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Networks thrive in complexity

Networks thrive in complexity | A Holistic Approach to Global Planning in Complex Adaptive Systems | Scoop.it

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle. One good example of complexity that we can try to fathom is nature itself. Networks thrive in nature. As Howard Bloom stated in a speech at Yale University


Via Ashish Umre
Tim Williamson's insight:

Excellent work.  I would add that to properly understand complex systems on the global scale requires a holistic approach.  You can somewhat understand the mechanics of the system only generally since these systems are emergent by definition, but to 'influence' the outcomes of an emergent system requires a holistic understanding.

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The US Does not have a border problem

Tim Williamson's insight:

The US does not have a border problem.    

In my opinion, we are, and have been for sometime now, at the 'either that or forget about any border' point.
 

Here's the way I see it....stick with me as I explain this.

Whether China overtly expresses interests in becoming the next hegemonic global leader or not, they will have hegemony regardless; but only as long as the EU remains as a weak federal union, and as the African Union, the AU, remains weak.
 

What gives the EU and the AU the possibility of preventing Chinese hegemony? The population statistics of those regions will be economically mature in the near future, and will be sizable enough to offer some competition against a maturing Chinese economy as Xi Jinping moves his country toward his 'China Dream.' But the EU and the AU must structure stronger federal unions more akin to that of the US federal system of semi-sovereign states subordinate to a federal national government.
 

How does this impact the US? As the rest of the global federal regions, and as China, matures economically and politically, the US will fall further behind in global influence, economics, education, and in the ability to morally and legally project its military power around the world. The US does not have the populations numbers to compete in an environment where the EU, the AU and China (or especially a Sino-Russian alliance) have economic parity with the US. We will lose out in more ways than just economically.
 

So what is the solution? The US needs a larger economic base of consumers and producers than we have now by numbers so much larger than simple internal birth rates will allow, if the US is compete with China in terms of influence, economics, and having a strong voice in global affairs like the US has now. We must have more consumers and producers. But how do we do that?
 

Well, trade treaties do help. The best way however is to strengthen our ties with Canada, Mexico, and the central American states all the way to the Panama Canal. The US is helping our neighbors with numerous financial aid packages, crime stopping programs, and many of their citizens either were born in the US, have relatives and family in the US, and our dollars are flooding their economies.
 

So let's just make it official and form a North American Federal system that extends from the Panama Canal all the way to the North Pole and get it over with. We're already inextricably tied together - besides, the Panama Canal is only 48 miles long. It would be lots cheaper and easier to secure and maintain.
 

© Timothy Williamson, 10 July 2014, Alabama, USA

tim@williamsoncontracting.biz 

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Quantifying ‘Causality’ in Complex Systems: Understanding Transfer Entropy

Quantifying ‘Causality’ in Complex Systems: Understanding Transfer Entropy | A Holistic Approach to Global Planning in Complex Adaptive Systems | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.

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Complex systems made simple

Complex systems made simple | A Holistic Approach to Global Planning in Complex Adaptive Systems | Scoop.it
Network scientists at Northeastern have designed an algorithm capable of identifying the subset of components that reveal a complex system's overall nature.

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Eli Levine's curator insight, July 10, 11:02 AM

Way cool. And useful. 

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Emergent Sensing of Complex Environments by Mobile Animal Groups

Science 1 February 2013: 
Vol. 339 no. 6119 pp. 574-576 
DOI: 10.1126/science.1225883

 

ABSTRACT

The capacity for groups to exhibit collective intelligence is an often-cited advantage of group living. Previous studies have shown that social organisms frequently benefit from pooling imperfect individual estimates. However, in principle, collective intelligence may also emerge from interactions between individuals, rather than from the enhancement of personal estimates. Here, we reveal that this emergent problem solving is the predominant mechanism by which a mobile animal group responds to complex environmental gradients. Robust collective sensing arises at the group level from individuals modulating their speed in response to local, scalar, measurements of light and through social interaction with others. This distributed sensing requires only rudimentary cognition and thus could be widespread across biological taxa, in addition to being appropriate and cost-effective for robotic agents.

 


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Shady El Damaty's curator insight, February 4, 2013 3:22 AM

Fascinating paper published in February's edition of Science. We often consider intelligence as an emergent phenomena at the scale of individual organisms.  Yet, complex social systems and structures may also exhibit behavior reflecting the predispositions of its members as a whole.  Perhaps we can view the dynamics of societies from this scaled perspective to better understand the issues facing our modern society.

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Networks thrive in complexity

Networks thrive in complexity | A Holistic Approach to Global Planning in Complex Adaptive Systems | Scoop.it

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle. One good example of complexity that we can try to fathom is nature itself. Networks thrive in nature. As Howard Bloom stated in a speech at Yale University


Via Ashish Umre
Tim Williamson's insight:

Excellent work.  I would add that to properly understand complex systems on the global scale requires a holistic approach.  You can somewhat understand the mechanics of the system only generally since these systems are emergent by definition, but to 'influence' the outcomes of an emergent system requires a holistic understanding.

more...
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What is complex systems science: Opportunities and insights. Yaneer Bar-Yam

Only 15 years ago, complex systems science had to justify its existence. Today it is taking the world by storm. Networks, big data, cascading crises, extreme events, the word "systems," and many other ideas are widely accepted and the basis for new advances and increasing the scope of science. What is this movement about, what changes are in store, and what are the opportunities for engagement? We will answer these questions, and others that you have, in this web presentation.

 

What is complex systems science: Opportunities and insights.

Yaneer Bar-Yam

Monday, December 17
12:00 to 12:30 PM


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Tim Williamson's comment, December 15, 2012 4:27 PM
Good read.
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Connecting Core Percolation and Controllability of Complex Networks : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Connecting Core Percolation and Controllability of Complex Networks : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | A Holistic Approach to Global Planning in Complex Adaptive Systems | Scoop.it
Core percolation is a fundamental structural transition in complex networks related to a wide range of important problems. Recent advances have provided us an analytical framework of core percolation in uncorrelated random networks with arbitrary degree distributions. Here we apply the tools in analysis of network controllability. We confirm analytically that the emergence of the bifurcation in control coincides with the formation of the core and the structure of the core determines the control mode of the network. We also derive the analytical expression related to the controllability robustness by extending the deduction in core percolation. These findings help us better understand the interesting interplay between the structural and dynamical properties of complex networks.

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Sibout Nooteboom's curator insight, July 13, 12:52 AM

Fascinating advances

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Refreshing read on regularities in complex systems

Refreshing read on regularities in complex systems | A Holistic Approach to Global Planning in Complex Adaptive Systems | Scoop.it
I just came across this blog post by Cynthia Kurtz, who wrote with Dave Snowden the paper "The new dynamics of Strategy: Sense-making in a complex and complicated world". Cynthia describes in her p...

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V International Biennial Symposium “Complexity 2013 – for a Sustainable Development

June 3 - 5, 2013
University of Camaguey "Ignacio Agramonte Loynaz", Cuba

https://sites.google.com/site/complejidad2013camaguey/complexity2013


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The Single Theory That Could Explain Emergence, Organisation And The Origin of Life | MIT Technology Review

The Single Theory That Could Explain Emergence, Organisation And The Origin of Life | MIT Technology Review | A Holistic Approach to Global Planning in Complex Adaptive Systems | Scoop.it
Biochemists have long imagined that autocatalytic sets can explain the origin of life. Now a new mathematical approach to these sets has even broader implications
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Introduction to Complexity | Santa Fe Institute

Introduction to Complexity | Santa Fe Institute | A Holistic Approach to Global Planning in Complex Adaptive Systems | Scoop.it

Instructor: Melanie Mitchell
Launch date: January 28, 2013
Prerequisites: None
Cost: Free
Credit offered: None, though everyone who successfully finishes the course will receive a certificate of completion from the Santa Fe Institute.
Course length: 11 weeks
Approximate workload: 3-6 hours per week


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Complejidady Economía's curator insight, December 28, 2012 5:09 PM

Curso en línea

Trimtab-in-Training 's comment, January 2, 2013 6:36 PM
Thank You, Thank You, Thank You, Thank You, Thank You, Thank You...(pause for breathe) THANK YOU for this post! This is awesome!
John Symons's comment, January 3, 2013 1:22 PM
You're welcome!