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A Cultural History of Advertising
A peek at the past, present and future implications of our consumer culture
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A Skin You Love to Touch -Model Interpretation

A Skin You Love to Touch -Model Interpretation | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"The real breakthrough for Woodbury’s Facial Soap, Lansdowne, and J. Walter Thompson came in 1911, with ads using the slogan “A Skin You Love to Touch.” The phrase appeared over gauzily romantic paintings of elegant young ladies, happily receiving the admiring attention of dashing young gentlemen. (For an example of a Woodbury soap ad, click here.) Mass circulation magazines like the Ladies’ Home Journal ran these ads regularly. Sales soared in the following decade. Tame as it may now seem, several historians of advertising have called the “Skin You Love to Touch” campaign the first to use sex appeal in modern advertising."

 

"...The real breakthrough for Woodbury’s Facial Soap, Lansdowne, and J. Walter Thompson came in 1911, with ads using the slogan “A Skin You Love to Touch.” The phrase appeared over gauzily romantic paintings of elegant young ladies, happily receiving the admiring attention of dashing young gentlemen. (For an example of a Woodbury soap ad, click here.) Mass circulation magazines like the Ladies’ Home Journal ran these ads regularly. Sales soared in the following decade. Tame as it may now seem, several historians of advertising have called the “Skin You Love to Touch” campaign the first to use sex appeal in modern advertising.

 

Helen Lansdowne’s marriage to Stanley Resor, who rose to J. Walter Thompson’s presidency as the agency grew to be the largest in the United States, did not end her advertising career. Nor did she abandon her commitment to women’s success, particularly in the advertising business. She marched in parades for women’s suffrage and consciously set out to provide opportunities for well-educated young women to advance their careers at J. Walter Thompson. These women, who formed a separate Women’s Editorial Department, were exceptionally well-educated, ambitious, and independent-minded. Several of them were active in feminist causes. Helen Lansdowne Resor maintained that she and her female colleagues “supplied the feminine point of view,” but few, if any, lived lives that had much in common with the women they were trying to reach with their campaigns."

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John B. Watson at J. Walter Thompson: the legitimation of science in advertising. | Journal of Advertising | Professional Journal archives from AllBusiness.com

John B. Watson at J. Walter Thompson: the legitimation of science in advertising. | Journal of Advertising | Professional Journal archives from AllBusiness.com | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

This article, a cultural history, attempts to answer the question of how John B. Watson's presence at JWT.

"Watson advised that in order to get the appropriate reaction from the consumer, one had only to "tell him something that will tie him up with fear, something that will stir up a mild rage, that will call out an affectionate or love response, or strike at a deep psychological or habit need." The determination of the "appropriate stimuli" required the use of scientific techniques in the laboratory setting. Only after the consumer reaction was determined in sample populations could an advertiser aim accurately and with deadly execution" (Watson n.d.).


Source: http://www.allbusiness.com/professional-scientific/advertising-related-services/116874-1.html#ixzz1lRSwGIoe

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John Watson- Founder of Behaviorism- JWT Employee- The tabloid story

John Watson- Founder of Behaviorism- JWT Employee- The tabloid story | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Why John Watson ended up working in advertising

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