404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links
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404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links
Sources, resources and ideas on how to overcome Broken Connections and establish sustainable successful new ones
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Rescooped by Filipe MS Bento from The New Global Open Public Sphere
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Open questions about open data

Open questions about open data | 404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links | Scoop.it
The open data movement could lead to a new era of community-led democratisation, but who will profit the most, asks Tom Slee

Via Pierre Levy
Filipe MS Bento's insight:

Linked Open Data (data placed in context by interconnecting several sources, data interlinked so to become more useful) and Open Data (raw data from research, census, public data, etc.): one word makes all the difference.

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Pierre Levy's curator insight, March 26, 2013 2:12 PM

Openness in itself is not a virtue...(may be just a "basic"?)

luiy's curator insight, March 26, 2013 3:50 PM

Will the open data movement be a force for community-led democratisation or for a new wave of algorithm-driven corporate giants? There are worrying signs of the latter.

 

A recent white paper from CapGemini on unlocking economic value by opening up government and public data highlights Silicon Valley real-estate advertising company Zillow to show the economic benefits of open data. Built on open tax data, county records and home-for-sale listings, Zillow launched a free service last October, listing homes going through the foreclosure process – and also potentially exposing the owners' financial troubles to neighbours and employers. Is this reckless profiteering the democratisation we are looking for?

 

There is no doubt that more government data can usefully come out from Whitehall and local town halls, but we should not to be swept away by the appealing language of openness.

 

There is room for a number of models when providing access, including non-commercial licences, closed partnerships between cities and citizen groups, and the use of non-standard formats for sharing that reflect the quirks of individual cities. Each of these breaks the idea of "openness" in one way or another, but we should be prepared to do so.

 

Openness itself is not a virtue, and it's time the debate moved beyond it.

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The promise and perils of a datafied world

The promise and perils of a datafied world | 404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links | Scoop.it

Via Pierre Levy
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Pierre Levy's curator insight, March 26, 2013 11:19 AM

First, then, a definition. Big data describes the idea that everything can be digitised and "datafied" – thanks to cheaper storage, faster processing and better algorithms. And that really means everything, from your current location or liking for strawberry pop tarts, to your propensity for misspelling and degree of personal compassion. And not just your data: everyone's data.

This changes science, say the authors, by ridding us of biased random samples and the need to massage the resulting data to make it sufficiently representative of a larger population. Could biased sample sets be at the root of many failed attempts to replicate experiments?