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Citi: Learn Everyday

Learning & Performance Guru Charles Jennings offers practical advice about how we can build continuous learning, via Experience, Exposure and Educatio
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This video for Citi by Charles Jennings shows how 70:20:10 (badged for Citi as 3E - Experience, Exposure and Education) can be used as a way to embrace complexity and respond to an environment of increased speed and rate of change. It explains the process clearly and simply. I also like the way it emphasises the value of networks (connections and relationships) as tools for sensemaking, sharing, solving and creating together. 

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70-20-10: Origin, Research, Purpose

70-20-10: Origin, Research, Purpose | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
Where It All Began

The 70-20-10 model has been part of the corporate learning and development lexicon for decades. Some people find implementing 70-20-10 brings transformational change to their corporate learning cultures. Others are not quite sure what to make of it or how to leverage the model. A last group discounts it claiming 70-20-10 has no research to back it up and that it provides little value because the numbers are not accurate.

Recently I had a conversation with Bob Eichinger, one of the original thought leaders who created the 70-20-10 model, about its origin, research, and purpose. I found what Bob said to be so compelling that I asked him to write it up. Bob agreed. Here is what he shared:

To Whom It Apparently Concerns,

Yes Virginia, there is research behind 70-20-10!

I am Robert W. Eichinger, PhD. I’m one of the creators, along with the research staff of the Center for Creative Leadership, of the 70-20-10 meme [the dictionary defines a meme as an “idea, behavior, or style that spreads from person to person”]. Note: see The Leadership Machine, Michael M. Lombardo and Robert W. Eichinger, Lominger International, Inc., Third Edition 2007, Chapter 21, Assignmentology: The Art of Assignment Management, pages 314-361.

At the time in the late 1980s, Michael Lombardo and I were teaching a course at the Center called Tools for Developing Effective Executives. The course was basically a summary of the findings of The Lessons of Experience study done over a 13-year period at the Center and published in 1988. My job was to convert the study’s findings into practical practices. Mike represented the CCL research staff and I was a practitioner at PepsiCo, and then at Pillsbury.

We were working on a section of the course on planning for the development of future leaders. One of the study’s objectives was to find out where today’s leaders learned the skills and competencies they were good at when they got into leadership positions.

The study interviewed 191 currently successful executives from multiple organizations. As part of an extensive interview protocol, researchers asked these executives about where they thought they learned things from that led to their success – The Lessons of Success. The interviewers collected 616 key learning events which the research staff coded into 16 categories.

The 16 categories were too complex to use in the course so we in turn re-coded the 16 categories into five to make them easier to communicate.

The five categories were learning from challenging assignments, other people, coursework, adverse situations and personal experiences (outside work). Since we were teaching a course about how to develop effective executives, we could not use the adverse situations (can’t plan for or arrange them for people) and personal experiences outside of work (again, can’t plan for them). Those two categories made up 25% of the original 16 categories. That left us with 75% of the Lessons of Success for the other three categories.

So the final easy-to-communicate meme was: 70% Learning from Challenging Assignments; 20% Learning from Others; and 10% Learning from Coursework. And thus we created the 70-20-10 meme widely quoted still today.

The basic findings of the Lessons of Success study have been duplicated at least nine times that I know of. These include samples in China, India and Singapore and for female leaders, since the original samples of executives in the early 80s were mostly male. The findings are all roughly in line with 70-20-10. They are 70-22-8, 56-38-6 (women), 48-47-5 (middle level), 73-16-11 (global sample), 60-33-7, 69-27-4 (India), 65-33-2 (Singapore) and 68-25-7 (China). A number of companies including 3M have also replicated the study and found roughly the same results.

So some have said that 70-20-10 doesn’t come from any research. It does. Some have said the 70-20-10 is just common sense. It is now. Experience has always been the best teacher. Still is.

I might add that there is a lot of variance between organizations and levels and types of people. These studies were mostly about how to develop people for senior leadership positions in large global companies. The meme for other levels of leadership and different kinds of companies might be different. There might also be other memes for different functional areas.

Sincerely,
Bob

From My Perspective

From my perspective, Bob and Mike’s genius was to take the 16 sources of learning present in the 616 key learning events, as recounted by the participants in the Lessons of Success study, drop out the 25% of learning that comes from hardship and beyond work, and turn the remainder into a meme of three sources of learning now known around the world as 70-20-10. As a meme or reference model, it both validates the importance of Formal Courses – the “10” as well as opening up the opportunity of intentionally activating Learning from Challenging Assignments – the “70” and Learning from Others – the “20.”

Implications

1. Bob and Mike’s 70-20-10 meme made visible that learning takes place both in formal settings (the 10) as well as in experience (the 70) and through relationships (the 20). As a model, its value is not in trying to determine with precision the exact numbers to the left or right of a decimal point, but instead to use it to open our eyes to learning that is happening all the time on-the-job, but is largely invisible.

2. When 70-20 learning becomes visible and intentional, the implication is that Learning & Development has the opportunity to harness its potential. The challenge is how can L&D activate and support informal and social learning in an intentional, high impact way that builds a vibrant learning culture? And this learning culture leads to higher performance as employees embrace continuous development on the job. The 70-20 learning of today’s workforce is largely self-directed. Just look at the web searches you have done in the last week. The opportunity for L&D is to add value by making available the resources, people, expertise and digital tools to support and accelerate the 70-20 learning that happens every day and everywhere.

3. It turns out that there is now significant research that supports the reality and value of learning beyond the formal “10.” For example, David Kolb in his Second Edition of Experiential Learning cites nearly 4,000 bibliographic research and application references. The question is how can L&D best take advantage of the great research that has already been done and put it into practice? How can today’s L&D groups be effective at delivering formal learning with support so that it is well applied on the job? What approaches can we take to enable self-directed 70-20 learning that improves capabilities and performance throughout an organization?

This is a very exciting time in our industry and we’re delighted to be part of the conversation and the exploration of new strategies to drive competitive advantage and improved performance through 70-20 learning.
Andrew Gerkens's insight:

Bob Eichinger speaks about the original work that led to the 70:20:10 meme. I love how matter of factly he responds to questions people raise around the lack of research etc. 

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70+20+10=100: The Evidence Behind the Numbers

Laura Overton presented these slides at a workshop facilitated by the Corporate Learning Consortium on 21 April 2016. Towards Maturity have been able to explor…
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A fantastic slideshare capturing evidence from practical application of 70:20:10 within organisations and busting some of the myths around the framework

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Level Unlocked - 70:20:10 Forum congratulates its first Certified Practitioner

Level Unlocked -  70:20:10 Forum congratulates its first Certified Practitioner | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
70:20:10 Forum congratulates Sharon English from the Victorian Building Authority, Australia, as the first practitioner to complete 70:20:10 Practitioner Certification. She shares her experience of the program here.
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Some really interesting insights from Sharon English about how she has implemented 70:20:10 and used 70:20:10 certification as a scaffold to support her to work out loud and achieve her workplace objectives

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Citi: Experience Exposure Education: Citi’s Approach to Connected Learning

We learn every day. If we take every opportunity to learn and develop ourselves, we improve not just our own performance, but that of our team and Citi as a ...
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Citibank video explaining their approach to 70:20:10 using the 3E.


I like the video, but I've found myself consciously talking less about learning (and learners) and more about working. Learning often sounds like something extra and something the L&D function is pushing. We need to make the hard connections and link more clearly to performance and the workplace.


I was imagining how this (type of) video would come across if the term learning was not mentioned at all and instead, was replaced with statements like:

'How do we help you perform and develop?'

'How do we support you to get better at what you do every day?'

'How do we enable you to solve problems and respond to challenges you face in your role?'

'How do we build and share knowledge at the speed of business?'

'How do we empower people to perform and develop and respond to the increasing impact of change and complexity?'


It is only a slightly different pitch, but for me, it reinforces the idea that learning is working and not something separate or 'nice' - it also speaks to the needs of the individual worker and more directly to performance outcomes and impact.

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The origins of 70:20:10

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People are often seeking the source of the 70:20:10 'numbers', so this blog and link to CCL references is perfect.


The most important part of the post for me are the last few sentences:


70:20:10 -if nothing else- reminds us of the holistic way we learn and helps us (re)focus on the different elements of the package, as the sole focus for too long had been on courses. Just that is a tremendeous way forward. Don't make more of 70:20:10 than it is though. (Hint: it is not a law or a general recipe.) Think about balance rather than proportions.

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6 Steps to Creating Learning Ecosystems (and Why You Should Bother)

6 Steps to Creating Learning Ecosystems (and Why You Should Bother) | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
Here’s a quick recap for those just tuning in...70:20:10 has shone a spotlight on the limits of formal learning. In contrast, social and experiential learning continue to be veritable goldmines of productivity, placing learners at the centre of their story and demanding a major shift from Learning & Development professionals.Skip ahead and we find ourselves faced with an amazing opportunity. We can shed our obsession with isolated formal learning and embrace the real question: how can we best support organisations and individuals to develop a culture of
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The learning (or perhaps more appropriately, performance) ecosystem - what are all the things that help you do your job, support you to solve problems and challenge you to get better at what you do every single day? Is your ecosystem left to chance or by design?

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Charles Jennings: "70:20:10 is a framework for change"

Charles Jennings: "70:20:10 is a framework for change" | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
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A nice overview of 70:20:10 by Charles Jennings, reinforces the simple and genuine ways people develop and improve and the fact that 70:20:10 is really a mindset, rather than a formula. If you're focusing on the numbers, you don't understand the framework. Charles links 70:20:10 to how professionals achieve and sustain mastery.

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702010 Forum Value Creation Story

702010 Forum Value Creation Story | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
I came across the idea of using value creation stories to assess the value of online interactions in an article by Jane Bozarth.  She used a conceptual framework from Etienne Wenger, Beverly Trayno...
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Wow - this is an amazing reflection on the value of engagement in an online community (in this case the 70:20:10 Forum) and how it has supported value creation (in this case the implementation of 70:20:10).

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Performance and Development through a 70:20:10 lens

Performance and Development through a 70:20:10 lens | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
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70:20:10 is simply a mindset. When people understand how they can really develop and improve performance, they can take ownership of the process.


70:20:10 makes it easy for people to understand the path to high performance/mastery. It also helps L&D recognise their role in supporting and enabling workplace learning.


#my702010

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Seeking Answers on the Lackluster State of Leadership - ATD

Seeking Answers on the Lackluster State of Leadership - ATD | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
The Global Leadership Forecast 2014/2015 indicates that leaders aren’t ready for the challenges before them. But it also shows how organizations can close the gap.
Andrew Gerkens's insight:

A great article with some fantastic insights.


They do however, argue against 70:20:10 for a ratio of 52:26:21... Learning is contextual, so there is no 'perfect' ratio or set of numbers. Every situation/context will be different. For this reason, I would caution anyone against thinking that 52:27:21, 70:20:10 or any other ratio is 'the' answer.


70:20:10 (as a framework) is simply a holistic approach that recognises the right balance of experiential, social and structured learning is required for each situation. The numbers only serve to reinforce where most of the performance improvement will occur - in the workplace, through experience and others, and where the learning function should focus the bulk of its effort.


The many people implementing 70:20:10 that I speak to do not seek to validate the ratios, or to create a ratio based solution. They instead use 70:20:10 as a guide for creating holistic solutions that respond to business needs and genuinely improve performance and effectiveness. They are also using 70:20:10 as a change agent - helping HR and L&D to become a more strategic and agile function. 70:20:10 helps practitioners to begin to explore their role in enabling, guiding and supporting workplace learning. This requires new capabilities, mindsets and operating models.


70:20:10 has evolved since the original work done by CCL. It no longer represents a basic insight into manager effectiveness, but now acts as a strategic framework and change agent.

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Workplace learning that works

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Many organisations struggle to understand how to create, implement and measure the impact of targeted experiential and social learning solutions. I took some work on Adding and Extracting done by the Corporate Executive Board and further explored by Charles Jennings, and turned it into the Adding, Embedding, Extracting Model - a more holistic view of workplace learning.

The project improved my understanding of experiential and social learning. It also allowed me to build a body of work around the model, including a range of solution design tools and guidance, which have been made available to 70:20:10 Forum members to assist them in applying the model to practice.

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Can Leadership Be Taught?

Can Leadership Be Taught? | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it

This is an old question, even a hackneyed one. Many might say that research and experience over the past decade or two demonstrate that leadership is far better learned than taught. On-the-job – and its first cousins action, experiential, and community learning – are held in the highest regard. The [...]

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The sum is greater than the parts...

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Experience Driven Development

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Cindy McCauley of CCL shares some of the data that sits behind the 70:20:10 and the research done by CCL and the key questions that drove the results: 

When you think about your career as a manager, certain events or episodes probably stand out in your mind—things that led to a lasting change in you as a manager. Identify at least three “key events” in your career: things that made a difference in the way you manage now. What happened? What did you learn from it (for better or worse)?

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70:20:10 implementation the DNV GL way

70:20:10 implementation the DNV GL way | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
A look at the critical role of the line manager as competence manager and how to ensure management buy-in for successful implementation
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Glenn Ruud explains DNV GL's approach to implementing 70:20:10, including alignment with business strategy and engagement of line leaders

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The 70:20:10 lens

The 70:20:10 lens | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
In 70:20:10 for trainers I advocated the use of the 70:20:10 model by L&D professionals as a lens through which to view their instructional design. The excellent comments on my post, and insightful blog posts by others – notably Mark Britz, Clark Quinn and Arun Pradhan – have prompted me to think deeper about my…
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What’s the Problem with 70:20:10?

What’s the Problem with 70:20:10? | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
Andrew Gerkens's insight:

Fantastic article by Mark Britz exploring some of the considerations/challenges/opportunities for 70:20:10. Make sure you read the comments. I particularly like this comment by Clark Quinn, 'The point is not to build the 70:20:10 brand, but instead to get folks to think outside the ‘courses’ model. 70:20:10 has proven to be useful for that purpose. If you have other ways, fine, but we need *something*'. 


I agree that 70:20:10 needs to be owned by the organisation, rather than be seen as an L&D initiative. I also believe strongly that 70:20:10 needs to be discussed using the stakeholder's language of work and working and not learners and learning. 70:20:10 is about how we build capability, how we build and share knowledge and how we support people to develop and perform. If we focus on capability and performance as outcomes and position 70:20:10 as a holistic means for getting there, we're in a much better position to get people on board and work together to bring the framework to life. 


With this in mind, maybe a simple exercise is to ask your executives to describe how we build and sustain capability, how we build and share knowledge, how we develop and engage talent…..


Maybe then the simplicity of 70:20:10 and its ability to connect a range of strategic challenges will become not only clear, but a burning organisational platform.


Follow up post from Mark:

http://markbritz.com/702010s-identity-crisis/#comment-165

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Charles Jennings: Exploiting learning in the workplace

Charles Jennings: Exploiting learning in the workplace - DeakinPrime helps change the world of a person, an organisation and its customers by delivering not just a service, but a culture of learning that encourages people to develop and improve
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Charles Jennings discusses how 70:20:10 and a focus on workplace learning can best support people to perform and develop in times of increasing change and complexity.


The piece on leadership development (min 48.13) is interesting as is the section on Adding Learning to Work, Embedding Learning within Workflows and Extracting Learning from Work (min 50.30) - Adding, Embedding, Extracting & Sharing provide great insights into what 70:20 solutions look like and the scope of the opportunity to make workplace learning intentional. 


The section on Embedding is especially interesting, as it focuses on the role of Performance Support - solutions that help workers to learn in the moment of apply (i.e. access just-in-time HELP when performing a task or responding to a challenge). Performance Support solutions include checklists, aide memoirs, help guides, help desks, online help, Yammer, SMEs, amongst many, many others and have huge potential to impact performance. 


This article has more information on the power of performance support tools and resources and some fantastic examples. It is a long read, but well and truly worth it. It talks a lot about how checklists/aide memoirs support people to work through complexity:

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2007/12/10/the-checklist

This article includes research demonstrating that a focus on performance support can reduce formal training time by up to 50%, whilst increasing speed to competence and quality outcomes (see the second link). The message is simple. We don't have to try and give people all the answers they need a solid foundation and to know where to go to find help and explore further (i.e. find the answers if/when they need it):

http://www.learningsolutionsmag.com/articles/1141/show-me-the-roi

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How a new learning mindset is transforming today's workplace

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This white paper explores the idea of learning ecosystems and references the work of the 70:20:10 Forum, Charles Jennings and Jane Hart, amongst others. You can explore the background and register for the white paper here
https://get.pluralsight.com/new-learning-mindset.html?utm_source=linkedin&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=learning-mindset-wp&as_clid=b4a2df21-65ce-42a4-c642-1e1b896932f6

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A Path to Performance Management Reform

A Path to Performance Management Reform | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
In the previous blog, “Same Ingredients, Different Recipe: Innovating on Performance Goals, Feedback, and Ratings,” we discussed practical ways to evolve goal setting, feedback, and performance ratings for the new work environment. Now, let’s break down the critical factors needed to drive real and lasting behavior change in the organization.
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70% of what employees learn comes from experience, yet 73% of the L&D investment is targeted at formal training.


Explores experiential approaches and the role of line leaders and the broader network/PLN. It also discusses the importance of reflection and feedback. 


A link to the previous blog, exploring performance goals, feedback and ratings:

https://www.td.org/Publications/Blogs/Human-Capital-Blog/2015/06/Same-Ingredients-Different-Recipe?mktcops=c.human-capital&mktcois=c.integrated-talent-management~c.perf-improvement

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The 70:20:10 model: the good, the bad and the misunderstandings

The 70:20:10 model: the good, the bad and the misunderstandings | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
Andrew Gerkens's insight:

This is a really useful summary with some important observations. I'd prefer it if the post focused on performance, rather than learning.


The 'bad' points John refers to are not so much about failings with the framework, but how we socialise/communicate, how we support workplace learning, and the mindset and capability shift required of L&D to support workplace learning/70:20:10.


Even the point about certificates can easily be mitigated. Instead of doing a course and getting a certificate - L&D can create/support guided workplace learning experiences (experiential, social and structured) that award a certificate for what they have seen, done and achieved - much more powerful and outcomes focused!

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Putting 70:20:10 to work - YouTube

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Charles Jennings and Nigel Paine discuss 70:20:10 at Learning Technologies 2015 UK.


Debunks a few of the common myths regarding the framework

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How The 70:20:10 Model Can Takeoff - eLearning Industry

How The 70:20:10 Model Can Takeoff - eLearning Industry | 70:20:10 | Scoop.it
The 70:20:10 model for workplace has garnered a lot of popularity in recent years as the ‘next big thing’ in Learning and Development. The 70:20:10 Model.
Andrew Gerkens's insight:

This is a disappointing post as the author's fundamental concern with 70:20:10 is 'empirical evidence'. Questions about empirical evidence always centre around validating the 70:20:10 numbers.


KEY POINT - People implementing 70:20:10 do not seek to validate the numbers, but instead seek to create holistic solutions that respond to business needs and genuinely improve performance and effectiveness. They are using the framework to build a more strategic and agile learning function.


Learning is contextual, so every situation will be different – there is no ‘correct’ set of numbers. What is agreed, and there is much research backing it up, is that most of the skills workers need to be effective in their roles are developed in the workplace.  There is also much evidence that traditional L&D solutions and are largely ineffective – they are too slow, too costly, too inflexible and lack impact.


Are perople implementing 70:20:10 building evidence - ABSOLUTELY - but not on the 70:20:10 numbers. Their evidence is impact on individual, team and organisational performance as measured by their stakeholders.

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