pay for all of its workers by 2,000 yen ($19.5; £11.7)."

Econ3- market failure,

Geog3 weather-pollution AND D&G unsustainable economic growth

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Labour Market across the UK March 2014 - YouTube

A summary of the UK labour market covering the period November 2013 to January 2014. This includes the latest employment and unemployment figures, average we...

Via Graham Watson
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Unit 3

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Graham Watson's curator insight, March 19, 2014 7:00 AM

The official ONS release, now appearing in a GJW presentation near you...

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Inequality 'costs Britain £39bn a year'

Inequality 'costs Britain £39bn a year' | A level economics | Scoop.it
Thinktank puts a figure on the annual cost of the gap between rich and poor and calls for politicians to act (RT @MsLadyPhyll: “@uhequality: Inequality 'costs Britain £39bn a year' http://t.co/vh6xOuOIt2...

Via Bruce Fellowes
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