404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links
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404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links
Sources, resources and ideas on how to overcome Broken Connections and establish sustainable successful new ones
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Rescooped by Filipe MS Bento from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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MOOCs: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn and Udacity

MOOCs: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn and Udacity | 404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links | Scoop.it

With Coursera and edX both announced this week they are doubling the number of universities partners, I decided to update the data. I also added another MOOC: Futurelearn

One more thing that was added to the visualisation is the average University World Ranking by MOOCs.


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Top Free Classes's comment, March 7, 2013 10:55 PM
Thanks!
GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, March 8, 2013 7:45 AM

Ackn. Justin Menard - interest in Rankings by MOOCs and Uni's

Justin Menard's comment, May 7, 2013 8:59 PM
I have updated the visualisation with the most recent information, added 2 new Moocs and 5 more world university rankings

We now have 6 MOOCs in the Viz: Coursera, edX, Futurelearn, Iversity, OpenEd and Udacity
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Europeans Take a More Cautious Approach Toward Online Courses ( New York Times)

Europeans Take a More Cautious Approach Toward Online Courses ( New York Times) | 404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links | Scoop.it

While the atmosphere around the open courses in the United States resembles the early stages of an oil boom, the reaction in Europe seems distinctly cautious. … Originally, the ideal [of MOOCs] was about widening access to elite courses, [but] can it still be about widening access when it’s increasingly about finding new business models and competitive advantage? … for other European universities, even well-established ones, the temptation to jump on the open-course bandwagon has been irresistible. … for some Europeans, the big online courses [i.e. MOOCs] represent a step back from the idealism of open courseware to the values of the marketplace.

 


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 25, 2013 3:50 PM

The above is a sample of quotes from  a report by the NYT reporter on a conference that was held at the University of London (UK) earlier this month. The conference was about online learning, MOOCs featured large. The article is interesting in that it shows that the European attitude towards MOOCs is a mix of fear to be left behind and resistance to tamper with the quality of higher education. This leads to either an attitude of monitoring what goes on without actively participating (Veronica Campbell  of Trinity College Dublin: “there is a fear of being left behind, so we are considering what to do.”) or careful attempts to set up a MOOC, either via the existing commercial platforms or via home-built ones.

 

If we may believe the NYT, the strong and sweeping statements that so much characterise the US attitude towards MOOCs (Nathan Harden: "In fifty years, if not much sooner, half of the roughly 4,500 colleges and universities now operating in the United States will have ceased to exist") are entirely missing. Whether this reflects the differences in organisation and financial health of European versus US higher education or a more or less cautious attitude towards (disruptive) innovations, the article does not discuss. But I guess it would be a safe bet to say it is a bit of both. (@pbsloep) 

 

For the Nathan Harden quote, see http://tiny.cc/ocx2sw

 
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MOOCs – Massive Open Online Courses: European University Association occasional papers (by Michael Gaebel)

But if it’s not new and better education, then what is the purpose of MOOCs? And why are some of the top universities that did not succeed in online courses only a few years ago so eager to try again?

Obviously, the two most crucial issues at stake are currently the question of the business model, and the issue of awarding credits. But in whatever way MOOCs may develop in the long run, the fact that they currently get so much attention and cause controversial discussions gives hope that this might inspire a much broader debate on learning and teaching in higher education that seems long overdue.

 


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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 26, 2013 6:13 AM

A 20 or so pages long report that discusses such questions as what MOOCs are, who provide them, how they work, how they are designed and funded, who the students are. It is a quite comprehensive report even though there's little news in it for whoever follows the news on MOOCs closely. But that audience the report isn't of course intended for. It is intended for the governors of European universities to allow them to adopt a stance. And they have. According to Science Guide (http://tiny.cc/2x03sw), which was present at a meeting of the European University Association (EUA) where the present report was presented, there is little enthusiasm. To quote them: "… the associated European Universities are not very keen on venturing into experiments with Open Education, so long as it’s unclear what the future looks like". The report, which seems to represent the EUA's position, doubts the pedagogical and didactic value of MOOCs, is not keen on the involvement of businesses (who "respond to powerful brands, and do not necessarily adopt the best solutions"), but is particularly critical of the lack of quality control mechanisms. What that may lead to we have seen with the mishaps Coursera experienced this month (see http://tiny.cc/6m13sw)  and (http://tiny.cc/yo13sw

(@pbsloep)