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A Cultural History of Advertising
A peek at the past, present and future implications of our consumer culture
Curated by k3hamilton
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Race, Nostalgia, and Our Deep Thirst for Advertising

Race, Nostalgia, and Our Deep Thirst for Advertising | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Hamilton Nolan says, "Advertising is like a shit and sugar pie. So, so sweet, as long as you don't think about what's going into it. And everyone wants a bigger piece. Who are any of us to say that someone should not have more shit and sugar pie?"

 

"As in much of corporate America, "diversity" in advertising means "people who are not white, but who have been to Harvard Business School."

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Mad Men and race: Why Season 5 may finally put the civil rights movement front and center.

Mad Men and race: Why Season 5 may finally put the civil rights movement front and center. | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Tanner Colby reports:

"In everything from their pop-culture references to their meticulous production design, the creators of Mad Men are famously obsessive about the show’s historical accuracy....

"In the early 1950s, BBDO hired Clarence Holte, making him the first black man ever to work at a major New York ad agency. But Holte was retained to serve as a liaison to black newspapers and radio. The color line for blacks to work on “white” advertising wasn’t broken until 1955, when Young & Rubicam hired musician Roy Eaton as a copywriter and composer. In 1960, BBDO also hired graphic designer Georg Olden, a pioneering black creative who’d designed the logo for CBS television and who would go on to be a vice president at McCann-Erickson. A handful of other Jackie Robinson-type figures were making inroads here and there, but for several years that was about it..."

A 1963 Report on 10 largest ad agencies: "Out of over 20,000 employees, the report identified only 25 blacks working in any kind of professional or creative capacity, i.e., nonclerical or custodial."

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