A design journey
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Five Principles of Writing for Users | UX Magazine

Five Principles of Writing for Users | UX Magazine | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

Designing user interfaces is not only about structure, content and behavior - in the end it's all about meaning. How does the receiver interpret the information? Communicating by design in a multi device landscape is a challenge when both users and contexts are unknown.  Here is an article with a few simple principles of writing for successful user experiences.

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A design journey
A journey along the creative landscape with stops for UX consumption
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A Roadmap To Becoming An A/B Testing Expert - Smashing Magazine

A Roadmap To Becoming An A/B Testing Expert - Smashing Magazine | A design journey | Scoop.it
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Mobile Design Patterns: A Practical Look - Designmodo

Mobile Design Patterns: A Practical Look - Designmodo | A design journey | Scoop.it
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Design for Fingers, Touch & People: How people really hold and touc...


Via Fred Zimny
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The Many Facets of UX Design

The Many Facets of UX Design | A design journey | Scoop.it
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Navigating the Mobile Jungle | UX Magazine

Navigating the Mobile Jungle | UX Magazine | A design journey | Scoop.it
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How to anticipate users’ needs before they’re needed

How to anticipate users’ needs before they’re needed | A design journey | Scoop.it

Via Mario K. Sakata, Fred Zimny
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Bringing Users into Your Process Through Participatory Design

Hannes's insight:

I think that well conducted user research is the foundation of great experiences. And don't fear the expenses, because with the right preparation it can be a well placed investment saving designers (and users) future headaches. Here is a comprehensive guide to participatory research and design explaining what it means to frame objectives, plan activities, facilitate data gathering and analyze findings.

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How to create navigation that guide users to the goals

How to create navigation that guide users to the goals | A design journey | Scoop.it

Via Anthony Besnault
Hannes's insight:

When I go shopping for clothes there is one thing that makes me run out of the store: when I can't determine if the clothes I'm looking at are designed for men or women. Sounds a bit shallow right, limiting myself to the gender stereotypes, blinded by the fear of doing wrong. But I think most people get frustrated when they can't create an order around themselves because of ambiguous labels. Users feel the same when they are browsing through content on a web site, consequently it's crucial that navigation match user expectations.

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Seven Principles of Conversion-Centered Design

Seven Principles of Conversion-Centered Design | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

Converting users step by step:

1. Drive traffic

2. Attract visitors

4. Guide them to the right choice

4. Make an irresistible offer

5. Reduce all friction in order to realize the conversion

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The Importance of Emotion in Design

The Importance of Emotion in Design | A design journey | Scoop.it

Via UX Goeroe
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How to Help Your Users Take Action | UX Magazine

How to Help Your Users Take Action | UX Magazine | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

People in average spend less time on each new web site they visit while browsing all the digital noise. Consequently it's essential that users understand how to take the right action with desired outcome using minimal mental effort. In order to set the stage for such usable experiences without user confusion we must learn the psychology behind the actions. What makes you take action? Check out this article.

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Patterns for Multiscreen Strategies

Read more here: http://precious-forever.com/2011/05/26/patterns-for-multiscreen-strategies/
Hannes's insight:

After the mobile revolution took palce internet has become a much more dynamic medium, like it was intended to be, where a fixed 980 pixel layout is just not enough in order to reach all users. Today web design is about making content accessible through multiple digital channels, in suitable formats for various devices. But designing for multiple screens can be problematic since the user needs are constant but the technological conditions are diverse, so how can we rise to the challange and adopt to the new deigital landscape? Here are a set of patterns that might be a step in the right direction in order to cover the most essential aspects of multiscreen design.

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Essential Analytics Reports for UX Strategists

Essential Analytics Reports for UX Strategists | A design journey | Scoop.it

Via Mario K. Sakata, Michael Allenberg
Hannes's insight:

Today the web is drowened in content and users are flooded by impression. Consequently it's a real challenge to stand out, attract and convert users. So how can we make sure that our design decisions result in desired outcomes? Luckily web sites are dynamic creatures that can easily be changed in order to satisfy the users - if we just know where the problems are. Gathering, interpreting and understanding how to use analytic data is one way to identify areas of improvement and point designers in the right direction.

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Newz Duniya's curator insight, February 3, 9:04 AM

nice information, thanks for sharing.

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Context Defines the Future User Experience

Context Defines the Future User Experience | A design journey | Scoop.it

Via Fred Zimny
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30 Useful User Experience (UX) Tools - Usability Geek

30 Useful User Experience (UX) Tools - Usability Geek | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

We've seen them before, lists with tools for designers. But they serve a purpose,  UX is growing and new tools pop up like mushrooms after rain these days. Surveys, card sorting sessions, usability tests, heat maps, wireframe design and prototyping are just a few examples of activities easily set up online if you just know where to find the right resources.

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Outdated UX patterns and alternatives

Outdated UX patterns and alternatives | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

Trends play an important role in web design because people adopt frequently used patterns and expect other applications to act alike. At the same time no one can choose to use something without memorizing how it works, the procedural memory will register every interaction and build mental models. Consequently, design choices should be done carefully in order to not establish harmful patterns that will be complicated to adjust later on. So be careful what you teach your users! Here is a set of commonly used patterns that may do more harm than good in the long run.

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The Emotional Side of UX: Turning Casual Visitors into Brand Evangelists

The Emotional Side of UX: Turning Casual Visitors into Brand Evangelists | A design journey | Scoop.it
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An Icon is Worth 1,000 Words | UX Booth

An Icon is Worth 1,000 Words | UX Booth | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

Why are signs so important in traffic? They are recognizable and communicate rules necessary to maintain order on the streets. Steering a vehicle in high speed on a crowded highway limits the attention span and consequently crucial information must reach the driver's awareness without causing distraction. Imagine a world where all traffic signs are designed uniform and contains entirely text based information.

 

Using icons in the right way will have similar effects on UX, illustrating functionality, supporting intuition and streamlining navigation. The only problem is that different people, with varying expectations might interpret icons in different ways since there is no driving licence required for the web (can't wait for a fully standardized iconic language for digital design).

 

One way to keep the advantages of visual communication without causing any user confusion is to combine icons with text. Assuming there is enough space... If replacing the text with solely icons is the only option because of constraints, my advice is to make the icons so universal that if they were traffic signs no lives would be in danger.

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Behavior Design

Behavior Design | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

Currently the market for lifestyle management services is growing and new web solutions pushing people to change behavior pop up everyday. But how do we persuade users to change behavior? Humans are by nature constantly trying to gain control over the situation, and as a result the first step is to educate users and make sure they are fully aware of the consequences a change will lead to. The next step is to make sure that users are motivated enough to put in the effort required to complete the change and that they have the ability to do it. Great, now the users are ready to go through with the change, at least mentally, but in order to go from thought to action there must be a trigger, the final push. The last step is to reward the users so they will stay committed to the new behavior. In summary the main factors of persuasive design are awareness, motivation, ability, trigger and reward.

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Lessons from "Seductive Interaction Design"

Lessons from "Seductive Interaction Design" | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

Interaction design is not all about usability, the final goal is always to attract users and make them satisfied. So how do we utilize technology in order to seduce human beings? 1. Minimize the cognitive load by mapping users' mental models and ability to associate. 2. Trigger positive emotional responses by finding the moment that matters and setting the stage for fun and engaging interactions.

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Google UX design with heart

Google UX design with heart | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

I just love the way Gmail's reminder makes me feel a little bit embarrassed, but so grateful, when I forget to attach the file as I intended. Everyone need a guardian UX angel in the noisy and fast paced digital world. But how can we identify, and designing for, common user mistakes? Do the research, define the target population, build a prototype, make sure that real users will get a chance to test it and pay attention to the details.

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When To Prototype, When To Wireframe - How Much Fidelity Can You Afford? | Usability Geek

When To Prototype, When To Wireframe - How Much Fidelity Can You Afford? | Usability Geek | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

How much fidelity that is affordable is an important decision in many design projects. My answer is that it depends on several factors like the purpose of the deliverable, the target audience and the current phase in the process. The rule of thumb must be to use minimum fidelity early in the process so iterating over a wide range of ideas will be cheap and fast and thereafter add details when the stakeholders are satisfied. Start to define the content/functionality, find a structure that is easy to navigate, map the UI flow, draw wireframes of each state, build an interactive prototype and finally add the graphical details.

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Mobile interfaces that adapt to your skills

Mobile interfaces that adapt to your skills | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

Users always have a set of expectations when they interact with a new UI oganized in their mental models. So when we build applications, the only way to deliver a usable first time experience is to make it work like the users expect. So let's design visual clues, interaction patterns and other ways to communicate affordances that the users will understand. The probem is that a UI full of functionality requires way too much explanation for a tiny mobile screen - it will be cluttered. So how can we design a clean UI with a huge set of requirements, is it possible to hide advanced features, activate them by invisble interaction patterns and invite the users to gradually learn how to use them? This article proposes an interesting solution: visual clues that fade out after the users learn how to interact with the UI.

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How to go from Research to Design Solution | UX Lady

How to go from Research to Design Solution | UX Lady | A design journey | Scoop.it

Via David Ky, Claudia Lis Cabrera, Terry Patterson
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Charlie Keum's curator insight, February 7, 6:35 AM

Google's best practices in research before user experience.

Terry Patterson's comment, February 24, 1:06 PM
It is interesting how many times designers embark into projects because someone is dictating what to do. In my organization this is almost the norm. The sad part of this is that many hours are spent in the wrong designs, and the wrong solutions.
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How humans read web pages

How humans read web pages | A design journey | Scoop.it
Hannes's insight:

Readablity is one of the key factors in order to create usable web sites in my opinion. So how do humans perceive and process content on the web? One important thing to keep in mind is that users do not consume web content like magazines or books, because browsing takes places in a sea of noise distcracting us what we actually aim for. Consequently people learn how to filter the information, so if we know how people do that we can design accordingly, suit their mental models and help them focus on the things that matter. Here is an interesting article about a phenomen called banner blindness including advice how to consider it in web design.

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