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32 Characteristics Of High-Performing Classrooms

32 Characteristics Of High-Performing Classrooms | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Ness Crouch, Les Howard, Kathy Adams
Debbie Goodis's insight:

Can these posters be purchased and printed?

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Dr. Gordon Dahlby's curator insight, August 1, 2013 2:28 PM
I enjoyed Beth Dichter's insight:

Additional categories include:

* Curriculum Mapping

* Lesson Planning

* Learner Choice

* Student Support

* Classroom Management

Each category has four tips. Four tips (each from a different category) are below. To see the full infographic click  through to the post.

* Technology is a means, not an end

* Bloom’s Taxonomy (or related learning taxonomies) is/are used to move students from basic to complex thinking daily

* Rigor is omnipresent, from bell ringers and quizzes to accountable talk and assessments

* There are exemplar models immediately accessible to students of all important work and activities

Kimberly House's curator insight, August 11, 2013 8:13 AM

Some good reminders in here.

Dafina Westbrooks's curator insight, August 12, 2013 10:04 AM

More like this please!

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Rescooped by Debbie Goodis from The 21st Century
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Apple Launches Apps for Teachers Category

Apple Launches Apps for Teachers Category | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it
In recognition of the widespread use of iPad sin schools and general education, Apple recently released a new Apps for Teachers category in the App Store.…

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, October 16, 2013 9:19 PM

Apples is moving forward with the iPad teacher resources.

Rachael Jones's curator insight, October 17, 2013 9:36 PM

Thank you Apple!

Selin Gelinci's curator insight, October 31, 2013 8:54 AM

This resource gave me quick insight on the app's that i could download for the future on the ipads. It was beneficial to me because as technology is very popular in regards to education in the 21st century, it is useful to have read this website and explore further into things that were launched by Apple in order to help teachers with their teaching with the use of ipads. 

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10 Good Search Engines for Teachers and Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Good Search Engines for Teachers and Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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M Dolores Solé Gómez's curator insight, October 15, 2013 4:43 PM

Good to know! I knew 2 from 10. I will explore the others.

Rescooped by Debbie Goodis from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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How the Common Core State Standards Will Transform English Language Arts Instruction

How the Common Core State Standards Will Transform English Language Arts Instruction | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it

By Tim Shanahan

With the Common Core State Standards, instruction in English language arts will dramatically change. Unlike prior state standards, these new standards place a greater emphasis on reading challenging texts.


Via Mel Riddile
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Common Core standards add writing to the equation

Common Core standards add writing to the equation | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it
One of the big ideas behind the Common Core is to break down barriers between subjects, encouraging math students to write about problems rather than merely turn in a row of numbers.

Via Mel Riddile
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hedgeshandy's comment, October 17, 2013 6:27 AM
Its striking<br>
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3 Lessons Kentucky Can Teach the Rest of the U.S. About the Common Core

3 Lessons Kentucky Can Teach the Rest of the U.S. About the Common Core | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it

Kentucky’s experience over the past three school years suggests it will be

a slow and potentially frustrating road ahead for the other states that are using the Common Core.Test scores are still dismal, and state officials have expressed concern that the pace of improvement is not fast enough.Districts have also seen varying success in changing how teachers teach, something that was supposed to change under the new standards.
Via Mel Riddile
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One of the most important reading and writing skills: Showing Evidence

One of the most important reading and writing skills: Showing Evidence | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it
Common Core skill: Showing evidence from the text to support your answer

Via Mel Riddile
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Jessica Zepeda's curator insight, October 15, 2013 8:05 PM

A lot of time when i'm writing I find myself trying to make a point but not giving evidence to support my theory. 

Katie Halberg's curator insight, October 15, 2013 11:14 PM

I really enjoyed reading this, It states how with a little hard work and using are minds we can answer easy questions like "how did reading that book make you feel" the answer to that questions is not inside that book, you have to read the book to use your own feelings and thoughts to answer the question. it always shows how times have changed and auto books help the few people who wont really open a book to read it or may not know how to read very well but still want to know more about whats inside the book.

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, October 17, 2013 12:33 PM

One of the most important reading and writing skills students should practice is showing evidence from the text to support their answers. However, many of my students struggle with this. In the past, our students have been programmed to fill in a bubble answer on a standardized test that shows the evidence rather than try to find it themselves.

Show your students how to give evidence by demonstrating it (see visual aid, above).
My example question is from Divergent by Veronica Roth. It asks: “How does Beatrice’s mother feel about her? Give evidence from chapter one to support your answer.”

In the past, students may have just given me short answers like, "She cares about her daughter." By asking for evidence, students can't just give their opinion. We know their opinion is based on something, so they have to be further prompted to tell us what they based it on. Therefore, the student's answer should include not only their opinion, but one or two examples from the text that show this. Their answers should be paraphrased, but they still need to include the page number. 
This question-strategy helps those struggling readers find the right answers, as well. If a student wrote, "She's mean," he/she would have to back it up with an example from the chapter that shows Beatrice's mother is mean. When he/she can't find an example, he/she will have to re-think his/her original opinion. 
For students who are really struggling, I may prompt them orally with questions like, "Look at the non-verbal clues: what is Beatrice's mom doing to Beatrice in the first scene of the book? What does her mood seem to be? How do you know she feels this way? When a mother acts this way toward a child, what does it indicate about how she feels toward the child?" 


There are always a handful of students who complain that they can't find the answers in the book. If you have these same complainers, these are your students who are not reading the book. Because even students who have severe learning disabilities can answer the questions when they read it (or listen to the text).

So here's what I say to the complainers: "You aren't going to find a single sentence that gives you the answer to the question. And the answer isn't merely your opinion, either. The answer comes from that feeling you get about the character, or the theme, or whatever it is you're looking for. It's based on what you've inferred and gathered from descriptions and dialogue that can only come from reading it. Simply put, there is no short cut. The text must be read to answer the questions."

[Insert student groans.] After they channel their inner first-grader and throw another "I don't want to read" fit, they usually buck up and start reading.

Note: I do not mind allowing students to listen to audio of the text, especially if they follow along with their books. If this is the only way to get those reluctant readers to read, I say go for it. Today's teens are not like us. They learn much differently; we need to access and use every resource, device, and strategy to help them read on their own.

If you need handouts for instituting the Common Core standards into your curriculum, I have you covered! Check out all these great resources, ready to use with ANY text (fiction or non-fiction):
CCSS Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 6,7,8
CCSS Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 9-10 (Also covers grades 6-8)
CCSS Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 11-12 (Also covers grades 6-10)

For non-fiction text and historical documents:
CCSS History & Social Studies Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 6-12

For non-fiction and scientific texts:
CCSS Science & Technical Subjects Reading Graphic Organizers, Grades 6-12
FREE: CCSS Science & Technical Subjects Reading Graphic Organizers for RST.1, Grades 6-12

Rescooped by Debbie Goodis from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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From Now On, No One On Facebook Can Hide From You (Unless They Block You)

From Now On, No One On Facebook Can Hide From You (Unless They Block You) | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it
Mwah ha ha. People can't hide from you on Facebook any more (unless they block you).

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 11, 2013 6:41 AM

 

Make sure your privacy settings are on lock-down. The best way to test that they are is to use Facebook’s “View As” feature to see what a stranger can see when they look at your profile.


Rescooped by Debbie Goodis from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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The Complete Visual Guide To Technology For Children [Infographic]

The Complete Visual Guide To Technology For Children [Infographic] | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it
This handy visual guide explores technology use by young children. How much and what do they use, and is it appropriate?

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 12, 2013 9:59 AM

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching?tag=Infographic

 

Paul's curator insight, October 13, 2013 9:16 AM

Great infographic - we always me to consider the human element when we integrate technology into the classroom.

AnnC's curator insight, October 13, 2013 7:37 PM

Lots of great information addressing access to and use of technology by children!

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Common Core standards put focus back on critical thinking

Common Core standards put focus back on critical thinking | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it

In Julie Shankle’s English class at North High in Torrance, the Macbeth unit is no longer just the study of a 17th century play about a man who commits murder in a bid to become king and maintain power. Now, her 12th-grade lesson has an added element: Students must mine data to produce an essay based on the prompt, “Is killing ever justified?” This means making a compelling case and citing credible sources — perhaps a news article on euthanasia, or a TED Talks video of a professor expounding on the death penalty.


Via Mel Riddile
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32 Characteristics Of High-Performing Classrooms

32 Characteristics Of High-Performing Classrooms | 7th Grade ELA | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Ness Crouch, Les Howard, Kathy Adams
Debbie Goodis's insight:

Can these posters be purchased and printed?

more...
Dr. Gordon Dahlby's curator insight, August 1, 2013 2:28 PM
I enjoyed Beth Dichter's insight:

Additional categories include:

* Curriculum Mapping

* Lesson Planning

* Learner Choice

* Student Support

* Classroom Management

Each category has four tips. Four tips (each from a different category) are below. To see the full infographic click  through to the post.

* Technology is a means, not an end

* Bloom’s Taxonomy (or related learning taxonomies) is/are used to move students from basic to complex thinking daily

* Rigor is omnipresent, from bell ringers and quizzes to accountable talk and assessments

* There are exemplar models immediately accessible to students of all important work and activities

Kimberly House's curator insight, August 11, 2013 8:13 AM

Some good reminders in here.

Dafina Westbrooks's curator insight, August 12, 2013 10:04 AM

More like this please!