Health on the Move > 2013
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Health on the Move > 2013
Health on the Move > 2013
On technology, tools and concepts related to health.
Curated by Thomas N. Burg
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Understanding the Factors That Influence the Adoption and Meaningful Use of Social Media by Physicians to Share Medical Information

Understanding the Factors That Influence the Adoption and Meaningful Use of Social Media by Physicians to Share Medical Information | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it

Perhaps, as physicians increasingly experiment with social media technologies, these tools may provide an efficient and effective means for staying abreast of the vast amount of medical knowledge required to deliver patient care. This might be transformative in medicine, as traditional lecture-based continuing medical education has been shown to be largely ineffective in changing physician behavior at the same time that medical knowledge is changing at the fastest pace in history [21-23]. Social media technologies could complement (or even replace) continuing medical education for physicians as either an informal or formal learning channel [24-26]. But for now, how social media channels are the vehicles through which physicians are exposed to emerging information that has the potential to inform or change practice remains an open question [27,28].

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Health-Care Apps That Doctors Use

Health-Care Apps That Doctors Use | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it

New health-care smartphone apps for doctors and patients help with everything from diagnostics and monitoring to revealing who isn't washing their hands.

 

Mobile apps for smartphones and tablets are changing the way doctors and patients approach health care. Many are designed for the doctors themselves, ranging from handy databases about drugs and diseases to sophisticated monitors that read a person's blood pressure, glucose levels or asthma symptoms. Others are for the patients—at their doctor's recommendation—to gather diagnostic data, for example, or simply to help coordinate care, giving patients an easy way to keep track of their conditions and treatments.

 

Doctors say many of the apps are useful time savers, and have the potential to make health care more efficient by speeding diagnosis, improving patient monitoring and reducing unnecessary visits to a physician or hospital. Still, the field has a way to go, doctors add, particularly when it comes to making good use of all the patient data being generated.

 

Here are some of the apps doctors are talking about most. Some are free; others cost several hundred dollars for a year's subscription. Those that combine an app and a wireless monitor cost from $80 to $200.

 

EPOCRATES One of the oldest and most established medical apps, Epocrates gives doctors basic information about drugs, the right dosing for adults and children, and warnings about harmful interactions. It has replaced many a copy of the Physician's Desk Reference.

 

 

UPTODATE This app provides reference material doctors can consult when making treatment decisions. David Bates, an internist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, says he has used it recently to look up treatment approaches for patients who have failed to respond to existing hypertension therapies, and for information on the drug combinations needed to treat a bacterial infection called H. pylori.

 

ISABEL Every doctor needs help reaching diagnoses. Here, doctors enter symptoms, and the app lists possible diagnoses as well as medications that could cause the symptoms.

 

ALIVECOR This portable heart monitor and app—one of the programs that opened Dr. Topol's eyes—runs on a patient's smartphone to produce electrocardiograms. Patients place their fingers over the monitor's sensors, which wirelessly communicate with the phone to produce the EKG.

 

 

RESOLUTIONMD Doctors can look at X-rays and other images on a smartphone or tablet when they use this app. Some doctors say the app is handy for viewing images as soon as they're available, no matter where the doctor happens to be.

 

ISCRUB This infection-control app collects and rapidly displays data on whether hospital staff are being scrupulous about washing their hands. Most hospitals have unofficial observers of whether doctors, nurses and other staff are following hand-hygiene guidelines. Many are not.

 

BREAST CANCER DIAGNOSIS GUIDE Using this app, breast-cancer patients enter and track details of their disease and treatment, from the size of the tumor to the presence or absence of estrogen receptors.

 

CLINICAM Increasingly, doctors are using their phones to take photos of a patient's condition—such as a rash or wound—and to upload the images to the patient's electronic medical record. One problem: That could violate health-care privacy laws if the doctor leaves the photo on his or her personal phone.

 

more at the original: http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303376904579137683810827104

     
Via nrip
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Online Medical Professionalism: Patient and Public Relationships:

"Because of the creation and use of information online and the widespread use of the Internet and Web 2.0 platforms, physicians and others are increasingly required to consider how best to protect patient interests and apply principles of professionalism to new setting"

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Tiny Injectable LEDs Manipulate the Brain With Light

Tiny Injectable LEDs Manipulate the Brain With Light | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it
Tiny, glowing probes packed with LEDs and sensors are scientists' newest tool for measuring and manipulating the brain and other living tissues.
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10 sensor innovations driving the digital health revolution

10 sensor innovations driving the digital health revolution | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it

This year IBM dedicated its Five in Five series (an annual list of five technologies that are likely to advance dramatically) solely to sensors.

 

Digital sensors of the touch, sight,hearing, taste and smell kind along with their potential are all profiled by IBM Sensor technology is going through a renaissance as companies develop smart and innovative new ways to track data using them.

 

Sensor innovation is in-part driving the Digital Health Revolution as digital health companies find ingenius ways to integrate them in to apps, devices and other peripherals. The smartphone will play an increasing important role in all of this as they go from having six built-in sensors currently to having sixteen in the next five years.

 

If these predictions are correct then the next five years will be half-a-decade of sensor proliferation meaning the Digital Health Ecosystem will grow exponentially. In the meantime though there are already a plethora of digital health sensors in use or in the pipeline that are helping people improve and, in some instances, save lives.


Via Andrew Spong, Thibaud Guymard
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Kristina Curtis's curator insight, April 18, 2013 1:34 PM

This will take the QS movement to another level...

Mitchell Planning's curator insight, June 28, 2013 5:21 PM

Peel and stick tatoo's taken to the next level.

David Vinson's curator insight, August 8, 2013 9:10 PM

You can't control it if you can't measure it!

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Bionic Eye Implant Approved for U.S. Patients

Bionic Eye Implant Approved for U.S. Patients | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it
A prosthetic device that can restore some sight to the blind has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The company that makes the device, Second Sight, based i...
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Docs avoid drug errors with mobile apps | Healthcare IT News

Docs avoid drug errors with mobile apps | Healthcare IT News | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it

physicians, apps

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A personalized food allergen testing platform on a cellphone - Lab on a Chip (RSC Publishing)

We demonstrate a personalized food allergen testing platform, termed iTube, running on a cellphone that images and automatically analyses colorimetric assays performed in test tubes toward sensitive and specific detection of allergens in food...
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Exciting

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MappyHealth - Winner of the ASPR/HHS Now Trending Challenge - Following disease trends, 140 characters at a time

Mappy Health is tracking disease trends and terms on twitter 140 characters at a time. The Now Trending 2012 ASPR app competition winner.
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Early Flu Season Found Lurking in Social Data

Early Flu Season Found Lurking in Social Data | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it

A small start-up called Sickweather says public tweets and Facebook messages helped it declare an early start to this year’s U.S. flu season, six weeks before the CDC

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Pharma Marketing Blog: The Year 2012 in Images

These are my favorite images from posts made to Pharma Marketing Blog in 2012.
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Could Vaccines Someday Improve Heart Health?

Could Vaccines Someday Improve Heart Health? | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it
In early studies, injections lowered cholesterol and blood pressure in animals (_Could vaccines someday improve heart health?
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Public Relations in the Networked Age: The new information ecosystem of e-patients

Lee Rainie will discuss the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project’s latest research on how people get, share and create information in the digital age.
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CrowdMed gets $1.1M to crowdsource diagnosis

CrowdMed gets $1.1M to crowdsource diagnosis | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it

"use “the wisdom of crowds” to give diagnostic suggestions to patients with obscure or baffling medical conditions."

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Anonymous docs to be unmasked under new social media rules

Anonymous docs to be unmasked under new social media rules | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it

The new General Medical Council document: ‘Good Medical Practice’ has said that doctors: “Should identify themselves by name if they talk about medicine online because of the weight attached to their opinion”.

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Saving Limbs Through Science? There’s an App for That. - MortarBlog | MortarBlog

Saving Limbs Through Science? There’s an App for That. - MortarBlog | MortarBlog | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it
Mortar's saving lives! Well, we created an iPad app that helps doctors save lives, and if A = B, and B= C...... http://t.co/hhBm9rI5mM
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MindWave Mobile: MyndPlay Bundle

MindWave Mobile: MyndPlay Bundle | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it

MindWave Mobile is the world’s least expensive research-grade EEG headset available

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wow

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Health and Medicine at the Inflection Point from Ray Kurzweil

Health and Medicine at the Inflection Point from Ray Kurzweil | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it
Ray Kurzweil (Photo credit: Wikipedia) There are few voices in the scientific community that have looked so deep and so far into our humanity.  Ray Kurzweil is certainly one of these visionaries.
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EC’s Mathioudakis: “You cannot build a sustainable food industry on misleading health claims”

EC’s Mathioudakis: “You cannot build a sustainable food industry on misleading health claims” | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it
With the European Union’s strict health food and supplement marketing laws in place, the European Commission’s food law unit head, Basil Mathioudakis, tells NutraIngredients why it’s generally working out fine… but don’t hold your breath over a hasty...
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theChestReg app is an essential respiratory medicine resource

theChestReg app is an essential respiratory medicine resource | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it
theChestReg is a fantastic app to have available to keep up to date with respiratory medicine.
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Robodocs and tricorders: a telemedicine-informed future for health

Robodocs and tricorders: a telemedicine-informed future for health | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it

Aside from the rise of sensors, expanded broadband access and the ubiquity of connected and mobile devices among patients and doctors, several health-specific trends are making remote care more of a reality. More patients are coming online, meaning that fewer doctors will be needed to serve more patients; payment models are shifting from fee-for-service to managed care approaches that emphasize patient outcomes; and hospitals are under more pressure to keep re-admission rates down. Remote monitoring and communication technology could play a critical role in addressing each of those issues.

 

Some telehealth innovations, like the iRobot that lets doctors visit  a patient’s bedside via an electronic avatar and 15-inch screen, seem like the stuff of science fiction. San Francisco-based Scanadu is developing handheld tools that have been likened to the StarTrek “Tricorder.”  A recent product lets you check your temperature, blood oxygen levels, pulse and other vitals by holding the device close to your body. Then it sends the information to your smartphone, where it can be sent on to your doctor. To encourage more innovation in sensor-based mobile technology, the X Prize Foundation even developed the Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize competition (in which Scanadu is a participant). A “Magic Carpet”developed by researchers at GE and Intel, uses sensors in home carpets to monitor seniors’ activity and then predict and detect falls.

 

 


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Health-care sector vulnerable to hackers, researchers say

Health-care sector vulnerable to hackers, researchers say | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it

Security researchers warn that intruders could exploit known gaps to steal patients’ records for use in identity theft schemes and even launch disruptive attacks that could shut down critical hospital systems..

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Jawbone - Products for Your Mobile Lifestyle

Jawbone designs and creates wireless speakers (JAMBOX & BIG JAMBOX) with LiveAudio, Bluetooth headsets (ERA & ICON HD) with NoiseAssassin, health bands (UP) and apps (UP, JAWBONE COMPANION)
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Social Media, mHealth and Medicine: 2012 in Review and Hopes for the Future

Social Media, mHealth and Medicine: 2012 in Review and Hopes for the Future | Health on the Move > 2013 | Scoop.it
As we reflect on 2012 and the changes that have occurred in healthcare, I am astounded by the increasingly significant roles that social media and mHealth are playing in medicine today.
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