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Stand Watie - Cherokee

Stand Watie - Cherokee | 500 Nations | Scoop.it
Google's approach to email
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4 Ways to Honor Native Americans Without Appropriating Our Culture

4 Ways to Honor Native Americans Without Appropriating Our Culture | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

Taté Walker asks people and institutions to stop profiting from stereotypes proven to harm and dehumanize Native people.


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‘Who Speaks Wukchumni?’

‘Who Speaks Wukchumni?’ | 500 Nations | Scoop.it
This short documentary profiles the last fluent speaker of Wukchumni, a Native American language, and her creation of a comprehensive dictionary.
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Alaska becomes the second state to officially recognize indigenous languages

Alaska becomes the second state to officially recognize indigenous languages | 500 Nations | Scoop.it
Dedicated supporters staged a 15 hour sit-in until the early this morning, when the Alaska Senate passed the measure on an 18-2 vote.

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Changing the Way We See Native Americans

 

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. In 2013 Matika Wilbur took on a project of massive scope: to photograph members of each Federally recognized tribe in the United States. "My dream," Wilbur says, "is that our children are given images that are more useful, truthful, and beautiful." 


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Finally a Music Festival Bans Native American Headdresses

Finally a Music Festival Bans Native American Headdresses | 500 Nations | Scoop.it
A line has been drawn in the sand over Native American cultural appropriation in the music industry.
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Black American Indians seek to honor their mixed ancestry

Black American Indians seek to honor their mixed ancestry | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

 

At the first gathering of the newly created National Congress of Black American Indians, organizers and attendees came to unite and celebrate individuals of both African and Native American ancestry — a subject often fraught with complicated questions of race, identity and citizenship.


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Freedom Babies

Freedom Babies | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

 

This documentary follows Kanahus over the course of a year as she raises her babies decolonized and free from the restrictions of the Canadian government. Kanahus and her father, Arthur Manuel, reminisce about the plight they have faced against the Canadian government in their effort to fight against colonization by encouraging Indigenous people to live free. 


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The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never ...

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never ... | 500 Nations | Scoop.it
Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans. As a teenager, Carapella says he could never get his hands on a continental U.S. map like this, depicting mor...
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In Landmark Decision, U.S. Patent Office Cancels Trademark For Redskins Football Team

In Landmark Decision, U.S. Patent Office Cancels Trademark For Redskins Football Team | 500 Nations | Scoop.it
The Board ruled that the name was "disparaging to Native Americans" and could not receive trademarks under federal law.
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Will the Buffalo continue its American legacy?

Will the Buffalo continue its American legacy? | 500 Nations | Scoop.it
Congress is said to be looking at a bill to make the North American Bison the official national mammal of the United States. Four members of the Senate have sponsored the advancement of the bill al...
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Smallpox 1775-1782

Smallpox 1775-1782 | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

 

Between 1775 and 1782 a smallpox epidemic swept through North America, shaping the course of the American Revolution and decimating native communities across the continent. A research and teaching tool, Pox Americana allows users to watch the epidemic unfold and read the accounts of those who witnessed (and survived) its devastating effects.


The seed data for Pox Americana was compiled by University of Colorado historian Elizabeth Fenn for her book, Pox Americana: The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82.

 


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Community Village Sites's curator insight, June 7, 1:57 AM


European (im)migrants knew that smallpox was killing Native Americans, and yet they continued to (im)migrate into Native American land. 


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Obama To Make First Visit To Native American Reservation As President

Obama To Make First Visit To Native American Reservation As President | 500 Nations | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama will pay his first visit as president to Indian Country when he travels to a Native American reservation in North Dakota next week.
In an opinion piece published Thursday by an online tribal newspaper, Obama announced that he and first lady Michelle Obama plan to visit Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in Cannon Ball. Obama said he wants to hear firsthand about the challenges Native Americans face and plans to announce new initiatives during the visit to grow Indian economies. "The history of the United States and tribal nations is filled with broken promises," Obama said. "But I believe that during my administration, we've turned a corner together."
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Native History: To Make Winter Survival Difficult, Army Slaughters 900 Horses

Native History: To Make Winter Survival Difficult, Army Slaughters 900 Horses | 500 Nations | Scoop.it
Approximately 900 horses belonging to tribes along what is now the Idaho/Washington border were needlessly slaughtered in 1858.
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Five-Year-Old Navajo Boy Denied Admission on First Day of School Because His Hair is Too Long

Five-Year-Old Navajo Boy Denied Admission on First Day of School Because His Hair is Too Long | 500 Nations | Scoop.it


Five-Year-Old Navajo Boy Denied Admission on First Day of School Because His Hair is Too Long

 

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SD Police Say Tazing 8-Year-Old Native Girl Was Justified, Family Sues

SD Police Say Tazing 8-Year-Old Native Girl Was Justified, Family Sues | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

 

The family of an 8-year-old Native American girl who was tazed by police in October is suing while the Pierre Police Department say it was justified.

 

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VIDEO - A THUNDER-BEING NATION - The Oglala Lakota of Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

 

The journey of the Oglala Lakota of Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, from their origins through to their contemporary life. The most comprehensive look at an Indian Reservation in a documentary made over 13 years by international award winning film-maker Steven Lewis Simpson director of Rez Bomb.


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How The Washington Football Team Creates A Hostile Environment For Native American Students

How The Washington Football Team Creates A Hostile Environment For Native American Students | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

 

WASHINGTON -- Much of the debate over whether to keep the Washington football team's name has centered around whether it's actually offensive to Native Americans. Owner Dan Snyder has searched high and low to find American Indians who aren't put off by the term "Redskins" as justification for keeping it.


But according to Erik Stegman, an author of a new report on Native mascots and team names, that discussion misses the point.


"This entire debate is being spun in the wrong direction, and it doesn't really matter whether or not one Native person you talk to supports or doesn't," Stegman said in an interview with The Huffington Post. "When you have kids in schools who are getting harassed, who are feeling a lack of self-worth because they themselves have become a mascot for someone else, I think that's really what the point is all about. We need to stop having this debate over which Native people are offended because it's a ridiculous debate."


Stegman is associate director of the Half in Ten Education Fund at the progressive Center for American Progress. Previously, he served as majority staff counsel for the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. He and Victoria Phillips, a professor at American University Washington College of Law, argue in a report published Tuesday that derogatory team names create an "unwelcome and hostile learning environment" for Native students that "directly results in lower self-esteem and mental health" for these adolescents and young adults.

 

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Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans

Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

 

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations.  (Above is a GIF of the map's time-lapse display; visit the map's page to play with its features.) 



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Prehistoric Skeleton Found In Mexico Sheds Light On First Americans

Prehistoric Skeleton Found In Mexico Sheds Light On First Americans | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

 

In this June 2013 photo provided by National Geographic, diver Susan Bird, working at the bottom of Hoyo Negro, a large dome-shaped underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, brushes a human skull found at the site while her team members take detailed photographs.

Thousands of years ago, a teenage girl fell into this deep hole and died. Now, her skeleton and her DNA are helping scientists study the origins of the first Americans.

An analysis of her remains was released Thursday, May 15, 2014 by the journal Science. Her DNA links her to an ancient land bridge connecting Asia and North America, and suggests she shares ancestors with the modern native peoples of the Americas.


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(AP Photo/National Geographic, Paul Nicklen)



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Community Village Sites's curator insight, July 10, 11:22 PM


So she's related to my wife, daughter and son. 


@getgln


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8 Big Lies History Books Tell About Natives

8 Big Lies History Books Tell About Natives | 500 Nations | Scoop.it
Do history books written by white folks tell the truth about Native Americans? We think not. Here are just some of the lies they tell.

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Indian Assimilation: The Mystery of the Tiny Handcuffs, Solved

Indian Assimilation: The Mystery of the Tiny Handcuffs, Solved | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

 

"the history of Indian boarding schools needs to be brought to the forefront of our collective consciousness in the United States"


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Community Village Sites's curator insight, June 26, 12:50 PM


The existence of these tiny hand cuffs is certainly horrific, but police STILL CONTINUE 'to 'handcuff' little kids.


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Native Hawaiian founds Hawaiian Boarding Company

Native Hawaiian founds Hawaiian Boarding Company | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

Native Hawaiian founds Hawaiian Boarding Company 

500Nations's insight:

"I heard the kahea kahiko, the old call, and I stopped denying my 
culture. I started wanting to rediscover the old ways." 

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Ely Samuel Parker, Seneca

Ely Samuel Parker, Seneca | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

 

Ely Samuel Parker (1828 – August 31, 1895), (born Hasanoanda, later known as Donehogawa) was a Seneca attorney, engineer, and tribal diplomat. He was commissioned a lieutenant colonel during the American Civil War, when he served as adjutant to General Ulysses S. Grant. He wrote the final draft of the Confederate surrender terms at Appomattox. Later in his career, Parker rose to the rank of Brevet Brigadier General, one of only two Native Americans to earn a general’s rank during the war.  President Grant appointed him as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the first Native American to hold that post.  He served as Chief of the six Iroquois Nations, consisting of the Tuscaroras, Cayugas, Senecas, Mohawks, Oneidas, and Onondagas.


Parker was born in 1828 as the sixth of seven children to William and Elizabeth Parker, of prominent Seneca families, at Indian Falls, New York (then part of the Tonawanda Reservation).  He was named Ha-sa-no-an-da and later baptized Ely Samuel Parker. His father was a miller and a Baptist minister.  Ely had a classical education at a missionary school, was fully bilingual, and went on to college.

 

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About IndianNation.com

About IndianNation.com | 500 Nations | Scoop.it

 

When Hernando de Soto carved his way through the Southeast in the 1540s, there were some eight million Native Americans living in North America. By 1900, the population had fallen by more than 95%.  For every twenty American Indians alive in 1500, there was only a single survivor four hundred years later.


In 1900, with the native population at its nadir, the United States was engaged in an ambitious effort to dissolve the remaining Indian tribes and incorporate their members into the general population.  Across the country, Indians were forced into boarding schools, where they were instructed to abandon their native cultures and languages and to learn a menial trade that they could practice off the reservation.


Reformers boasted of their accomplishments with photos showing the generational changes they imagined were occurring.

 

But the story is far more complicated than reformers let on.  Native peoples did not abandon their cultures and disappear into the general population. In communities large and small, Indians banded together to preserve their traditions and pass them on to future generations.


Today, more than three million Americans claim native ancestry.  The federal government recognizes the existence of 564 tribes, and many Indian cultures are flourishing.


IndianNation.org is dedicated to collecting and sharing the stories of the 237,000 Indians who appear in the 1900 census. By surviving, by maintaining their distinct identities in the face of concerted efforts to dissolve their culture, those Indians made the present possible.

 


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Community Village Sites's curator insight, June 7, 1:50 AM


The people in these old photos always look like they are being coerced.