404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links
510 views | +0 today
Follow
404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links
Sources, resources and ideas on how to overcome Broken Connections and establish sustainable successful new ones
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Filipe MS Bento from Science 2.0 news
Scoop.it!

BishopBlog: Blogging as post-publication peer review: reasonable or unfair?

BishopBlog: Blogging as post-publication peer review: reasonable or unfair? | 404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links | Scoop.it

In a previous blogpost, I criticised a recent paper claiming that playing action video games improved reading in dyslexics. In a series of comments below the blogpost, two of the authors, Andrea Facoetti and Simone Gori, have responded to my criticisms. I thank them for taking the trouble to spell out their views and giving readers the opportunity to see another point of view. I am, however, not persuaded by their arguments, which make two main points. First, that their study was not methodologically weak and so Current Biology was right to publish it, and second, that it is unfair, and indeed unethical, to criticise a scientific paper in a blog, rather than through the regular scientific channels. (...) - by Deevy Bishop, BishopBlog, 21 March 2013


Via Julien Hering, PhD
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Filipe MS Bento from Science 2.0 news
Scoop.it!

4 ways open access enhances academic freedom

4 ways open access enhances academic freedom | 404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links | Scoop.it

Are politicians stealing our academic freedom? Is their fetish with open access publishing leading to a "pay to say" system for the rich?

Will the trendy goal of making publicly financed research freely available skew the world of scholarship even more in the direction of the natural sciences?

I don’t think so. But it took me a while to get there. (...) - by Curt Rice, Blog "Thourghts on university leadership", March 27, 2013


Via Julien Hering, PhD
Filipe MS Bento's insight:

Rather relevant and concise thoughts/analysis about Open access policies, namely the trending Gold route of Open Access publishing, the related Open Data movement that is to stay, and four examples how open access publishing may enhance academic freedom.

 

For a concise analysis of the different ways of Open Access publishing/archiving have a look at SHERPA’s brief guide: http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/documents/sherpaplusdocs/Nottingham-colour-guide.pdf

more...
Filipe MS Bento's curator insight, April 5, 2013 6:36 AM

Rather relevant thoughts about Open access policies, namely the trending Gold route of Open Access publishing, the related Open Data movement, that is here to stay, and four examples how open access publishing may enhance academic freedom.

 

For a concise analysis of the different ways of Open Access publishing/archiving, please do have a look at SHERPA’s brief guide: http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/documents/sherpaplusdocs/Nottingham-colour-guide.pdf