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A Cultural History of Advertising
A peek at the past, present and future implications of our consumer culture
Curated by k3hamilton
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'How Television Benefits Your Children' Ad, 1950 - Retronaut

'How Television Benefits Your Children' Ad, 1950 - Retronaut | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
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SHORE, DINAH - The Museum of Broadcast Communications

SHORE, DINAH - The Museum of Broadcast Communications | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"Dinah Shore ranks as one of the important on-air musical stars of the first two decades of television in the United States. Indeed from 1956 through 1963 there were few more well-known TV personalities. More than any song she sang, Dinah Shore symbolized cheery optimism and southern charm, most remembered for blowing a big kiss to viewers at the end of her 1950s variety show. As hostess, she sometimes danced and frequently participated in comedy skits, but was best loved as a smooth vocalist reminiscent of a style associated with the 1940s."

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April 1939, Television Begins its first Live Public Broadcasts at the New York Worlds Fair.

April 1939, Television Begins its first Live Public Broadcasts at the New York Worlds Fair. | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

1939 New York Worlds Fair, Television is Introduced... with Miss Television X 4

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Digital History- The Vietnam war

Digital History- The Vietnam war | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

The prize-winning photographs are among the most searing and painful images of the Vietnam War era. These images helped define the meaning of the war. They also illustrate the immense power of photography to reveal war's brutality.

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Television History Advertising 1935-1942

Television History Advertising 1935-1942 | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
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MZTV Television formal debut at the World of Tomorrow 1939 World Fair in NY

MZTV Television formal debut at  the World of Tomorrow 1939 World Fair in NY | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Television in the United States made its formal debut at the World's Fair in New York City on Sunday April 30, 1939 with the first Presidential address on Television by Franklin D. Roosevelt. The signal was sent by the Telemobile (RCA's mobile Television van) to the Empire State transmitter and rebroadcast. The New York Times reported the broadcast was received in strategic locations and the pictures were clear and steady.Ten days prior to Roosevelt's speech, David Sarnoff, President of the Radio Corporation of America (RCA), made the dedication speech for the opening of the RCA Pavilion at the New York World's Fair. Staging this event prior to the World's Fair opening ceremonies ensured that RCA would capture its share of the newspaper headlines.

The ceremony was televised, and watched by several hundred viewers on TV receivers inside the RCA Pavilion at the fairgrounds, as well as on receivers installed on the 62nd floor of Radio City in Manhattan.

The RCA Pavilion was designed by the renowned U.S. Modernist architectural firm of Skidmore & Owings. When viewed from the air,It was shaped like a radio tube, attracting much attention since aerial views and models of the fair were immensely popular as they showed visitors the scope of the exhibition. The first sight to be seen inside the entrance of the building (see photo above) was the Phantom Teleceiver, now a prized piece of the MZTV Museum Collection. People were amazed by the quality of the television pictures on this unit. The great majority of visitors had never seen television before, and the set's transparent cabinet removed any doubts in viewer's minds that magic or trickery was involved in obtaining the pictures.

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