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404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links
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Rescooped by Filipe MS Bento from Open access in science
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EU Opens Up Access to Scientific Research

EU Opens Up Access to Scientific Research | 404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links | Scoop.it
New scientific research must be published for free online, the vice-president of the European Commission said, in a move designed to increase the knowledge pool open to small business and lead to more innovative products.

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Rescooped by Filipe MS Bento from Networked Learning - MOOCs and more
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Europeans Take a More Cautious Approach Toward Online Courses ( New York Times)

Europeans Take a More Cautious Approach Toward Online Courses ( New York Times) | 404 BC -- Finding the Missing Links | Scoop.it

While the atmosphere around the open courses in the United States resembles the early stages of an oil boom, the reaction in Europe seems distinctly cautious. … Originally, the ideal [of MOOCs] was about widening access to elite courses, [but] can it still be about widening access when it’s increasingly about finding new business models and competitive advantage? … for other European universities, even well-established ones, the temptation to jump on the open-course bandwagon has been irresistible. … for some Europeans, the big online courses [i.e. MOOCs] represent a step back from the idealism of open courseware to the values of the marketplace.

 


Via Peter B. Sloep
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Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, February 25, 2013 3:50 PM

The above is a sample of quotes from  a report by the NYT reporter on a conference that was held at the University of London (UK) earlier this month. The conference was about online learning, MOOCs featured large. The article is interesting in that it shows that the European attitude towards MOOCs is a mix of fear to be left behind and resistance to tamper with the quality of higher education. This leads to either an attitude of monitoring what goes on without actively participating (Veronica Campbell  of Trinity College Dublin: “there is a fear of being left behind, so we are considering what to do.”) or careful attempts to set up a MOOC, either via the existing commercial platforms or via home-built ones.

 

If we may believe the NYT, the strong and sweeping statements that so much characterise the US attitude towards MOOCs (Nathan Harden: "In fifty years, if not much sooner, half of the roughly 4,500 colleges and universities now operating in the United States will have ceased to exist") are entirely missing. Whether this reflects the differences in organisation and financial health of European versus US higher education or a more or less cautious attitude towards (disruptive) innovations, the article does not discuss. But I guess it would be a safe bet to say it is a bit of both. (@pbsloep) 

 

For the Nathan Harden quote, see http://tiny.cc/ocx2sw