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A Cultural History of Advertising
A peek at the past, present and future implications of our consumer culture
Curated by k3hamilton
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▶ Alka-Seltzer TV Commercial Plop, plop, fizz, fizz oh what a relief it is Jingle

60s TV commercial with Speedy singing the Alka-Seltzer song. Plop plop, fizz fizz, oh what a relief it is!
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10 Terrible Vintage PSAs That Should Stay in the Past

10 Terrible Vintage PSAs That Should Stay in the Past | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
After watching these awful PSAs from the 1950s, you'll be happy those days are long gone.
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1954 Mars Bar- Great for that hole in your head

1954 Mars Bar- Great for that hole in your head | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
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Burning for You - iconic Zippo

Burning for You - iconic Zippo | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Zippo has been an iconic American brand—but these days, it's lighting campfires
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'Anger Boiled Up, and Betty Friedan Was There': 'Feminine Mystique' at 50

'Anger Boiled Up, and Betty Friedan Was There': 'Feminine Mystique' at 50 | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
An interview with Gail Collins about the groundbreaking feminist book

"Later, women who devoted their lives to the domestic arts didn't get the respect that the farm wife had gotten because they had no economic role. That's when they came up with a vision of the "total" woman, the woman celebrated in women's magazines, the middle-class woman, the moral compass. Men were in the marketplace and no longer had time to be moral compasses. This job was elevated emotionally but didn't have any economic point, so there was a loss of power and respect in a country where the economic role is everything. Betty Friedan was born into this era, in which women still had all those issues, but being a housewife, which used to be exhausting, wasn't all that hard anymore. Raising children was hard but only lasted for a short chunk of a woman's life. Friedan wasn't only a housewife—she was a freelance writer and had other roles. But her complaints about that one role, the power of her own rage and dissatisfaction seemed to resonate amazingly....

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Betsy Wetsy Doll Commercial by Ideal: Vintage Toys & Games for Christmas 1950s

k3hamilton's insight:

" Ask your mommy to buy you Betsy Wetsy"

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gladwell true colors Shirley Polykoff Does She or Doesn't She

gladwell true colors Shirley Polykoff Does She or Doesn't She | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"Hair dye and the hidden history of postwar America.

During the Depression-long before she became one of the most famous copywriters of her day-Shirley Polykoff met a man named George Halperin. He was the son of an Orthodox rabbi from Reading, Pennsylvania, and soon after they began courting he took her home for Passover to meet his family. They ate roast chicken, tzimmes, and sponge cake, and Polykoff hit it off with Rabbi Halperin, who was warm and funny. George's mother was another story. She was Old World Orthodox, with severe, tightly pulled back hair; no one was good enough for her son....

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How a Clean, Tidy Home Can Help You Survive the Atomic Bomb: A Cold War Film from 1954

How a Clean, Tidy Home Can Help You Survive the Atomic Bomb: A Cold War Film from 1954 | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Last week, we revisited some Cold War propaganda that taught upstanding American citizens How to Spot a Communist Using Literary Criticism. It's a gem, but it has nothing on the 1954 film, The House in the Middle.
k3hamilton's insight:

well, there goes my house

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Weight Gain Ads from 1940s-1970s: Back When Curvy was the Norm!

Weight Gain Ads from 1940s-1970s: Back When Curvy was the Norm! | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Skinny was definitely NOT in back in the 1940s to 1970s. Don't believe us? Just check out these interesting and rather comical weight gain ads from those decades. One particular ad even stated that
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That time Mickey Mouse was a Drug Dealer

That time Mickey Mouse was a Drug Dealer | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
In the 1950s, non-medical use of stimulant and sedative drugs was widely accepted and promoted in the mainstream media– so widely in fact that they even made it into a children’s Walt Disney 1951 comic book starring Mickey Mouse as a speed dealer...
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Melissa San lopes's curator insight, December 8, 2013 5:33 PM

On aura tout vu !

Fausto Bonifacio's comment, December 14, 2013 2:39 PM
This cant be comment :D I love Miky!
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The Sound of a Zippo: Remembering How I killed a Zippo

The Sound of a Zippo: Remembering How I killed a Zippo | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"It was a sound I hadn't heard for at least a decade, and there it was suddenly out of context bringing back all sorts of strange and odd feelings just as I was setting up my computer preparing to start my class. And appropriately so, the class was Soap, Sex, and Cigarettes: A Cultural History of Advertising. This truly was a cultural moment, for me anyhow.

Here this sound -so familiar, so distinct and so loaded with meaning and memory good and bad starts...flick, flick, flick flick. Where was it coming from?......

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Zippo ad-1952 --kids hide them behind their backs as surprise gifts for mom & dad

Zippo ad-1952 --kids hide them behind their backs as surprise gifts for mom & dad | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Eavesdrop at the heart of a man and you'll hear his pulse beat Zip-po...Zop-po...Zip-po

That's because he wants you to give hum something he'll keep, and use, for years and years. Even if he lives to be a hundred, he'll never stop using and treasuring a trusty Zippo.

k3hamilton's insight:

well, I bet dad won't be living to a hundred! and little Johnny might find his bottom on fire

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Design for Dreaming (1956) | The Public Domain Review

Design for Dreaming (1956) | The Public Domain Review | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Over the top 1950s Populuxe advertisement for General Motors, set at their 1956 Motors Motorama. A woman falls asleep and dreams of a glorious future...
k3hamilton's insight:

download the film here http://archive.org/details/Designfo1956

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1950's Decoder Ring TV Commercial

Captain Midnight and the Secret Squadron. Classic fare from the 50's.

k3hamilton's insight:

getting kids hooked in the 50s...just drink lots of ovaltine-it helps you be a leader...oh yeah

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20 Bad Vintage Christmas Ads

20 Bad Vintage Christmas Ads | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Vintage ads are often terrible, but these holiday ads take terrible to a new low. Whether it's Santa as a sex object or a cigarette carton for a sleigh, these ads are festive, fun, and totally inappropriate.
k3hamilton's insight:

Yup..they're bad, bad, bad

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Merry Christmas from Lucky Strike Cigarettes! ... It's Toasted! 1950s

 

k3hamilton's insight:

"It says Merry Christmas and Happy Smoking 200 Times"

 

When people gave Cigarettes for Christmas.

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Pepsi Ads, 1950s - Retronaut

Pepsi Ads, 1950s - Retronaut | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

The fine art of Staying Lovely..oh it's because of Pepsi

Aren't today's People wonderful?

Such fun to be with

The Sociables prefer Pepsi

Picture of Poise

Modern refreshment is Lght Refreshment

 

oh the headlines!

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Women as bosses (Fortune, 1956) - Fortune Features

Women as bosses (Fortune, 1956) - Fortune Features | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

 Fortune.com publishes a favorite story from our magazine archives.

 

selected quotes from 1956 article:

 

"And when one woman does a good job in a corporation that has been skeptical about women, promotion comes a little easier for the next woman.Some companies are beginning to allow women to take their management-training courses"

 

"But women's progress in the professions is mixed. While the total number of women in the professional group has risen substantially, the ratio of women professionals to men professionals, and to all women workers, actually has declined a little."

 

Equal but special

"The "special" qualities of female executives have been subjected to examination by Social Research, Inc., of Chicago. In a study of sixty successful women, it was found that their common attributes were day-to-day practicality ("somewhat greater than a random sampling of men"), organizational skill, sensitivity to people, and adaptability ("much more than a run of successful men, they show a flair for moving with the situation . . . for changing when they find a particular approach unrewarding"). They also had unusual energy and confidence, and they took pleasure in achievement."

 

Attiudes that women were up against:

 

Westinghouse, Pittsburgh: "We look for women to get more and more into everything, especially in consumers' specialties, where they could be really helpful."

 

National Steel Corp., Pittsburgh: "Women are found just where you'd expect to find them, as heads of stenographic departments and the like. Steel is traditionally a man's game. We never gave women much thought."

Ruth Fair, president of R. Fair Co., Dallas designer and manufacturer of women's sportswear: "Few women are in top executive jobs because it's too tough."

 

Annette Ducheon, vice president of Spartan Mills, Spartanburg, South Carolina: "I definitely think women can get top executive jobs if they want them, but comparatively few have made the decision in their own minds that they want to take on that kind of career."

 

An executive of a Detroit automobile company: "Women aren't able to stand up to the stress and strain of the business."

 

An executive of another Detroit automobile company : "Women are not top executives because they are not interested enough in the business to devote thirty years to working their way up through the ranks."

 

Mrs. Lee Worthington, secretary and advertising director of Tranter Manufacturing Co. (refrigeration and heating), Lansing, Michigan: "I run across many young women with the ability to get ahead, but they refuse the responsibility that is offered to them."

 

Lillian G. Madden, president of Falls City Brewing Co., Louisville: "I've found that men are very fair. In many cases women aren't willing to make the sacrifices necessary to work up. They just won't stick it out like a man."

 

Margaret Divver, advertising manager of John Hancock Mutual Life, Boston: "Progress depends largely on the initiative of the individual woman--with a willingness to make a sacrifice. Women just don't want to pay the price."

 

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