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A Cultural History of Advertising
A peek at the past, present and future implications of our consumer culture
Curated by k3hamilton
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11 Bizarre and Dangerous Items Sold by Sears in 1902

11 Bizarre and Dangerous Items Sold by Sears in 1902 | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Arsenic Complection Wafers. Toilet Mask, Magic Flesh Builder,  Spirits of Turpentine to drink, Opium ...

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yum

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Phoebe Snow Campaign 1900-1917

Phoebe Snow Campaign 1900-1917 | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Phoebe Snow existed as a advertising campaign 50 years before the named train began service.  It was a landmark in advertising.  The colorful prints and clever jingles were as well known as modern era commercials - but with only the print media and billboards to present the concept.  There were dozens of different jingles and ads that appeared from 1900 until 1917, when the DL&W stopped burning Anthracite. 

After 1917, the name was used sparingly.  Phoebe was re-born when the Lackawanna started running Electric Service from Hoboken.  Finally, in 1949, Phoebe finally got her train, as the replacement for the Lackawanna Limited.   At the same time, rolling stock began to get the Phoebe Snow name as well.

 

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Mary Phelps Jacob 1913 invents the modern brassiere

Mary Phelps Jacob 1913 invents the modern brassiere | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it

Mary Phelps Jacob After decades of stuffing themselves into seemingly barbaric undergarments of a mostly corset-like nature, women around the world finally began to get fed up. In 1913, a New York socialite decided to do something about it: the first modern brassiere was created by Mary Phelps Jacob. She patented her design, and now the brassiere is a standard part of nearly every modern woman's wardrobe.

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1908 Kellogg's Corn Flakes

1908 Kellogg's Corn Flakes | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
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yikes---well it does come from Battle Creek

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A New View of the Invisible Woman: Christine Frederick starts the League of Advertising Women 1912

A New View of the Invisible Woman: Christine Frederick starts the League of Advertising Women 1912 | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
The University of Georgia Research Magazine

 

"Children were expected to be seen, not heard, as America turned the corner into the 20th century. Women weren't even seen -- at least not at meetings of the New York Advertising Club.

In fact, Christine Frederick, a consulting editor for the Ladies Home Journal, was told she could only sit "in the box behind the curtains" when she asked to attend a 1912 meeting of the men-only group.

Such an incident might seem odd considering the importance of the Home Journal and its readers to the burgeoning consumer products industry.

But the attitude prevailed, and it sparked Frederick to enlist the aid of her husband, J. George, also a journalist and a member of the men's advertising club, to create an advertising club specifically for women.

At the Fredericks' invitation about forty women in advertising met at a fashionable New York restaurant in March 1912 to form the League of Advertising Women of New York, the first U.S. professional association for women of its kind..."

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Patent Medicine Trade Cards, c.1900

Patent Medicine Trade Cards, c.1900 | A Cultural History of Advertising | Scoop.it
...Thank you to UCLA Library...
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