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A Cultural History of Advertising
A peek at the past, present and future implications of our consumer culture
Curated by k3hamilton
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Sexy 65 Corvair TV Commercial

Looks like the model's the one that's unsafe at any speed in this intro ad for the redesigned '65 Corvair. Just imagine this one running on Bonanza in the fall of '64

"no feeling in all the world like the one behind this wheel...agile performance to go with its breathtaking beauty."

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The Nader Page | History Essential Nader

"The crusading attorney first made headlines in 1965 with his book Unsafe at Any Speed, a scathing indictment that lambasted the auto industry for producing unsafe vehicles. The book led to congressional hearings and a series of automobile safety laws passed in 1966.

Since 1966, Nader has been responsible for: at least eight major federal consumer protection laws such as the motor vehicle safety laws, Safe Drinking Water Act; the launching of federal regulatory agencies such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environment Protection Agency (EPA), and Consumer Product Safety Administration; the recall of millions of defective motor vehicles; access to government through the Freedom of Information Act of 1974; and for many lives saved..."

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The Reports of the Surgeon General: The 1964 Report on Smoking and Health

The Reports of the Surgeon General: The 1964 Report on Smoking and Health | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"...Meeting at the National Library of Medicine on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, from November 1962 through January 1964, the committee reviewed more than 7,000 scientific articles with the help of over 150 consultants. Terry issued the commission's report on January 11, 1964, choosing a Saturday to minimize the effect on the stock market and to maximize coverage in the Sunday papers. As Terry remembered the event, two decades later, the report "hit the country like a bombshell. It was front page news and a lead story on every radio and television station in the United States and many abroad.

 

The report highlighted the deleterious health consequences of tobacco use. Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General held cigarette smoking responsible for a 70 percent increase in the mortality rate of smokers over non-smokers. The report estimated that average smokers had a nine- to ten-fold risk of developing lung cancer compared to non-smokers: heavy smokers had at least a twenty-fold risk. The risk rose with the duration of smoking and diminished with the cessation of smoking. The report also named smoking as the most important cause of chronic bronchitis and pointed to a correlation between smoking and emphysema, and smoking and coronary heart disease. It noted that smoking during pregnancy reduced the average weight of newborns. On one issue the committee hedged: nicotine addiction. It insisted that the "tobacco habit should be characterized as an habituation rather than an addiction," in part because the addictive properties of nicotine were not yet fully understood, in part because of differences over the meaning of addiction.

 

The 1964 report on smoking and health had an impact on public attitudes and policy. A Gallup Survey conducted in 1958 found that only 44 percent of Americans believed smoking caused cancer, while 78 percent believed so by 1968. In the course of a decade, it had become common knowledge that smoking damaged health, and mounting evidence of health risks gave Terry's 1964 report public resonance. Yet, while the report proclaimed that "cigarette smoking is a health hazard of sufficient importance in the United States to warrant appropriate remedial action," it remained silent on concrete remedies. That challenge fell to politicians. In 1965, Congress required all cigarette packages distributed in the United States to carry a health warning, and since 1970 this warning is made in the name of the Surgeon General. In 1969, cigarette advertising on television and radio was banned, effective September 1970."

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Subliminal seduction gets a second glance | Psychology Today

Subliminal seduction gets a second glance | Psychology Today | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
The new respectability of subliminal persuasion research By Julie Sedivy, Ph.D....

"What's emerging from this fascinating scientific literature is that subliminal messages often can affect thoughts and behavior, at least for a short period of time, and at least if the message aligns with the audience's state of mind at that time. But there's no unique and magical power to messages that are too brief to be seen; their effect is just one part of our human tendency to suck up, process, and act on as many cues in our environment as we possibly can, responding to them without necessarily running them through our filter of conscious awareness."

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Revlon "Charlie" Commercial with Bobby Short - 1970s

Still as classy as when it first aired. Featuring Shelley Hack and music by Bobby Short. Every shot is composed and lit like a Hurrrell photograph... this wa...
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National Organization for Women. Philadelphia Chapter Records, 1968-1977, The Historical Society of Pennsylvania

National Organization for Women. Philadelphia Chapter Records, 1968-1977, The Historical Society of Pennsylvania | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"In October of 1966, several prominent feminist men and women gathered in Washington D. C. to organize and develop the ideas behind a new group, the National Organization for Women. Among the group were Rev. Pauli Murray, an African-American women who was also an Episcopal minister, Aileen Hernandez, who became the second president of N. O. W. in 1971, and Betty Friedan, famed for her book, The Feminine Mystique. At this conference, the founding members of N. O. W. put together their Statement of Purpose. "The purpose of N. O. W. is to take action to bring women into full participation in the mainstream of American society now, exercising all the privileges and responsibilities thereof in truly equal partnership with men.... N. O. W. is dedicated to the proposition that women, first and foremost, are human beings, who, like all other people in our society must have the chance to develop their fullest human potential." Later on, the focus of N. O. W. expanded to include "winning economic equality and securing it with an amendment to the U. S. Constitution that will guarantee equal rights for women; championing abortion rights, reproductive freedom and other women's health issues; opposing racism and fighting bigotry against lesbians and gays; and ending violence against women." As the national organization gained momentum, several Philadelphia women began work to organize their own chapter in 1968..."

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Chapter Thirteen - The Diamond Mind- DeBeers- A diamond os Forever

Chapter Thirteen - The Diamond Mind- DeBeers- A diamond os Forever | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

 

Linkng diamonds to romance through public relations,, movies like Diamonds are Dangerous, Adventures in Diamonds, news stories fed to the press, radio... 1919-onwards

 

"...N. W. Ayer suggested that through a well-orchestrated advertising and public relations campaign, it could significantly alter the "social attitudes" of the public at large and thereby channel American spending toward larger and more expensive diamonds instead of "competitive luxuries." Specifically, the Ayer study stressed the need to vitalize the association in the public's mind between diamonds and romance. Since "young men buy over 90% of all engagement rings," it would be crucial to inculcate in them the idea that diamonds were a gift of love: the larger and finer the diamond, the greater the expression of love. Similarly, young women had to be encouraged to view diamonds as an integral part of any romantic courtship. The study found that there was already an increasing number of marriages among middle-income wage-earners who were "the backbone of the diamond market," and that, if properly cultivated, this trend could provide fertile grounds for diamond sales in the future..."

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The Outrageously Sexist Ads Of The Mad Men Era That Some Companies Wish We'd Forget

The Outrageously Sexist Ads Of The Mad Men Era That Some Companies Wish We'd Forget | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Which company used this tagline: "Is it always illegal to kill a woman?
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Mad Men: 1960s Pop Culture in Ads

Mad Men: 1960s Pop Culture in Ads | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Reminisce raises a glass to Mad Men and 1960s pop culture with a slideshow of fun and eyebrow-raising vintage ads that capture a Mad Man's world.
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The Sleeper Car | Improv Everywhere

The Sleeper Car | Improv Everywhere | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

The Sleeper Car was produced by Improv Everywhere as part of the Guggenheim Museum exhibition stillspotting nyc.

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‘Mad Men’ Goes Back to the Office - How accurate is the portrayal of the 60s

‘Mad Men’ Goes Back to the Office - How accurate is the portrayal of the 60s | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Did they really smoke that much? A Newsweek secretary-turned-Washington correspondent says the on-screen sexism, drinking, and smoking capture the office culture of the early ’60s.

 

Eleanor Clift:

 

"Critics have assailed the way everybody on the show smokes, glorifying a nasty habit that carries significant health risks. But that’s the way it was then."

 

"When Draper, the agency’s creative director and Mad Men’s protagonist, comes up with the tagline “It’s toasted” for Lucky Strike, he’s told that all brands are toasted. Without missing a beat he says, “Everybody else’s tobacco is poisonous. Lucky Strike’s is toasted.” The remark illustrates the central theme of Mad Men, the making and selling of the American Dream by Madison Avenue in the early ’60s—before civil rights, feminism, and antiwar protests forced a great awakening on the ruling class."

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Ralph Nader Interview -- page 3 / 7 -- Academy of Achievement

Ralph Nader Interview -- page 3 / 7 -- Academy of Achievement | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"Ralph Nader: It was all but the proverbial knapsack. I hitchhiked to Washington with one suitcase. I stayed overnight for three nights in the YMCA and then got a room in a boarding house. The plan simply was to build enough power in Washington, by getting to the media on the issue, columnists, getting to members of Congress to start Congressional hearings to regulate the auto industry for safety. To say to the auto companies -- who were wallowing in stylistic pornography over engineering integrity -- those were the periods of real stagnation that was being watched very carefully by some people in Japan and western Europe - to get them moving. To push them to produce better, safer cars. So it was a conscious effort..."

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Ralph Nader - Not For Sale

Ralph Nader - Not For Sale | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"Ralph Nader, a towering 6 feet, 4 inches, is soft-spoken, but he's as intense as any politician. The founder of modern consumerism, he remains a full-time activist at age 61. In addition to heading the Center for Study of Responsive Law, a few blocks up 16th Street from the White House, he reads, speaks, writes and travels nonstop."He's had an enormous influence historically," says Steve Brobeck, a consumer historian and director of the Consumer Federation of America. As the crusader who built his David-and- Goliath career taking on major corporations — automobiles, airlines, insurance — Nader is accustomed to being simultaneously loved and maligned.

"You know what he's done for us? He has raised our expectations," says Nader protege Harvey Rosenfield, head of California's Proposition 103 Enforcement Project. "People trust that man because they know he's not for sale."

Nader began to earn that reputation 30 years ago, when he was catapulted into the national spotlight as a young Harvard law graduate whose stinging book Unsafe at Any Speed challenged the safety of the Chevrolet Corvair and American cars in general..."

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[U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry addressing press conference at the release of the 1964 Report on Smoking and Health] (1964)

[U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry addressing press conference at the release of the 1964 Report on Smoking and Health] (1964) | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
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You've Come a Long Way Baby Virginia Slims "Tailored for the feminine hand- Slimmer than the fat cigarettes men smoke."

"Tailored for the feminine hand- Slimmer than the fat cigarettes men smoke."

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The Outrageously Sexist Ads Of The Mad Men Era That Some Companies Wish We'd Forget

The Outrageously Sexist Ads Of The Mad Men Era That Some Companies Wish We'd Forget | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Which company used this tagline: "Is it always illegal to kill a woman?
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"Want him to be more of a man? Try being more of a woman." - Found in Mom's Basement

"Want him to be more of a man? Try being more of a woman." - Found in Mom's Basement | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
1974 ad for Emeraude fragrance from Coty.
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Take It Off, Take It All Off - 1967- Noxzema

Swedish model Gunilla Knutson asked men to "take it off, take it all off."

William Esty Advertising created the provocative ad -an attractive eighteen-year-old Swedish blonde model teasingly urged men to "Take it off, take it all off" with Noxzema Medicated Instant Shave Cream. The pop hit "The Stripper" plays in the background, showing a man shaving off Noxzema shaving cream in neat, clean rows as the blonde said "Take it off. take it all off!" and "The closer you shave the more you need Noxzema." At the end she caresses a can of Noxzema and then the cheeks of the man. Later fifteen similar spots included contemporary sports figures.

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Why Madison Avenue Is Boycotting AMC's Reality Show 'The Pitch'

Why Madison Avenue Is Boycotting AMC's Reality Show 'The Pitch' | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Plus: a guide to the contenders who said "yes."...

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Mad Men Tech: 9 Devices That Changed the 1960s Office

Mad Men Tech: 9 Devices That Changed the 1960s Office | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
In anticipation of Mad Men's March 25 season five premiere (it's about time), we've examined the show's '60s-era technology.
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For New ‘Mad Men’ Season, Magazine ‘Retro-fies’ Ads - DesignTAXI.com

For New ‘Mad Men’ Season, Magazine ‘Retro-fies’ Ads - DesignTAXI.com | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
For New ‘Mad Men’ Season, Magazine ‘Retro-fies’ Ads - DesignTAXI.com...

"For this week’s Mad Men cover story issue, the (online and print) edition contains vintage, swinging ‘60s-style cover design, layouts and ads.

Ads of brands, such as Mercedes-Benz, British Airways, United Colors of Benetton, Dunkin Donuts and Estée Lauder, were either re-appropriated to suit the issue or replaced by authentic period ads from the era.

Viewers can also vote for their favourite ads on the publication’s website.

The old school ‘Mad Men’ edition of the magazine, will be available on newsstands and iPads on Monday.

“We've literally taken a page from Newsweek’s past—recreating the sleek, iconic look of the magazine during the swinging ‘60s, but with all original content. Imagining what a Newsweek website would have looked like, without dropping a tab of acid, was no easy feat. But with a leap of faith (and a single martini), we created an online edition that Don Draper would have toasted. We hope you do too.” Newsweek wrote on its website.

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The 60s Reality Behind ‘Mad Men’

The 60s Reality Behind ‘Mad Men’ | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
From the first spacewalk to Governor Ronald Reagan to Brigitte Bardot, Newsweek takes you behind the stories that shaped Don Draper’s world.
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George Carlin talks about advertising

George Carlin talks about advertising and honesty on his show from HBO in year 1999.  HBO.

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