7th grade history Rome
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Roman Gladiator's Gravestone Describes Fatal Foul | Ancient Rome & Gladiators | LiveScience

Roman Gladiator's Gravestone Describes Fatal Foul | Ancient Rome & Gladiators | LiveScience | 7th grade history Rome | Scoop.it

An enigmatic message on a Roman gladiator's 1,800-year-old tombstone has finally been decoded, telling a treacherous tale.


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Exploring the history of catacombs -bbc.com

Exploring the history of catacombs -bbc.com | 7th grade history Rome | Scoop.it

Beneath the city streets that travellers walk on each day, dark labyrinths of underground catacombs are passageways to the past, to a time when the ghostly tunnels served as burial grounds for millions of people.
The catacombs of Rome, which date back to the 1st Century and were among the first ever built, were constructed as underground tombs, first by Jewish communities and then by Christian communities. There are only six known Jewish catacombs and around 40 or more Christian catacombs.
In Ancient Rome, it was not permitted for bodies to be buried within the city walls. So while pagans cremated their dead, Christians, who were not legally allowed to practice their religion, turned to underground cemeteries, built beneath land owned by the city’s few rich Christian families. The Jewish population was already implementing this practice when Christians began doing so around the 2nd Century.
The use of catacombs in Rome expanded during the 2nd and 3rd Centuries, as the illegal religion of Christianity grew in popularity. Some areas of the tunnels even became shrines for martyrs buried there. But after Christianity was legalized in 313 AD, funerals moved above ground, and by the 5th Century, the use of catacombs as grave sites dwindled, though they were still revered as sacred sites where pilgrims would come to worship.
The Rome catacombs then fell victim to pillaging by Germanic invaders around the early 9th Century. As a result, relics of Christian martyrs and saints were moved from the catacombs to churches in the city centre. Eventually, the underground burial tunnels were abandoned altogether – only to be rediscovered via excavations in the 1600s.
Today, travellers from all over the world visit Rome to explore its 600km network of catacombs, spread out over five storeys underground near the Park of the Tombs of Via Latina. Dedicated to Christian saints, they are adorned with some of the earliest Christian artwork in the world, dating back to the 2nd Century, featuring paintings on the tunnel walls that depict ancient life. Sacred catacombs open to the public include the Catacombs of Priscilla (Via Salaria, 430), the Catacombs of St Callixtus (Via Appia Antica, 110-126) and the Catacombs of St Agnes (Via Nomentana, 349). The Vatican provides details on how to visit these and other holy burial sites. A few Jewish catacombs, including the catacombs on the Vigna Randanini and those in the Villa Torlonia, are also open to the public -- though some by appointment.

 

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A glimpse of teenage life in ancient Rome - Ray Laurence

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-glimpse-of-teenage-life-in-ancient-rome-ray-laurence

 

Welcome to the world of Lucius Popidius Secundus, a 17-year old living in Rome in 73 AD. His life is a typical one of arranged marriages, coming-of-age festivals, and communal baths. Take a look at this exquisitely detailed lesson on life of a typical Roman teenager two thousand years ago.

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-glimpse-of-teenage-life-in-ancient-rome-ray-laurence

Welcome to the world of Lucius Popidius Secundus, a 17-year old living in Rome in 73 AD. His life is a typical one of arranged marriages, coming-of-age festivals, and communal baths. Take a look at this exquisitely detailed lesson on life of a typical Roman teenager two thousand years ago.

Lesson by Ray Laurence, animation by Cognitive Media.


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Marshall Shogun Dore's curator insight, May 5, 2013 9:11 AM

A light-hearted but informative video of a day in the life of a teenage Roman boy. Gives an interesting insight into the differences and similarities of ancient society to modern day life.

Amanda Chadwick's curator insight, August 20, 2014 10:15 PM

teenage life in ancient rome

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Discover Ancient Rome in Google Earth

"See Rome as it looked in 320 AD and fly down to see famous buildings and monuments in 3D. Select the 'Ancient Rome 3D' layer under Gallery in Google Earth."


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Giuseppe Corsaro's curator insight, August 13, 2013 8:32 AM

Guardare l'antica Roma così come appariva nel 320 d.C. e volare giù per vedere edifici famosi in 3D. Seleziona 'Ancient Rome 3D'  nella Gallery di Google Earth.

Neville R Langit's curator insight, January 13, 2014 9:56 PM

got to love google earth

Keith Mielke's curator insight, January 17, 2014 4:10 PM

It's astounding how modern technology can really take us back to ancient times to see how others not only lived but prospered.

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Ancient Roman History Timeline

Ancient Roman History Timeline | 7th grade history Rome | Scoop.it
Provides a chronological history of Ancient Rome with extensive links to internet resources.

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, September 8, 2013 10:37 PM

The descriptions of what is accurate and what is false in the movie Gladiator is especially helpful.

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PBS - Roman City - David Macaulay

The glories of Ancient Rome are explored in ROMAN CITY, based on David Macaulay's acclaimed book. This animated and live-action video recounts life in Verbon...

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David Walp's curator insight, April 4, 2013 8:06 PM

Roman City - based on David Macaulay's book

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Apps in Education: Immersive History Experience on the iPad with Lesson Ideas

Apps in Education: Immersive History Experience on the iPad with Lesson Ideas | 7th grade history Rome | Scoop.it

"Virtual History Roma presents a fantastic voyage to Ancient Rome, the capital of the largest empire in the ancient world, which has been reconstructed in virtual form and which you can explore in a “full-immersion” panoramic experience. This app allows you to fully appreciate the building construction, scale and atmosphere that was Ancient Rome. At the higher end of the app market at $10.99 AU it is a bit expensive but it certain has the capacity to entice students into the ancient world."


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Restoration starts at crumbling ancient city of Pompeii

Restoration starts at crumbling ancient city of Pompeii | 7th grade history Rome | Scoop.it
ROME -- Conservation work at the crumbling ancient Roman city of Pompeii began Wednesday, a day after police announced a corruption probe into previous restoration work at the site.

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David Connolly's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:14 AM

Corruption and conservation...  a heady mix!

Evie Masterton's curator insight, August 20, 2013 9:23 PM
hey liv nice scoop!
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Ides of March - The Assassination of Julius Caesar by Walks of Italy

Travel back in time in the footsteps of Julius Caesar on his final day, the Ides of March, March 15th 44 BC. You'll takewalkswith Jason Spiehler, co-founder of Walks of Italy and ancient Rome historian. We hope you enjoy this mini documentary that tells one of the most important stories of the western world!


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Robert T. Preston's curator insight, May 22, 2013 6:29 PM

No trip to Europe would be complete without a visit to Rome, Italy.  Greater still, is a walk in the old section, buried for years beneath tidal mud, and rescued by archeologists.  Here, supposedly, is where Caesar is buried.  Here, is where Rome began.

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Ancient Links: Plumbing and Toilets in Ancient Rome

Ancient Links: Plumbing and Toilets in Ancient Rome | 7th grade history Rome | Scoop.it

Ancient Living - plumbing in ancient Rome


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Gabriel Rodriguez's curator insight, March 7, 2014 11:17 PM

it's interesting to think that in ancient times only the rich could have access to toilets. 

Chase Lee's curator insight, March 8, 2014 2:41 AM

Good for them. If that is what they were used for, then good for them. I am a fan of plumbing. When i look at it that's not really what i see. it looks more artistic than practical.

Patrick Kwong's curator insight, March 9, 2014 4:59 AM

The plumbing system in Rome is an extraordinary feature among the many architecture such as aqueducts and roads. The Romans had a “perfected” version of the ancient pipeline, as public toilets and private homes were connected to a main drainage system, which is comparable to our extremely vast pipeline throughout America. It’s impressive that these Romans were so ahead of their time, but unfortunate that only the higher class could be allowed to live …more hygienically, as the poor  would use urine to launder clothes.