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8th Grade Science Finds
Informational texts, videos and more to extend, explain or add literacy skills to current curriculum
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Los Alamos National Laboratory: Chemical properties of atoms

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Chemical properties of atoms | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it

S.08.PS.02a Describe how the structure of an atom is reflected in the periodic table of elements.

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Periodic Table of Elements: Los Alamos National Laboratory

Periodic Table of Elements: Los Alamos National Laboratory | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
The Chemistry Division's Periodic Table describes the history, properties, resources, uses, isotopes, forms, costs, and other information for each element.

 

Clickable links for each element, plus links to "Characterizing the elements" "Chemical properties" and "about the periodic table."

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Science360 - The Knowledge Network

Science360 - The Knowledge Network | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
Science360 Knowledge Network immerses visitors in the latest wonders of science, engineering, technology and math.

 

Source for Science videos

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Boasting about the boson | The Why Files

Boasting about the boson | The Why Files | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
Yes, but… is the word from the frontiers of physics. The world's largest atom smasher has blasted protons against each other with such enormous energy that they have -- apparently -- appeared in the debris of decaying particles.
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Brian Cox on CERN's supercollider

Brian Cox on CERN's supercollider | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
"Rock-star physicist" Brian Cox talks about his work on the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Discussing the biggest of big science in an engaging, accessible way, Cox brings us along on a tour of the massive project.
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Quantum Theory Timeline

Quantum Theory Timeline | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it

From ParticleAdventure.org: history of discoveries related to fundamental particles in nature.

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A front-row seat at this summer's physics extravaganza - MIT News Office

A front-row seat at this summer's physics extravaganza - MIT News Office | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
MIT team taking part in quest to find elusive Higgs boson...

 

Largest Particle Accelerator in the world in Switzerland and what MIT scientists hope to learn from it by colliding protons. 

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The Abstract :: North Carolina State University :: The Chemistry of Fireworks

The Abstract :: North Carolina State University :: The Chemistry of Fireworks | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it


Article for 8th grade Science: electrons, elements

 

Metal salts and how they create color when heated. Different metal salts produce different colors.

 

Easy one to add a video to, as well!

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Inquiring Minds: Neutrino physics at Fermilab

Inquiring Minds: Neutrino physics at Fermilab | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it

The subatomic particles called neutrinos are among the most elusive in the particle kingdom. Scientists have built detectors underground, underwater, and at the South Pole to measure these ghostly particles that come from the sun, from supernovae and from many other celestial objects. Neutrinos fill the whole universe, with about 10 million of them per cubic foot, and most of them zip straight through the earth, and through particle detectors, without leaving a trace. Because they almost never interact with matter, only sophisticated experiments can catch and measure the properties of neutrinos.

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What's a Neutrino?

UCI (Univ. of California, Irvine)

 

Descriptions of three types of neutrinos which are known and a history of the discovery of neutrinos.

 

Readability: good for someone in middle school who is interested in finding out more about fundamental particles. Doesn't require a lot of background knowledge to understand, but writing is for the "extends" student. 

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Calculate the Top Quark Mass

Fermi Lab provides real data from the collision of a proton and antiproton which resulted in the creation of two top quarks. The data can be used by students (really smart ones!) to analyze the collisions and figure out the mass of the top quarks. 

 

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NASA Finds First Planets Around Sun-Like Stars in Crowded Star Cluster

NASA Finds First Planets Around Sun-Like Stars in Crowded Star Cluster | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
NASA-funded astronomers have, for the first time, spotted planets orbiting sun-like stars in a crowded cluster of stars. The findings offer the best evidence yet planets can sprout up in dense stellar environments. Although the newfound planets are not habitable, their skies would be starrier than what we see from Earth.

 

The starry-skied planets are two so-called hot Jupiters, which are massive, gaseous orbs that are boiling hot because they orbit tightly around their parent stars. Each hot Jupiter circles a different sun-like star in the Beehive Cluster, also called the Praesepe, a collection of roughly 1,000 stars that appear to be swarming around a common center.

 

The Beehive is an open cluster, or a grouping of stars born at about the same time and out of the same giant cloud of material. As such, the stars share a similar chemical composition. Unlike the majority of stars, which spread out shortly after birth, these young stars remain loosely bound together by mutual gravitational attraction.

 

S.08.PS.07a Compare and contrast the Sun, as a star, with other objects in the galaxy.
S.08.PS.07d Identify the Characteristics of Stars
S.08.PS.07e Identify the Characteristics of Galaxies


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Friedman explains role of quarks, in Killian talk - MIT News Office

MIT News: readable!

 

This article helps students understand the characteristics of quarks in sophisticated but understandable language. Good extention text for students who understand atoms and want to go farther.

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2012 Nobel Prize in Physics for Measuring and Manipulating Individual Quantum Systems

2012 Nobel Prize in Physics for Measuring and Manipulating Individual Quantum Systems | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has decided to award the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2012 to Serge Haroche, Collège de France and Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, France and David J. Wineland, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and University of Colorado Boulder, CO, USA ”for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems.”

 

Quantum mechanics, the study of how matter interacts with energy at the scale of atoms, has profoundly changed how scientists view the universe. On the quantum scale, matter and energy behave in ways that seem nonsensical and radically different from the world we ordinarily experience. Once exclusively in the realm of theory and thought experiments, quantum mechanics has emerged as the foundation of new scientific investigation, with intriguing possibilities for future technology and innovation.

 

This year’s laureates opened the door to experimentation and manipulation by studying individual quantum particles without destroying them; measured and controlled quantum states, once beyond the reach of direct observation; and took the first steps toward harnessing quantum mechanics, which is already at work in highly accurate atomic clocks and may fulfill the promise of quantum computers that – rather than relying on zeros and ones – will use fuzzy quantum states to conduct calculations many times faster than the most powerful computers today.

 

“This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics shines light on two ground-breaking advances in quantum physics,” said Dr. H. Frederick Dylla, executive director and CEO, American Institute of Physics. “By measuring and manipulating both light and individual atoms, these researchers have opened the door for new investigations into the previously enigmatic and unwieldy world of quantum particles, where matter behaves in ways that are quite different from what we see in classical physics. We are beginning to harness the incredible power of quantum physics to advance technology, computers, timekeeping, cryptography, and many other innovations that have yet to be imagined.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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How Atoms Bond: Ionic Bonds

How Atoms Bond: Ionic Bonds | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
How do atoms bond to form molecules? We use common table salt to show what happens between the electrons and nuclei in atoms of sodium and atoms of chlorine to bond them together into crystals of sodium chloride (NaCl).

 

Nice video which simply explains the basics of electrons, protons, positive & negative charges. The speaker adds some mnemonic devices to help us remember the facts and vocab. A quiz highlight the most important points, too. Probably would require a couple of viewings to remember all of the facts. Flipped classroom idea?

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Chalk Talk: Large Hadron Collider

Chalk Talk: Large Hadron Collider | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it

The LHC will help answer some of the fundamental open questions in physics such as the structure of space and time.

 

Just a really simple animated video showing a super collider in action and answering why folks would bother using one at all.

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Electric Vocabulary

Electric Vocabulary | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
We all know the words around electricity -- “charge,” “positive,” “battery” and more. But where do they come from and what do they really mean? Let the history of these words illuminate the physics of electric phenomena.
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Just How Small Is an Atom?

Just How Small Is an Atom? | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
Just how small are atoms? And what's inside them? The answers turn out to be astounding, even for those who think they know. This fast-paced animation uses spectacular metaphors (imagine a blueberry the size of a football stadium!
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Tools of the Trade: The Pendulum That Detects Extra Dimensions | Physics & Math | DISCOVER Magazine

Tools of the Trade: The Pendulum That Detects Extra Dimensions | Physics & Math | DISCOVER Magazine | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
Why is gravity so pathetically weak compared to other forces? An elaborate version of a very simple device may reveal the answer. Visit Discover Magazine to read this article and other exclusive science and technology news stories.
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Inquiring Minds: the Science of Matter, Space & Time

Inquiring Minds: the Science of Matter, Space & Time | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered how often you could split a grain of sand into smaller pieces? Have you asked yourself what the sky is made of? Perhaps you have dreamed of traveling backwards in time?

 

Physicists are as curious as you are. They look for answers to questions that people have pondered since they first began to wonder about the world and their place within it. It often seems that for every answer physicists find, two new questions arise.

 

Video link included

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Searching for the Building Blocks of Matter

Multi-page picture-and-text Fermilab describing the fundamental particles and their characteristics and discovery. Good for basic information and to develop interest. Use the side arrows to advance or go back. Not fancy, but information filled.

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The Particle "Zoo"

Charts from UCI (Univ. of California, Irvine)

 

Symbols and names of Matter Particles (quarks, leptons) and Force Particles (photon, gluon, bosons, etc). Also includes characteristics of force particles.

 

Continue to advance from page to page (at the bottom) and then check links at left sidebar for more information.

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Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it

If the "extends" students follow each of the links on the timeline page, they'll get to the Nobel Prize site -- first for basic definitions of each of the items, and then (through the links with the scientists' names) they can find descriptions of the scientists and their Nobel Lectures which describe the experiments and discoveries which were made.

 

These lectures are written at a very sophisticated level. Kids at TG would probably have to skip much of the math and focus on the stuff that was done (p. 640-following). These are tough. Here's an example: http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1990/taylor-lecture.pdf

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A front-row seat at this summer's physics extravaganza - MIT News Office

A front-row seat at this summer's physics extravaganza - MIT News Office | 8th Grade Science Finds | Scoop.it
MIT team taking part in quest to find elusive Higgs boson...

 

An article describing the particle accelerator opened in 2008 and what knowledge they hope to gain from using it.

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The Particle Adventure

Interactive activities available through the Contemporary Physics Education Project: accelerators, fundamental particles, classroom activities, etc.

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