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Incredible Ways People Deal with Overloaded Transit Systems in Asia

Incredible Ways People Deal with Overloaded Transit Systems in Asia | 3D Relationships on 2D surfaces | Scoop.it
Overcrowded public transit systems are a fact of daily life around the world. But in many Asian countries, dealing with them has become something of an art form.

Via Mathijs Booden
Makenna Jordan's insight:

The pictures and information in this article honestly scare me, it seems incredibly unhealth and really unsafe also (obviously). I dont know if the fact that I dont like tight spacing is why this article is bothering me so much or what, but looking at this makes me feel incredibly sorry for the people that have to deal with that. I can barely deal with the crowding in the First Colonial halways, I could never even imagine being in that situation.

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Rescooped by Makenna Jordan from Classroom geography
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Incredible Ways People Deal with Overloaded Transit Systems in Asia

Incredible Ways People Deal with Overloaded Transit Systems in Asia | 3D Relationships on 2D surfaces | Scoop.it
Overcrowded public transit systems are a fact of daily life around the world. But in many Asian countries, dealing with them has become something of an art form.

Via Mathijs Booden
Makenna Jordan's insight:

The pictures and information in this article honestly scare me, it seems incredibly unhealth and really unsafe also (obviously). I dont know if the fact that I dont like tight spacing is why this article is bothering me so much or what, but looking at this makes me feel incredibly sorry for the people that have to deal with that. I can barely deal with the crowding in the First Colonial halways, I could never even imagine being in that situation.

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10 Images that Sum Up the Geological History of the Earth

10  Images that Sum Up the Geological History of the Earth | 3D Relationships on 2D surfaces | Scoop.it
Earth is 4.5 billion years old, and during that time it's been through a lot of dramatic changes -- as well as enormous disasters that reshaped the oceans and continents.

Via Mathijs Booden
Makenna Jordan's insight:

These photos truly show how different and diverse earths surface is, there really are no two places that are identical to eachother which is crazy to think about because earth is so huge compared to us. These photos show hey gorgeous various places of the world really are.

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3D relationships on 2D surfaces

3D relationships on 2D surfaces | 3D Relationships on 2D surfaces | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Makenna Jordan's insight:

I think the idea of drawing a map on an orange is so clever because it really shows us that it's basuically impossible to take an image from a round spherical shape and transform it into the same exact thing on a 2D surface 

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espaciosalternativos's comment, September 11, 2013 1:26 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goode_homolosine_projection
espaciosalternativos's comment, September 11, 2013 1:27 PM
http://cargocollective.com/alvinaronson/Orange-Peel-Map
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, September 11, 2013 2:00 PM
Africa is often misrepresented see a good map here http://www.mapsofworld.com/africa/
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The world’s happiest and least happy countries, mapped

The world’s happiest and least happy countries, mapped | 3D Relationships on 2D surfaces | Scoop.it
Can you measure happiness? A UN-sponsored Columbia University report set out to try.

Via Mathijs Booden
Makenna Jordan's insight:

I've never seen a map like this but it's crazy that someone would think to make a map based on how happy others is. And if you really read into the article and take sometime to look at the map, It dosent seem to be so incorrect. I found this map incredibly interesting because I've never seen anything like it before. 

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Mathijs Booden's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:48 PM

Map based on data in the World Happines Report 2013 (http://unsdsn.org/happiness/).

 

Seems largely comparable to GDP/capita.

Tracy Klug's curator insight, September 16, 2013 2:40 PM

What cultural values are implied by the happiest countries in the world?

Mathijs Booden's comment, September 19, 2013 1:02 PM
@Makenna I don't think the map is incorrect, just that it correlates pretty well with a map of GDP/capita, an index of how wealthy people are on average. Having said that, there are a lot of anomalies. For example, Mexicans are apparently happier than most Europeans despite earning considerably less and having their country torn by organized crime, and Botswana is deeply unhappy despite having prospered, relatively speaking, in economic terms (HIV?).
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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | 3D Relationships on 2D surfaces | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

Via Seth Dixon
Makenna Jordan's insight:

The fact that Hong Kong would create a backdrop to make it seem as if the air isn't polluted is crazy. Not only does it probably make the tourist never want to go there but instead of working to try and fix the problem they work to try to mask the problem, so more people will continue to visit. Which in my eyes, is not right in anyway what so ever

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 24, 2014 11:10 PM

This is beyond absurd.  Put up a picture of what the landscape should look like so people can take pictures instead of dealing with the real problem at hand.  There seems to be a problem with that idea right there.  I understand that a tourist wants to take pictures and document their trip and in some cases may not be able to take a picture of the landscape because it is so covered in pollution to see, but that is a reason to fix the pollution problem not set up a fake picture.  The pollution in China is doing more harm than making it difficult for a tourist to take pictures but it is harming the people that live there.  The amount of very dangerous days that they have that toxic chemicals and the like are in the air is ridiculous.  This is the air that people are breathing in.  It should be more of a concern to leaders that the people that live in China are potentially facing very serious health problems because of the pollution than it seems to be.  Constructing a wall with a fake skyline does not fix any actual problem.  Yes now they can get a decent picture of their trip, but everyone is still suffering the consequences from real problem.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:17 PM

This article covers both a somewhat humorous occurrence which has a really tragic side to it. In Hong Kong these murals  are erected so that both natives as well as tourists are able to take nice pictures, which they are normally unable to because of the horrible smog hanging over the city. It seems like this like treating the symptoms and not the actual disease. Instead of attempting to clean the air making it possible to people to take real pictures (and breath easier) they'd rather just put up fake pictures making photos easier. While this approach is definitely easier I fell the alternative is a far wiser course of action. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:43 PM

Before the solution in Hong Kong can actually change, I believe that the government must first take into consideration the ways in which their mass production and their lack for environmental regulation has brought them this far into such a high level of carbon into the air. What might come off to some as a cloudy day in Hong Kong is actually the everyday appearance of their environment. These high levels of carbon into the atmosphere can have long lasting effects on the lives of the people and future generation if this problem isn't properly cared for.