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A Cultural History of Advertising
A peek at the past, present and future implications of our consumer culture
Curated by k3hamilton
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Lillian Gilbreth's Kitchen practical 1920s: How it reinvented the modern Kitchen

Lillian Gilbreth's Kitchen practical 1920s: How it reinvented the modern Kitchen | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

By Alexandra Lange

"..Lillian Moller Gilbreth, industrial psychologist and engineer, was the mother of 12 children. She and husband and partner Frank B. Gilbreth, inventors of what is known as motion study, pioneered the use of short films to watch how industrial processes and office tasks were done, breaking them down into component parts (which they called “therbligs,” Gilbreth backward) to determine how to make a job faster and less taxing. They tested many of their ideas on their children, establishing “the one best way” to take a bath, training preteens to touch type, and charting age-appropriate chores for each child."

"Even though she did not do it herself, Gilbreth still considered housework unpaid labor, and as such, capable of efficiencies. The worker in the kitchen in the 1920s was often not a servant but the lady of the house, who spent an estimated 50 percent of her day there.....women became the targets of intense marketing campaigns for products large and small. Gilbreth worked for these manufacturers, and thus is complicit in the rise of consumerism for the home, but she never made explicit endorsements."

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Lynzee's curator insight, February 13, 2013 3:36 PM

Re-incenting the kitchen- food and drink in the 1920s

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WGBH American Experience . Streamliners: America's Lost Trains | PBS

WGBH American Experience . Streamliners: America's Lost Trains | PBS | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Biography: Industrial Designers and Streamliners...

1930s

"As the country struggled to emerge from its economic slump, Americans were captivated by the streamlined look. "Streamlined trains," wrote one historian, "stimulated public faith in a future fueled by technological innovation." Railroads paved the way for streamlining in the auto industry. Trucks, buses, and of course airplanes followed suit. It wasn't only large machines that were streamlined. Pencil sharpeners, ball-point pens, and kitchen mixers, which had no reason to be aerodynamic, took on the look."

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Contributors: M. F. Agha Design in 30s and 40s

Dr. Leslie and the Composing Room.
1934 - 1942 An Important time in the Development of American Graphic Design.
An MFA Thesis Project Written and Designed by Erin K Malone.

"M.F. Agha was educated in Kiev and Paris. After working for Vogue in Berlin he was brought to the US in 1929 by publisher Condé Nast. Agha proved himself with Vogue magazine by showing that the art director was an integral part of the editorial process and was soon given the art directorship of Vanity Fair and House and Garden as well. He was a pioneer with the use of sans serif typefaces, duotones, full color photographs and bleed images. Agha led the field in the use of leading photographers of his day. Edward Steichen, Cecil Beaton, Edward Weston, Louise Dahl-Wolfe and many others. He also brought his readers the works of Masters like Matisse, Derain and Picasso years before other American magazines. He left Condé Nast Publications in 1943 (after Nast died) and became a successful freelance consultant. He served as President of the AIGA from 1953-1955 and was awarded the AIGA Gold medal in 1957. His contributions to the field of magazine publishing changed the nature of magazine design and redefined the role of the designer and art director. "Issues:
August-September 1939

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George Lois on Design

George Lois on Design | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Visit georgelois.com...
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one design era > american streamlined design 1930s

one design era > american streamlined design 1930s | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Futuristic and cosmic design of streamlining in the 30s. Great examples here!

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Alexey Brodovitch - Modernist Design in the 30's comes to America

Alexey Brodovitch - Modernist Design in the 30's comes to America | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"Bodovitch was one of the pioneers to bring modernist ideas to America.*
Design of the early thirties was conservative and lacked of radical experiments. This could be explained by the economic situation after the Wall street crash in 1929. Many companies felt the need to show stability and used trusted methods in their advertisement design....

As expected his work didn't go unnoticed in America. The photographer Ralph Steiner who worked for Harper's Bazaar, recognized the potential of Brodovitch as a designer. He introduced him to Carmel Snow, editor-in-chief of the magazine whom immediately offered him a job....Brodovitch created a harmonious and meaningful whole using avant-garde photography, typography and illustration. After being hired he asked several old friends like Man Ray, Jean Cocteau, Raoul Dufy, Marc Chagall and A.M. Cassandre to work for the magazine. Cassandre created several of the Bazaar covers between 1937 and 1940.
Brodovitch was the first art director to integrate image and text. Most american magazines at that time used text and illustration seperately, dividing them by wide white margins...'

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Erte Museum Harpers Bazaar Covers Art Deco in the 20s-30s

Erte Museum Harpers Bazaar Covers Art Deco in the 20s-30s | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
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