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A Cultural History of Advertising
A peek at the past, present and future implications of our consumer culture
Curated by k3hamilton
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The day the Muzak died | Toronto Star

The day the Muzak died | Toronto Star | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Ontario-based Mood Media folds long-standing label.

Mark Feb. 5, 2013, as the day the Muzak died.

Concord, Ont.-based Mood Media announced Tuesday it was pulling labels Muzak — for decades, synonymous in pop culture with “elevator music” — and DMX into one company, simply called Mood.

That’s not to say that the days of easy listening rock remixes at the dentist’s office or classical music in the elevator are over. Mood will still provide music to businesses. It just won’t be Muzak anymore.....

In its early days, Muzak, a brand stamped in 1934, provided innocuous background music for stores, restaurants and, of course, elevators."

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1936-You'd Be Surprised How Many Of Our "Best People" Have "B.O." And Don't Know It!

1936-You'd Be Surprised How Many Of Our "Best People" Have "B.O." And Don't Know It! | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Collection: Ad*Access
k3hamilton's insight:

we stink..and Mitzi is telling us

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1937 Plymouth Cars - Chrysler Corporation Advertising Commercial

Chrysler presents the 1937 Plymouth motor cars. All the latest engineering advances in the car, such as hydraulic brakes are shown.
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Sky Billboards (1935) - Advertising by Sky Writing

Chevrolet take to the air to create a sky writing advertisement, and in the process this educational film explains how the planes pilot creates the words, an...
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Cellophane Ads c.1930s-1950s The best things in life come in cellophane-even babies

Cellophane Ads c.1930s-1950s The best things in life come in cellophane-even babies | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
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Playing With Matches: Sexy, Silly 1930s Ads That Went Up in Smoke By Lisa Hix

Playing With Matches: Sexy, Silly 1930s Ads That Went Up in Smoke By Lisa Hix | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Smoking is growing more taboo in the United States now, but back in the 1930s, cigarettes were sexy. And where there was smoke, there were matches. At one point, nearly every business in the country, whether it was a national chain or a local Mom ‘n’ Pop, produced logoed matchbooks to help their customers fuel their nicotine habit—now known to be a deadly addiction.....

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“The book reader of the future”, 1935 Move over ipad!

“The book reader of the future”, 1935 Move over ipad! | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
...Source: Paleofuture via BitRebels  Thank you to Paleofuture...
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Betty Boop Cartoon Laughing gas 1934

Laughing Gas!HaHaHa...
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one design era > american streamlined design 1930s

one design era > american streamlined design 1930s | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Futuristic and cosmic design of streamlining in the 30s. Great examples here!

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Alexey Brodovitch - Modernist Design in the 30's comes to America

Alexey Brodovitch - Modernist Design in the 30's comes to America | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"Bodovitch was one of the pioneers to bring modernist ideas to America.*
Design of the early thirties was conservative and lacked of radical experiments. This could be explained by the economic situation after the Wall street crash in 1929. Many companies felt the need to show stability and used trusted methods in their advertisement design....

As expected his work didn't go unnoticed in America. The photographer Ralph Steiner who worked for Harper's Bazaar, recognized the potential of Brodovitch as a designer. He introduced him to Carmel Snow, editor-in-chief of the magazine whom immediately offered him a job....Brodovitch created a harmonious and meaningful whole using avant-garde photography, typography and illustration. After being hired he asked several old friends like Man Ray, Jean Cocteau, Raoul Dufy, Marc Chagall and A.M. Cassandre to work for the magazine. Cassandre created several of the Bazaar covers between 1937 and 1940.
Brodovitch was the first art director to integrate image and text. Most american magazines at that time used text and illustration seperately, dividing them by wide white margins...'

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Erte Museum Harpers Bazaar Covers Art Deco in the 20s-30s

Erte Museum Harpers Bazaar Covers Art Deco in the 20s-30s | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
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A Gullible Nation? War of the Worlds Revisited

A Gullible Nation? War of the Worlds Revisited | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Orson Welles' broadcast of War of the Worlds panicked a nation. Let's explore the night in question and find out why.
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Just Plain Bill Episode 3 of early Soap Opera Radio 1932 : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

Just Plain Bill Episode 3 of early Soap Opera Radio 1932 : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"Just Plain Bill"

Old Time Radio's 23-year long run of 15-30 minute situation comedy, "

Just Plain Bill," premiered at 6:45 p.m. Eastern Time, Sept. 19, 1932,on CBS Radio and stayed in this time-slot until June 16, 1933.

 

The show ran until Sept. 30, 1955

 

Soap Opera creator King & Queen team, Frank & Anne Hummert, were inspired to write a soap opera surrounding the life of a small-town barber.

 

Bill Davidson, a good-natured, soft-spoken, homespun country philosopher, sensitive to needs of friends & relatives, offered level-headed advice to help them straighten out their tangled lives. Bill's listeners identified with him, because he was just like them, as noted in program opening line.

Bill had a wise mind, huge heart and his arms were always open for arising problems within his circle of friends & family.

These dramas frequently revolved around his tiny family: daughter, Nancy Donovan; her lawyer-husband, Kerry Donovan; and Bill's grandson, Wiki Donovan.

 

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1932-Bend down sister...it's good for the complexion

1932-Bend down sister...it's good for the complexion | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Collection: Ad*Access. Ad offers advice from a beauty expert named Julia Foster.
k3hamilton's insight:

e-gads!

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1938 A Wife Can Blame Herself If She Loses Love By Getting "Middle-Age" Skin!

1938 A Wife Can Blame Herself If She Loses Love By Getting "Middle-Age" Skin! | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Collection: Ad*Access
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"We Want Beer" Parade 1932 labor protest of prohibition- Retronaut

"We Want Beer" Parade 1932 labor protest of prohibition- Retronaut | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Labor union members marching through Broad Street, Newark New Jersey, carrying signs reading "We want beer" in protest of prohibition]

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The beginning of Commercial Radio

The start of commercial radio in the USA. Taken from the film 'Empire of the Air'.
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Burning cigarette dispenser, 1931

Burning cigarette dispenser, 1931 | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
...Source: Modern Mechanix...
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Orson Welles- War of the Worlds-Hypodermic Theory Audience Response

Orson Wells terrified all of America in 1938 with his Halloween radio play of War Of The Worlds. Even though he was well known for his radio theatre, people ...
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1932 Unemployed line up for food at Yonge St Mission, Toronto

1932 Unemployed line up for food at Yonge St Mission, Toronto | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"Free Breakfast for Men"

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In My Merry Oldsmobile (1932) Explore the relationship between women and men in the 30s

This Fleischer Studios sing-along cartoon contains a surprising amount of immodest imagery. Lovely "Lucille" is menaced by a mustachioed villain/voyeur but t...
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WGBH American Experience . Streamliners: America's Lost Trains | PBS

WGBH American Experience . Streamliners: America's Lost Trains | PBS | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
Biography: Industrial Designers and Streamliners...

1930s

"As the country struggled to emerge from its economic slump, Americans were captivated by the streamlined look. "Streamlined trains," wrote one historian, "stimulated public faith in a future fueled by technological innovation." Railroads paved the way for streamlining in the auto industry. Trucks, buses, and of course airplanes followed suit. It wasn't only large machines that were streamlined. Pencil sharpeners, ball-point pens, and kitchen mixers, which had no reason to be aerodynamic, took on the look."

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Contributors: M. F. Agha Design in 30s and 40s

Dr. Leslie and the Composing Room.
1934 - 1942 An Important time in the Development of American Graphic Design.
An MFA Thesis Project Written and Designed by Erin K Malone.

"M.F. Agha was educated in Kiev and Paris. After working for Vogue in Berlin he was brought to the US in 1929 by publisher Condé Nast. Agha proved himself with Vogue magazine by showing that the art director was an integral part of the editorial process and was soon given the art directorship of Vanity Fair and House and Garden as well. He was a pioneer with the use of sans serif typefaces, duotones, full color photographs and bleed images. Agha led the field in the use of leading photographers of his day. Edward Steichen, Cecil Beaton, Edward Weston, Louise Dahl-Wolfe and many others. He also brought his readers the works of Masters like Matisse, Derain and Picasso years before other American magazines. He left Condé Nast Publications in 1943 (after Nast died) and became a successful freelance consultant. He served as President of the AIGA from 1953-1955 and was awarded the AIGA Gold medal in 1957. His contributions to the field of magazine publishing changed the nature of magazine design and redefined the role of the designer and art director. "Issues:
August-September 1939

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Advertising Slogans of the 1930s

Advertising Slogans of the 1930s | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
A study of advertising slogans during the Great Depression.
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War of the Worlds -A little history of Oct 30, 1938 The new power of mass media

War of the Worlds -A little history of Oct 30, 1938 The new power of mass media | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

"It is perhaps a comment on the idiocy of human beings that one of the biggest hoaxes to panic the American public began with the following words:"The Columbia Broadcasting System and its affiliated stations present Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre on the Air in a radio play by Howard Koch suggested by the H.G. Wells novel 'The War of the Worlds.'"

On the face of it, this seems like a pretty straightforward concept. It's a radio play, based on a novel, featuring one of the most recognized voices in the history of radio.

AND IT WAS THE DAY BEFORE HALLOWEEN!"

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Laura Brown's comment, June 25, 2013 5:59 PM
You've got a liiiiittle typo in the title.
k3hamilton's comment, June 25, 2013 9:31 PM
Thanks!