A Geographer's Scrapbook
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A Geographer's Scrapbook
stuff in human and cultural geography
Curated by Anna
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Discover Ancient Rome in Google Earth

"See Rome as it looked in 320 AD and fly down to see famous buildings and monuments in 3D. Select the 'Ancient Rome 3D' layer under Gallery in Google Earth."


Via Seth Dixon
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Giuseppe Corsaro's curator insight, August 13, 2013 8:32 AM

Guardare l'antica Roma così come appariva nel 320 d.C. e volare giù per vedere edifici famosi in 3D. Seleziona 'Ancient Rome 3D'  nella Gallery di Google Earth.

Neville R Langit's curator insight, January 13, 2014 9:56 PM

got to love google earth

Keith Mielke's curator insight, January 17, 2014 4:10 PM

It's astounding how modern technology can really take us back to ancient times to see how others not only lived but prospered.

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The Italians who want to be Austrian

The Italians who want to be Austrian | A Geographer's Scrapbook | Scoop.it
It is Italy's richest province, and has been part of the country for almost 100 years - but some in South Tyrol just do not feel fully Italian.

Via Seth Dixon
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Scarpaci Human Geography's curator insight, December 14, 2012 11:13 AM

Questions to Ponder: How to political borders reveal and conceal "the truth" about places on either side of the line?  What elements are a part of a regions heritage?  Can regions have multiple, overlapping heritages?  How does devolution impact the whole country?

Allison Anthony's curator insight, December 14, 2012 1:46 PM

Take note Kate and Johnny!!

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 30, 2014 8:14 PM

Being an eighth Tyrolean, I remember my great uncles and other family members complaining about this at every family reunion. Newer generations in my family would refer to themselves as Italian, and the arguments would ensue. That being said, it is no surprise that those living in what was once Tyrol have faced conflict. Historically, peoples with languages, cultural heritages, or religions that differ from the rest of a country usually hold grievances. During the time of Mussolini, Italians were encouraged to move to the northern reaches and Italian was forcibly taught in the school systems. Italy's past of forcing the Austrian speaking Tyroleans to assimilate into a more Italian culture may remain, but fortunately, they have worked to preserve their culture. The bilingual nature of this region allows for the people to thrive in business and tourism. Unfortunately, this autonomous state is facing dark times as Italy's financial crisis puts pressure on South Tyrol by increasing taxes. Many see this as a continuation of Italian oppression on a not so Italian demographic.